• This paper studies the need for individualizing vehicular communications in order to improve collision warning systems for an N-lane highway scenario. By relating the traffic-based and communications studies, we aim at reducing highway traffic accidents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that shows how to customize vehicular communications to driver's characteristics and traffic information. We propose to develop VANET protocols that selectively identify crash relevant information and customize the communications of that information based on each driver's assigned safety score. In this paper, first, we derive the packet success probability by accounting for multi-user interference, path loss, and fading. Then, by Monte carlo simulations, we demonstrate how appropriate channel access probabilities that satisfy the delay requirements of the safety application result in noticeable performance enhancement.
  • Every year, many people are killed and injured in highway traffic accidents. In order to reduce such casualties, collisions warning systems has been studied extensively. These systems are built by taking the driver reaction times into account. However, most of the existing literature focuses on characterizing how driver reaction times vary across an entire population. Therefore, many of the warnings that are given turn out to be false alarms. A false alarm occurs whenever a warning is sent, but it is not needed. This would nagate any safety benefit of the system, and could even reduce the overall safety if warnings become a distraction. In this paper, we propose our solution to address the described problem; First, we briefly describe our method for estimating the distribution of brake response times for a particular driver using data from a Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network (VANET) system. Then, we investigate how brake response times of individual drivers can be used in collision warning algorithms to reduce false alarm rates while still maintaining a high level of safety. This will yield a system that is overall more reliable and trustworthy for drivers, which could lead to wider adoption and applicability for V2V/V2I communication systems. Moreover, we show how false alarm rate varies with respect to probability of accident. Our simulation results show that by individualizing collision warnings the number of false alarms can be reduced more than $50\%$. Then, we conclude safety applications could potentially take full advantage of being customized to an individual's characteristics.
  • Many analytic results for the connectivity, coverage, and capacity of wireless networks have been reported for the case where the number of nodes, $n$, tends to infinity (large-scale networks). The majority of these results have not been extended for small or moderate values of $n$; whereas in many practical networks, $n$ is not very large. In this paper, we consider finite (small-scale) wireless sensor networks. We first show that previous asymptotic results provide poor approximations for such networks. We provide a set of differences between small-scale and large-scale analysis and propose a methodology for analysis of finite sensor networks. Furthermore, we consider two models for such networks: unreliable sensor grids, and sensor networks with random node deployment. We provide easily computable expressions for bounds on the coverage and connectivity of these networks. With validation from simulations, we show that the derived analytic expressions give very good estimates of such quantities for finite sensor networks. Our investigation confirms the fact that small-scale networks possesses unique characteristics different from the large-scale counterparts, necessitating the development of a new framework for their analysis and design.