• The degree splitting problem requires coloring the edges of a graph red or blue such that each node has almost the same number of edges in each color, up to a small additive discrepancy. The directed variant of the problem requires orienting the edges such that each node has almost the same number of incoming and outgoing edges, again up to a small additive discrepancy. We present deterministic distributed algorithms for both variants, which improve on their counterparts presented by Ghaffari and Su [SODA'17]: our algorithms are significantly simpler and faster, and have a much smaller discrepancy. This also leads to a faster and simpler deterministic algorithm for $(2+o(1))\Delta$-edge-coloring, improving on that of Ghaffari and Su.
  • In a recent breakthrough, Paz and Schwartzman (SODA'17) presented a single-pass ($2+\epsilon$)-approximation algorithm for the maximum weight matching problem in the semi-streaming model. Their algorithm uses $O(n\log^2 n)$ bits of space, for any constant $\epsilon>0$. We present two simplified and more intuitive analyses, for essentially the same algorithm, which also improve the space complexity to the optimal bound of $O(n\log n)$ bits --- this is optimal as the output matching requires $\Omega(n\log n)$ bits. Our analyses rely on a simple use of the primal-dual method and a simple accounting method.
  • The \emph{Undecided-State Dynamics} is a well-known protocol for distributed consensus. We analyze it in the parallel \pull\ communication model on the complete graph for the \emph{binary} case (every node can either support one of \emph{two} possible colors, or be in the undecided state). An interesting open question is whether this dynamics \emph{always} (i.e., starting from an arbitrary initial configuration) reaches consensus \emph{quickly} (i.e., within a polylogarithmic number of rounds) in a complete graph with $n$ nodes. Previous work in this setting only considers initial color configurations with no undecided nodes and a large \emph{bias} (i.e., $\Theta(n)$) towards the majority color. In this paper we present an \textit{unconditional} analysis of the Undecided-State Dynamics that answers to the above question in the affirmative. We prove that, starting from \textit{any} initial configuration, the process reaches a monochromatic configuration within $O(\log n)$ rounds, with high probability. This bound turns out to be tight. Our analysis also shows that, if the initial configuration has bias $\Omega(\sqrt{n\log n})$, then the dynamics converges toward the initial majority color, with high probability.
  • Computing shortest paths is one of the central problems in the theory of distributed computing. For the last few years, substantial progress has been made on the approximate single source shortest paths problem, culminating in an algorithm of Becker et al. [DISC'17] which deterministically computes $(1+o(1))$-approximate shortest paths in $\tilde O(D+\sqrt n)$ time, where $D$ is the hop-diameter of the graph. Up to logarithmic factors, this time complexity is optimal, matching the lower bound of Elkin [STOC'04]. The question of exact shortest paths however saw no algorithmic progress for decades, until the recent breakthrough of Elkin [STOC'17], which established a sublinear-time algorithm for exact single source shortest paths on undirected graphs. Shortly after, Huang et al. [FOCS'17] provided improved algorithms for exact all pairs shortest paths problem on directed graphs. In this paper, we present a new single-source shortest path algorithm with complexity $\tilde O(n^{3/4}D^{1/4})$. For polylogarithmic $D$, this improves on Elkin's $\tilde{O}(n^{5/6})$ bound and gets closer to the $\tilde{\Omega}(n^{1/2})$ lower bound of Elkin [STOC'04]. For larger values of $D$, we present an improved variant of our algorithm which achieves complexity $\tilde{O}\left( n^{3/4+o(1)}+ \min\{ n^{3/4}D^{1/6},n^{6/7}\}+D\right)$, and thus compares favorably with Elkin's bound of $\tilde{O}(n^{5/6} + n^{2/3}D^{1/3} + D ) $ in essentially the entire range of parameters. This algorithm provides also a qualitative improvement, because it works for the more challenging case of directed graphs (i.e., graphs where the two directions of an edge can have different weights), constituting the first sublinear-time algorithm for directed graphs. Our algorithm also extends to the case of exact $\kappa$-source shortest paths...
  • The gap between the known randomized and deterministic local distributed algorithms underlies arguably the most fundamental and central open question in distributed graph algorithms. In this paper, we develop a generic and clean recipe for derandomizing randomized LOCAL algorithms and transforming them into efficient deterministic LOCAL algorithm. We also exhibit how this simple recipe leads to significant improvements on a number of problems, in cases resolving known open problems. Two sample end-results are as follows: - An improved distributed hypergraph maximal matching algorithm, which improves on that of Fischer, Ghaffari, and Kuhn [FOCS'17], and leads to improved algorithms for edge-coloring, maximum matching approximation, and low out-degree edge orientation. The first gives an improved algorithm for Open Problem 11.4 of the book of Barenboim and Elkin, and the last gives the first positive resolution of their Open Problem 11.10. - An improved distributed algorithm for the Lov\'{a}sz Local Lemma, which gets closer to a conjecture of Chang and Pettie [FOCS'17], and moreover leads to improved distributed algorithms for problems such as defective coloring and $k$-SAT.
  • We present a randomized distributed algorithm that computes a $\Delta$-coloring in any non-complete graph with maximum degree $\Delta \geq 4$ in $O(\log \Delta) + 2^{O(\sqrt{\log\log n})}$ rounds, as well as a randomized algorithm that computes a $\Delta$-coloring in $O((\log \log n)^2)$ rounds when $\Delta \in [3, O(1)]$. Both these algorithms improve on an $O(\log^3 n/\log \Delta)$-round algorithm of Panconesi and Srinivasan~[STOC'1993], which has remained the state of the art for the past 25 years. Moreover, the latter algorithm gets (exponentially) closer to an $\Omega(\log\log n)$ round lower bound of Brandt et al.~[STOC'16].
  • We present $O(\log\log n)$-round algorithms in the Massively Parallel Computation (MPC) model, with $\tilde{O}(n)$ memory per machine, that compute a maximal independent set, a $1+\epsilon$ approximation of maximum matching, and a $2+\epsilon$ approximation of minimum vertex cover, for any $n$-vertex graph and any constant $\epsilon>0$. These improve the state of the art as follows: -- Our MIS algorithm leads to a simple $O(\log\log \Delta)$-round MIS algorithm in the Congested Clique model of distributed computing. This result improves exponentially on the $\tilde{O}(\sqrt{\log \Delta})$-round algorithm of Ghaffari [PODC'17]. -- Our $O(\log\log n)$-round $(1+\epsilon)$-approximate maximum matching algorithm simplifies and improves on a rather complex $O(\log^2\log n)$-round $(1+\epsilon)$-approximation algorithm of Czumaj et al. [STOC'18]. -- Our $O(\log\log n)$-round $(2+\epsilon)$-approximate minimum vertex cover algorithm improves on an $O(\log\log n)$-round $O(1)$-approximation of Assadi et al. [arXiv'17].
  • \emph{Sampling} constitutes an important tool in a variety of areas: from machine learning and combinatorial optimization to computational physics and biology. A central class of sampling algorithms is the \emph{Markov Chain Monte Carlo} method, based on the construction of a Markov chain with the desired sampling distribution as its stationary distribution. Many of the traditional Markov chains, such as the \emph{Glauber dynamics}, do not scale well with increasing dimension. To address this shortcoming, we propose a simple local update rule based on the Glauber dynamics that leads to efficient parallel and distributed algorithms for sampling from Gibbs distributions. Concretely, we present a Markov chain that mixes in $O(\log n)$ rounds when Dobrushin's condition for the Gibbs distribution is satisfied. This improves over the \emph{LubyGlauber} algorithm by Feng, Sun, and Yin [PODC'17], which needs $O(\Delta \log n)$ rounds, and their \emph{LocalMetropolis} algorithm, which converges in $O(\log n)$ rounds but requires a considerably stronger mixing condition. Here, $n$ denotes the number of nodes in the graphical model inducing the Gibbs distribution, and $\Delta$ its maximum degree. In particular, our method can sample a uniform proper coloring with $(2+\eps)\Delta$ colors in $O(\log n)$ rounds, for any constant $\eps >0$, which almost matches the threshold of the sequential Glauber dynamics and improves on the $(2 +\sqrt{2}+\eps)\Delta$ threshold of Feng et al.
  • Graph coloring is one of the central problems in distributed graph algorithms. Much of the research on this topic has focused on coloring with $\Delta+1$ colors, where $\Delta$ denotes the maximum degree. Using $\Delta+1$ colors may be unsatisfactory in sparse graphs, where not all nodes have such a high degree; it would be more desirable to use a number of colors that improves with sparsity. A standard measure that captures sparsity is arboricity, which is the smallest number of forests into which the edges of the graph can be partitioned. We present simple randomized distributed algorithms that, with high probability, color any $n$-node $\alpha$-arboricity graph: - using $(2+\varepsilon)\cdot \alpha$ colors, for constant $\varepsilon>0$, in $O(\log n)$ rounds, if $\alpha=\tilde{\Omega}(\log n)$, or - using $O(\alpha \log \alpha )$ colors, in $O(\log n)$ rounds, or - using $O(\alpha)$ colors, in $O(\log n \cdot \min\{\log\log n,\; \log \alpha\})$ rounds. These algorithms are nearly-optimal, as it is known by results of Linial [FOCS'87] and Barenboim and Elkin [PODC'08] that coloring with $\Theta(\alpha)$ colors, or even poly$(\alpha)$ colors, requires $\Omega(\log_{\alpha} n)$ rounds. The previously best-known $O(\log n)$-time result was a deterministic algorithm due to Barenboim and Elkin [PODC'08], which uses $\Theta(\alpha ^2)$ colors. Barenboim and Elkin stated improving this number of colors as an open problem in their Distributed Graph Coloring Book.
  • We present a simple distributed $\Delta$-approximation algorithm for maximum weight independent set (MaxIS) in the $\mathsf{CONGEST}$ model which completes in $O(\texttt{MIS}(G)\cdot \log W)$ rounds, where $\Delta$ is the maximum degree, $\texttt{MIS}(G)$ is the number of rounds needed to compute a maximal independent set (MIS) on $G$, and $W$ is the maximum weight of a node. %Whether our algorithm is randomized or deterministic depends on the \texttt{MIS} algorithm used as a black-box. Plugging in the best known algorithm for MIS gives a randomized solution in $O(\log n \log W)$ rounds, where $n$ is the number of nodes. We also present a deterministic $O(\Delta +\log^* n)$-round algorithm based on coloring. We then show how to use our MaxIS approximation algorithms to compute a $2$-approximation for maximum weight matching without incurring any additional round penalty in the $\mathsf{CONGEST}$ model. We use a known reduction for simulating algorithms on the line graph while incurring congestion, but we show our algorithm is part of a broad family of \emph{local aggregation algorithms} for which we describe a mechanism that allows the simulation to run in the $\mathsf{CONGEST}$ model without an additional overhead. Next, we show that for maximum weight matching, relaxing the approximation factor to ($2+\varepsilon$) allows us to devise a distributed algorithm requiring $O(\frac{\log \Delta}{\log\log\Delta})$ rounds for any constant $\varepsilon>0$. For the unweighted case, we can even obtain a $(1+\varepsilon)$-approximation in this number of rounds. These algorithms are the first to achieve the provably optimal round complexity with respect to dependency on $\Delta$.
  • We present a tight analysis for the well-studied randomized 3-majority dynamics of stabilizing consensus, hence answering the main open question of Becchetti et al. [SODA'16]. Consider a distributed system of n nodes, each initially holding an opinion in {1, 2, ..., k}. The system should converge to a setting where all (non-corrupted) nodes hold the same opinion. This consensus opinion should be \emph{valid}, meaning that it should be among the initially supported opinions, and the (fast) convergence should happen even in the presence of a malicious adversary who can corrupt a bounded number of nodes per round and in particular modify their opinions. A well-studied distributed algorithm for this problem is the 3-majority dynamics, which works as follows: per round, each node gathers three opinions --- say by taking its own and two of other nodes sampled at random --- and then it sets its opinion equal to the majority of this set; ties are broken arbitrarily, e.g., towards the node's own opinion. Becchetti et al. [SODA'16] showed that the 3-majority dynamics converges to consensus in O((k^2\sqrt{\log n} + k\log n)(k+\log n)) rounds, even in the presence of a limited adversary. We prove that, even with a stronger adversary, the convergence happens within O(k\log n) rounds. This bound is known to be optimal.
  • Locally Checkable Labeling (LCL) problems include essentially all the classic problems of $\mathsf{LOCAL}$ distributed algorithms. In a recent enlightening revelation, Chang and Pettie [arXiv 1704.06297] showed that any LCL (on bounded degree graphs) that has an $o(\log n)$-round randomized algorithm can be solved in $T_{LLL}(n)$ rounds, which is the randomized complexity of solving (a relaxed variant of) the Lov\'asz Local Lemma (LLL) on bounded degree $n$-node graphs. Currently, the best known upper bound on $T_{LLL}(n)$ is $O(\log n)$, by Chung, Pettie, and Su [PODC'14], while the best known lower bound is $\Omega(\log\log n)$, by Brandt et al. [STOC'16]. Chang and Pettie conjectured that there should be an $O(\log\log n)$-round algorithm. Making the first step of progress towards this conjecture, and providing a significant improvement on the algorithm of Chung et al. [PODC'14], we prove that $T_{LLL}(n)= 2^{O(\sqrt{\log\log n})}$. Thus, any $o(\log n)$-round randomized distributed algorithm for any LCL problem on bounded degree graphs can be automatically sped up to run in $2^{O(\sqrt{\log\log n})}$ rounds. Using this improvement and a number of other ideas, we also improve the complexity of a number of graph coloring problems (in arbitrary degree graphs) from the $O(\log n)$-round results of Chung, Pettie and Su [PODC'14] to $2^{O(\sqrt{\log\log n})}$. These problems include defective coloring, frugal coloring, and list vertex-coloring.
  • We present a deterministic distributed algorithm that computes a $(2\Delta-1)$-edge-coloring, or even list-edge-coloring, in any $n$-node graph with maximum degree $\Delta$, in $O(\log^7 \Delta \log n)$ rounds. This answers one of the long-standing open questions of \emph{distributed graph algorithms} from the late 1980s, which asked for a polylogarithmic-time algorithm. See, e.g., Open Problem 4 in the Distributed Graph Coloring book of Barenboim and Elkin. The previous best round complexities were $2^{O(\sqrt{\log n})}$ by Panconesi and Srinivasan [STOC'92] and $\tilde{O}(\sqrt{\Delta}) + O(\log^* n)$ by Fraigniaud, Heinrich, and Kosowski [FOCS'16]. A corollary of our deterministic list-edge-coloring also improves the randomized complexity of $(2\Delta-1)$-edge-coloring to poly$(\log\log n)$ rounds. The key technical ingredient is a deterministic distributed algorithm for \emph{hypergraph maximal matching}, which we believe will be of interest beyond this result. In any hypergraph of rank $r$ --- where each hyperedge has at most $r$ vertices --- with $n$ nodes and maximum degree $\Delta$, this algorithm computes a maximal matching in $O(r^5 \log^{6+\log r } \Delta \log n)$ rounds. This hypergraph matching algorithm and its extensions lead to a number of other results. In particular, a polylogarithmic-time deterministic distributed maximal independent set algorithm for graphs with bounded neighborhood independence, hence answering Open Problem 5 of Barenboim and Elkin's book, a $((\log \Delta/\varepsilon)^{O(\log (1/\varepsilon))})$-round deterministic algorithm for $(1+\varepsilon)$-approximation of maximum matching, and a quasi-polylogarithmic-time deterministic distributed algorithm for orienting $\lambda$-arboricity graphs with out-degree at most $(1+\varepsilon)\lambda$, for any constant $\varepsilon>0$, hence partially answering Open Problem 10 of Barenboim and Elkin's book.
  • This paper is centered on the complexity of graph problems in the well-studied LOCAL model of distributed computing, introduced by Linial [FOCS '87]. It is widely known that for many of the classic distributed graph problems (including maximal independent set (MIS) and $(\Delta+1)$-vertex coloring), the randomized complexity is at most polylogarithmic in the size $n$ of the network, while the best deterministic complexity is typically $2^{O(\sqrt{\log n})}$. Understanding and narrowing down this exponential gap is considered to be one of the central long-standing open questions in the area of distributed graph algorithms. We investigate the problem by introducing a complexity-theoretic framework that allows us to shed some light on the role of randomness in the LOCAL model. We define the SLOCAL model as a sequential version of the LOCAL model. Our framework allows us to prove completeness results with respect to the class of problems which can be solved efficiently in the SLOCAL model, implying that if any of the complete problems can be solved deterministically in $\log^{O(1)} n$ rounds in the LOCAL model, we can deterministically solve all efficient SLOCAL-problems (including MIS and $(\Delta+1)$-coloring) in $\log^{O(1)} n$ rounds in the LOCAL model. We show that a rather rudimentary looking graph coloring problem is complete in the above sense: Color the nodes of a graph with colors red and blue such that each node of sufficiently large polylogarithmic degree has at least one neighbor of each color. The problem admits a trivial zero-round randomized solution. The result can be viewed as showing that the only obstacle to getting efficient determinstic algorithms in the LOCAL model is an efficient algorithm to approximately round fractional values into integer values.
  • We study a family of closely-related distributed graph problems, which we call degree splitting, where roughly speaking the objective is to partition (or orient) the edges such that each node's degree is split almost uniformly. Our findings lead to answers for a number of problems, a sampling of which includes: -- We present a $poly(\log n)$ round deterministic algorithm for $(2\Delta-1)\cdot (1+o(1))$-edge-coloring, where $\Delta$ denotes the maximum degree. Modulo the $1+o(1)$ factor, this settles one of the long-standing open problems of the area from the 1990's (see e.g. Panconesi and Srinivasan [PODC'92]). Indeed, a weaker requirement of $(2\Delta-1)\cdot poly(\log \Delta)$-edge-coloring in $poly(\log n)$ rounds was asked for in the 4th open question in the Distributed Graph Coloring book by Barenboim and Elkin. -- We show that sinkless orientation---i.e., orienting edges such that each node has at least one outgoing edge---on $\Delta$-regular graphs can be solved in $O(\log_{\Delta} \log n)$ rounds randomized and in $O(\log_{\Delta} n)$ rounds deterministically. These prove the corresponding lower bounds by Brandt et al. [STOC'16] and Chang, Kopelowitz, and Pettie [FOCS'16] to be tight. Moreover, these show that sinkless orientation exhibits an exponential separation between its randomized and deterministic complexities, akin to the results of Chang et al. for $\Delta$-coloring $\Delta$-regular trees. -- We present a randomized $O(\log^4 n)$ round algorithm for orienting $a$-arboricity graphs with maximum out-degree $a(1+\epsilon)$. This can be also turned into a decomposition into $a (1+\epsilon)$ forests when $a=\Omega(\log n)$ and into $a (1+\epsilon)$ pseduo-forests when $a=o(\log n)$. Obtaining an efficient distributed decomposition into less than $2a$ forests was stated as the 10th open problem in the book by Barenboim and Elkin.
  • In this paper, we study PUSH-PULL style rumor spreading algorithms in the mobile telephone model, a variant of the classical telephone model in which each node can participate in at most one connection per round; i.e., you can no longer have multiple nodes pull information from the same source in a single round. Our model also includes two new parameterized generalizations: (1) the network topology can undergo a bounded rate of change (for a parameterized rate that spans from no changes to changes in every round); and (2) in each round, each node can advertise a bounded amount of information to all of its neighbors before connection decisions are made (for a parameterized number of bits that spans from no advertisement to large advertisements). We prove that in the mobile telephone model with no advertisements and no topology changes, PUSH-PULL style algorithms perform poorly with respect to a graph's vertex expansion and graph conductance as compared to the known tight results in the classical telephone model. We then prove, however, that if nodes are allowed to advertise a single bit in each round, a natural variation of PUSH-PULL terminates in time that matches (within logarithmic factors) this strategy's performance in the classical telephone model---even in the presence of frequent topology changes. We also analyze how the performance of this algorithm degrades as the rate of change increases toward the maximum possible amount. We argue that our model matches well the properties of emerging peer-to-peer communication standards for mobile devices, and that our efficient PUSH-PULL variation that leverages small advertisements and adapts well to topology changes is a good choice for rumor spreading in this increasingly important setting.
  • We present a near-optimal distributed algorithm for $(1+o(1))$-approximation of single-commodity maximum flow in undirected weighted networks that runs in $(D+ \sqrt{n})\cdot n^{o(1)}$ communication rounds in the \Congest model. Here, $n$ and $D$ denote the number of nodes and the network diameter, respectively. This is the first improvement over the trivial bound of $O(n^2)$, and it nearly matches the $\tilde{\Omega}(D+ \sqrt{n})$ round complexity lower bound. The development of the algorithm contains two results of independent interest: (i) A $(D+\sqrt{n})\cdot n^{o(1)}$-round distributed construction of a spanning tree of average stretch $n^{o(1)}$. (ii) A $(D+\sqrt{n})\cdot n^{o(1)}$-round distributed construction of an $n^{o(1)}$-congestion approximator consisting of the cuts induced by $O(\log n)$ virtual trees. The distributed representation of the cut approximator allows for evaluation in $(D+\sqrt{n})\cdot n^{o(1)}$ rounds. All our algorithms make use of randomization and succeed with high probability.
  • The Maximal Independent Set (MIS) problem is one of the basics in the study of locality in distributed graph algorithms. This paper presents an extremely simple randomized algorithm providing a near-optimal local complexity for this problem, which incidentally, when combined with some recent techniques, also leads to a near-optimal global complexity. Classical algorithms of Luby [STOC'85] and Alon, Babai and Itai [JALG'86] provide the global complexity guarantee that, with high probability, all nodes terminate after $O(\log n)$ rounds. In contrast, our initial focus is on the local complexity, and our main contribution is to provide a very simple algorithm guaranteeing that each particular node $v$ terminates after $O(\log \mathsf{deg}(v)+\log 1/\epsilon)$ rounds, with probability at least $1-\epsilon$. The guarantee holds even if the randomness outside $2$-hops neighborhood of $v$ is determined adversarially. This degree-dependency is optimal, due to a lower bound of Kuhn, Moscibroda, and Wattenhofer [PODC'04]. Interestingly, this local complexity smoothly transitions to a global complexity: by adding techniques of Barenboim, Elkin, Pettie, and Schneider [FOCS'12, arXiv: 1202.1983v3], we get a randomized MIS algorithm with a high probability global complexity of $O(\log \Delta) + 2^{O(\sqrt{\log \log n})}$, where $\Delta$ denotes the maximum degree. This improves over the $O(\log^2 \Delta) + 2^{O(\sqrt{\log \log n})}$ result of Barenboim et al., and gets close to the $\Omega(\min\{\log \Delta, \sqrt{\log n}\})$ lower bound of Kuhn et al. Corollaries include improved algorithms for MIS in graphs of upper-bounded arboricity, or lower-bounded girth, for Ruling Sets, for MIS in the Local Computation Algorithms (LCA) model, and a faster distributed algorithm for the Lov\'asz Local Lemma.
  • We introduce the study of the ant colony house-hunting problem from a distributed computing perspective. When an ant colony's nest becomes unsuitable due to size constraints or damage, the colony must relocate to a new nest. The task of identifying and evaluating the quality of potential new nests is distributed among all ants. The ants must additionally reach consensus on a final nest choice and the full colony must be transported to this single new nest. Our goal is to use tools and techniques from distributed computing theory in order to gain insight into the house-hunting process. We develop a formal model for the house-hunting problem inspired by the behavior of the Temnothorax genus of ants. We then show a \Omega(log n) lower bound on the time for all n ants to agree on one of k candidate nests. We also present two algorithms that solve the house-hunting problem in our model. The first algorithm solves the problem in optimal O(log n) time but exhibits some features not characteristic of natural ant behavior. The second algorithm runs in O(k log n) time and uses an extremely simple and natural rule for each ant to decide on the new nest.
  • All consensus hierarchies in the literature assume that we have, in addition to copies of a given object, an unbounded number of registers. But why do we really need these registers? This paper considers what would happen if one attempts to solve consensus using various objects but without any registers. We show that under a reasonable assumption, objects like queues and stacks cannot emulate the missing registers. We also show that, perhaps surprisingly, initialization, shown to have no computational consequences when registers are readily available, is crucial in determining the synchronization power of objects when no registers are allowed. Finally, we show that without registers, the number of available objects affects the level of consensus that can be solved. Our work thus raises the question of whether consensus hierarchies which assume an unbounded number of registers truly capture synchronization power, and begins a line of research aimed at better understanding the interaction between read-write memory and the powerful synchronization operations available on modern architectures.
  • The broadcast throughput in a network is defined as the average number of messages that can be transmitted per unit time from a given source to all other nodes when time goes to infinity. Classical broadcast algorithms treat messages as atomic tokens and route them from the source to the receivers by making intermediate nodes store and forward messages. The more recent network coding approach, in contrast, prompts intermediate nodes to mix and code together messages. It has been shown that certain wired networks have an asymptotic network coding gap, that is, they have asymptotically higher broadcast throughput when using network coding compared to routing. Whether such a gap exists for wireless networks has been an open question of great interest. We approach this question by studying the broadcast throughput of the radio network model which has been a standard mathematical model to study wireless communication. We show that there is a family of radio networks with a tight $\Theta(\log \log n)$ network coding gap, that is, networks in which the asymptotic throughput achievable via routing messages is a $\Theta(\log \log n)$ factor smaller than that of the optimal network coding algorithm. We also provide new tight upper and lower bounds that show that the asymptotic worst-case broadcast throughput over all networks with $n$ nodes is $\Theta(1 / \log n)$ messages-per-round for both routing and network coding.
  • We study the multi-message broadcast problem using abstract MAC layer models of wireless networks. These models capture the key guarantees of existing MAC layers while abstracting away low-level details such as signal propagation and contention. We begin by studying upper and lower bounds for this problem in a {\em standard abstract MAC layer model}---identifying an interesting dependence between the structure of unreliable links and achievable time complexity. In more detail, given a restriction that devices connected directly by an unreliable link are not too far from each other in the reliable link topology, we can (almost) match the efficiency of the reliable case. For the related restriction, however, that two devices connected by an unreliable link are not too far from each other in geographic distance, we prove a new lower bound that shows that this efficiency is impossible. We then investigate how much extra power must be added to the model to enable a new order of magnitude of efficiency. In more detail, we consider an {\em enhanced abstract MAC layer model} and present a new multi-message broadcast algorithm that (under certain natural assumptions) solves the problem in this model faster than any known solutions in an abstract MAC layer setting.
  • This paper presents a near-optimal distributed approximation algorithm for the minimum-weight connected dominating set (MCDS) problem. The presented algorithm finds an $O(\log n)$ approximation in $\tilde{O}(D+\sqrt{n})$ rounds, where $D$ is the network diameter and $n$ is the number of nodes. MCDS is a classical NP-hard problem and the achieved approximation factor $O(\log n)$ is known to be optimal up to a constant factor, unless P=NP. Furthermore, the $\tilde{O}(D+\sqrt{n})$ round complexity is known to be optimal modulo logarithmic factors (for any approximation), following [Das Sarma et al.---STOC'11].
  • We study coding schemes for error correction in interactive communications. Such interactive coding schemes simulate any $n$-round interactive protocol using $N$ rounds over an adversarial channel that corrupts up to $\rho N$ transmissions. Important performance measures for a coding scheme are its maximum tolerable error rate $\rho$, communication complexity $N$, and computational complexity. We give the first coding scheme for the standard setting which performs optimally in all three measures: Our randomized non-adaptive coding scheme has a near-linear computational complexity and tolerates any error rate $\delta < 1/4$ with a linear $N = \Theta(n)$ communication complexity. This improves over prior results which each performed well in two of these measures. We also give results for other settings of interest, namely, the first computationally and communication efficient schemes that tolerate $\rho < \frac{2}{7}$ adaptively, $\rho < \frac{1}{3}$ if only one party is required to decode, and $\rho < \frac{1}{2}$ if list decoding is allowed. These are the optimal tolerable error rates for the respective settings. These coding schemes also have near linear computational and communication complexity. These results are obtained via two techniques: We give a general black-box reduction which reduces unique decoding, in various settings, to list decoding. We also show how to boost the computational and communication efficiency of any list decoder to become near linear.
  • We introduce collision free layerings as a powerful way to structure radio networks. These layerings can replace hard-to-compute BFS-trees in many contexts while having an efficient randomized distributed construction. We demonstrate their versatility by using them to provide near optimal distributed algorithms for several multi-message communication primitives. Designing efficient communication primitives for radio networks has a rich history that began 25 years ago when Bar-Yehuda et al. introduced fast randomized algorithms for broadcasting and for constructing BFS-trees. Their BFS-tree construction time was $O(D \log^2 n)$ rounds, where $D$ is the network diameter and $n$ is the number of nodes. Since then, the complexity of a broadcast has been resolved to be $T_{BC} = \Theta(D \log \frac{n}{D} + \log^2 n)$ rounds. On the other hand, BFS-trees have been used as a crucial building block for many communication primitives and their construction time remained a bottleneck for these primitives. We introduce collision free layerings that can be used in place of BFS-trees and we give a randomized construction of these layerings that runs in nearly broadcast time, that is, w.h.p. in $T_{Lay} = O(D \log \frac{n}{D} + \log^{2+\epsilon} n)$ rounds for any constant $\epsilon>0$. We then use these layerings to obtain: (1) A randomized algorithm for gathering $k$ messages running w.h.p. in $O(T_{Lay} + k)$ rounds. (2) A randomized $k$-message broadcast algorithm running w.h.p. in $O(T_{Lay} + k \log n)$ rounds. These algorithms are optimal up to the small difference in the additive poly-logarithmic term between $T_{BC}$ and $T_{Lay}$. Moreover, they imply the first optimal $O(n \log n)$ round randomized gossip algorithm.