• We combine spectroscopic measurements of H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ and UV continuum photometry for a sample of 673 galaxies from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field survey to constrain hydrogen ionizing photon production efficiencies ($\xi_{\rm ion}$, xi_ion) at z=1.4-2.6. We find average log(xi_ion/[Hz erg$^{-1}$])=25.06 (25.34), assuming the Calzetti (SMC) curve for the UV dust correction and a scatter of 0.28 dex in xi_ion distribution. After accounting for observational uncertainties and variations in dust attenuation, we conclude that the remaining scatter in xi_ion is likely dominated by galaxy-to-galaxy variations in stellar populations, including the slope and upper-mass cutoff of the initial mass function, stellar metallicity, star-formation burstiness, and stellar evolution (e.g., single/binary star evolution). Moreover, xi_ion is elevated in galaxies with high ionization states (high [OIII]/[OII]) and low oxygen abundances (low [NII]/H$\alpha$ and high [OIII]/H$\beta$) in the ionized ISM. However, xi_ion does not correlate with the offset from the z~0 star-forming locus in the BPT diagram, suggesting no change in the hardness of ionizing radiation accompanying the offset from the z~0 sequence. We also find that galaxies with blue UV spectral slopes ($\langle\beta\rangle$=-2.1) have elevated xi_ion by a factor of ~2 relative to the average xi_ion of the sample ($\langle\beta\rangle$=-1.4). If these blue galaxies are similar to those at z > 6, our results suggest that a lower Lyman continuum escape fraction is required for galaxies to maintain reionization, compared to the canonical xi_ion predictions from stellar population models. Furthermore, we demonstrate that even with robustly dust-corrected H$\alpha$, the UV dust attenuation can cause on average a ~0.3dex systematic uncertainty in xi_ion calculations.
  • We investigate the infrared contribution from supermassive black hole activity versus host galaxy emission in the mid to far-infrared (IR) spectrum for a large sample of X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) residing in dusty, star-forming host galaxies. We select 703 AGN with L_X = 10^42-46 ergs s^-1 at 0.1 < z < 5 from the Chandra XBootes X-ray Survey with rich multi-band observations in the optical to far-IR, including a required detection in the Spitzer MIPS 24 um band and at least one in a Herschel far-IR band. This is the largest sample to date of X-ray AGN with mid- and far-IR detections that uses spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition to determine intrinsic AGN and host galaxy infrared luminosities. We observe weak or nonexistent relationships when averaging star-formation luminosities in bins of AGN luminosities, but see stronger positive trends when averaging L_X in bins of star-forming luminosity for AGN at low redshifts. We determine an average dust covering factor of 33%, corresponding to a Type 2 population of roughly a third. We see no strong connection between AGN fractions in the IR and corresponding total infrared, 24 um, or X-ray luminosities. The average rest-frame AGN contribution as a function of IR wavelength shows significant (~80%) contributions in the mid-IR that trail off at lambda > 30 um. Additionally, we provide an equation relating L_X and pure AGN IR output for high-z AGN allowing future studies to estimate AGN infrared contribution using only X-ray flux density estimates.
  • We present results from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey on broad flux from the nebular emission lines H$\alpha$, [NII], [OIII], H$\beta$, and [SII]. The sample consists of 127 star-forming galaxies at $1.37 < z < 2.61$ and 84 galaxies at $2.95 < z < 3.80$. We decompose the emission lines using narrow ($\text{FWHM} < 275 \ \text{km s}^{-1}$) and broad ($\text{FWHM} > 300 \ \text{km s}^{-1}$) Gaussian components for individual galaxies and stacks. Broad emission is detected at $>3\sigma$ in $<10$% of galaxies and the broad flux accounts for 10-70% of the total flux. We find a slight increase in broad to narrow flux ratio with mass but note that we cannot reliably detect broad emission with $\text{FWHM} < 275 \ \text{km s}^{-1}$, which may be significant at low masses. Notably, there is a correlation between higher signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra and a broad component detection indicating a S/N dependence in our ability to detect broad flux. When placed on the N2-BPT diagram ([OIII]/H$\beta$ vs. [NII]/H$\alpha$) the broad components of the stacks are shifted towards higher [OIII]/H$\beta$ and [NII]/$\alpha$ ratios compared to the narrow component. We compare the location of the broad components to shock models and find that the broad component could be due to shocks, but we do not rule out other possibilities such as the presence of an AGN. We estimate the mass loading factor (mass outflow rate/star formation rate) assuming the broad component is a photoionized outflow and find that the mass loading factor increases as a function of mass which agrees with previous studies. We show that adding emission from shocked gas to $z\sim0$ SDSS spectra shifts galaxies towards the location of $z\sim2$ galaxies on several emission line diagnostic diagrams.
  • Using observations from the first two years of the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, we study 13 AGN-driven outflows detected from a sample of 67 X-ray, IR and/or optically-selected AGN at $z \sim 2$. The AGN have bolometric luminosities of $\sim10^{44}-10^{46} ~\mathrm{erg~s^{-1}}$, including both quasars and moderate-luminosity AGN. We detect blueshifted, ionized gas outflows in the H$\beta$ , [OIII], H$\alpha$ ~and/or [NII] emission lines of $19\%$ of the AGN, while only 1.8\% of the MOSDEF galaxies have similarly-detected outflows. The outflow velocities span $\sim$300 to 1000 km s$^{-1}$. Eight of the 13 outflows are spatially extended on similar scales as the host galaxies, with spatial extents of 2.5 to 11.0 kpc. Outflows are detected uniformly across the star-forming main sequence, showing little trend with the host galaxy SFR. Line ratio diagnostics indicate that the outflowing gas is photoionized by the AGN. We do not find evidence for positive AGN feedback, in either our small MOSDEF sample or a much larger SDSS sample, using the BPT diagram. Given that a galaxy with an AGN is ten times more likely to have a detected outflow, the outflowing gas is photoionzed by the AGN, and estimates of the mass and energy outflow rates indicate that stellar feedback is insufficient to drive at least some of these outflows, they are very likely to be AGN-driven. The outflows have mass-loading factors of the order of unity, suggesting that they help regulate star formation in their host galaxies, though they may be insufficient to fully quench it.
  • We present the first spectroscopic measurement of multiple rest-frame optical emission lines at $z>4$. During the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, we observed the galaxy GOODSN-17940 with the Keck I/MOSFIRE spectrograph. The K-band spectrum of GOODSN-17940 includes significant detections of the [OII]$\lambda\lambda 3726,3729$, [NeIII]$\lambda3869$, and H$\gamma$ emission lines and a tentative detection of H$\delta$, indicating $z_{\rm{spec}}=4.4121$. GOODSN-17940 is an actively star-forming $z>4$ galaxy based on its K-band spectrum and broadband spectral energy distribution. A significant excess relative to the surrounding continuum is present in the Spitzer/IRAC channel 1 photometry of GOODSN-17940, due primarily to strong H$\alpha$ emission with a rest-frame equivalent width of $\mbox{EW(H}\alpha)=1200$ \AA. Based on the assumption of $0.5 Z_{\odot}$ models and the Calzetti attenuation curve, GOODSN-17940 is characterized by $M_*=5.0^{+4.3}_{-0.2}\times 10^9 M_{\odot}$. The Balmer decrement inferred from H$\alpha$/H$\gamma$ is used to dust correct the H$\alpha$ emission, yielding $\mbox{SFR(H}\alpha)=320^{+190}_{-140} M_{\odot}\mbox{ yr}^{-1}$. These $M_*$ and SFR values place GOODSN-17940 an order of magnitude in SFR above the $z\sim 4$ star-forming "main sequence." Finally, we use the observed ratio of [NeIII]/[OII] to estimate the nebular oxygen abundance in GOODSN-17940, finding $\mbox{O/H}\sim 0.2 \mbox{ (O/H)}_{\odot}$. Combining our new [NeIII]/[OII] measurement with those from stacked spectra at $z\sim 0, 2, \mbox{ and } 3$, we show that GOODSN-17940 represents an extension to $z>4$ of the evolution towards higher [NeIII]/[OII] (i.e., lower $\mbox{O/H}$) at fixed stellar mass. It will be possible to perform the measurements presented here out to $z\sim 10$ using the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We present results on the variation of 7.7 micron Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in galaxies spanning a wide range in metallicity at z ~ 2. For this analysis, we use rest-frame optical spectra of 476 galaxies at 1.37 < z < 2.61 from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey to infer metallicities and ionization states. Spitzer/MIPS 24 micron and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 micron observations are used to derive rest-frame 7.7 micron luminosities (L(7.7)) and total IR luminosities (L(IR)), respectively. We find significant trends between the ratio of L(7.7) to L(IR) (and to dust-corrected SFR) and both metallicity and [OIII]/[OII] (O32) emission-line ratio. The latter is an empirical proxy for the ionization parameter. These trends indicate a paucity of PAH emission in low metallicity environments with harder and more intense radiation fields. Additionally, L(7.7)/L(IR) is significantly lower in the youngest quartile of our sample (ages of 500 Myr) compared to older galaxies, which may be a result of the delayed production of PAHs by AGB stars. The relative strength of L(7.7) to L(IR) is also lower by a factor of ~ 2 for galaxies with masses $M_* < 10^{10}M_{\odot}$, compared to the more massive ones. We demonstrate that commonly-used conversions of L(7.7) (or 24 micron flux density; f(24)) to L(IR) underestimate the IR luminosity by more than a factor of 2 at $M_*$ ~ $10^{9.6-10.0} M_{\odot}$. We adopt a mass-dependent conversion of L(7.7) to L(IR) with L(7.7)/L(IR)= 0.09 and 0.22 for $M_* < 10^{10}$ and $> 10^{10} M_{\odot}$, respectively. Based on the new scaling, the SFR-$M_*$ relation has a shallower slope than previously derived. Our results also suggest a higher IR luminosity density at z ~ 2 than previously measured, corresponding to a ~ 30% increase in the SFR density.
  • We present results from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey on the identification, selection biases, and host galaxy properties of 55 X-ray, IR and optically-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at $1.4 < z < 3.8$. We obtain rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies and AGN and use the BPT diagram to identify optical AGN. We examine the uniqueness and overlap of the AGN identified at different wavelengths. There is a strong bias against identifying AGN at any wavelength in low mass galaxies, and an additional bias against identifying IR AGN in the most massive galaxies. AGN hosts span a wide range of star formation rate (SFR), similar to inactive galaxies once stellar mass selection effects are accounted for. However, we find (at $\sim 2-3\sigma$ significance) that IR AGN are in less dusty galaxies with relatively higher SFR and optical AGN in dusty galaxies with relatively lower SFR. X-ray AGN selection does not display a bias with host galaxy SFR. These results are consistent with those from larger studies at lower redshifts. Within star-forming galaxies, once selection biases are accounted for, we find AGN in galaxies with similar physical properties as inactive galaxies, with no evidence for AGN activity in particular types of galaxies. This is consistent with AGN being fueled stochastically in any star-forming host galaxy. We do not detect a significant correlation between SFR and AGN luminosity for individual AGN hosts, which may indicate the timescale difference between the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes.
  • We present the first direct comparison between Balmer line and panchromatic SED-based SFRs for z~2 galaxies. For this comparison we used 17 star-forming galaxies selected from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, with $3\sigma$ detections for H$\alpha$ and at least two IR bands (Spitzer/MIPS 24$\mu$m and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160$\mu$m, and in some cases Herschel/SPIRE 250, 350, and 500$\mu$m). The galaxies have total IR (8-1000$\mu$m) luminosities of $\sim10^{11.4}-10^{12.4}\,\textrm{L}_\odot$ and star-formation rates (SFRs) of $\sim30-250\,\textrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$. We fit the UV-to-far-IR SEDs with flexible stellar population synthesis (FSPS) models - which include both stellar and dust emission - and compare the inferred SFRs with the SFR(H$\alpha$,H$\beta$) values corrected for dust attenuation using Balmer decrements. The two SFRs agree with a scatter of 0.17 dex. Our results imply that the Balmer decrement accurately predicts the obscuration of the nebular lines and can be used to robustly calculate SFRs for star-forming galaxies at z~2 with SFRs up to $\sim200\,\textrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$. We also use our data to assess SFR indicators based on modeling the UV-to-mid-IR SEDs or by adding SFR(UV) and SFR(IR), for which the latter is based on the mid-IR only or on the full IR SED. All these SFRs show a poorer agreement with SFR(H$\alpha$,H$\beta$) and in some cases large systematic biases are observed. Finally, we show that the SFR and dust attenuation derived from the UV-to-near-IR SED alone are unbiased when assuming a delayed exponentially declining star-formation history.
  • We present H$\alpha$ gas kinematics for 178 star-forming galaxies at z~2 from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field survey. We have developed models to interpret the kinematic measurements from fixed-angle multi-object spectroscopy, using structural parameters derived from CANDELS HST/F160W imaging. For 35 galaxies we measure resolved rotation with a median $(V/\sigma_{V,0})_{R_E}=2.1$. We derive dynamical masses from the kinematics and sizes and compare them to baryonic masses, with gas masses estimated from dust-corrected H$\alpha$ star formation rates (SFRs) and the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. When assuming that galaxies with and without observed rotation have the same median $(V/\sigma_{V,0})_{R_E}$, we find good agreement between the dynamical and baryonic masses, with a scatter of $\sigma_{RMS}=0.34$dex and a median offset of $\Delta\log_{10}M=0.04$dex. This comparison implies a low dark matter fraction (8% within an effective radius) for a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF), and disfavors a Salpeter IMF. Moreover, the requirement that $M_{dyn}/M_{baryon}$ should be independent of inclination yields a median value of $(V/\sigma_{V,0})_{R_E}=2.1$ for galaxies without observed rotation. If instead we treat the galaxies without detected rotation as early-type galaxies, the masses are also in reasonable agreement ($\Delta\log_{10}M=-0.07$dex, $\sigma_{RMS}=0.37$dex). The inclusion of gas masses is critical in this comparison; if gas masses are excluded there is an increasing trend of $M_{dyn}/M_{*}$ with higher specific SFR (SSFR). Furthermore, we find indications that $V/\sigma$ decreases with increasing H$\alpha$ SSFR for our full sample, which may reflect disk settling. We also study the Tully-Fisher relation and find that at fixed stellar mass $S_{0.5}=(0.5V_{2.2}^2+\sigma_{V,0}^2)^{1/2}$ was higher at earlier times. At fixed baryonic mass, we observe the opposite trend. [abridged]
  • We present results on the star-formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass ($M_*$) relation (i.e., the "main sequence") among star-forming galaxies at 1.37$\leq$$z$$\leq$2.61 using the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. Based on a sample of 261 galaxies with H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ spectroscopy, we have estimated robust dust-corrected instantaneous SFRs over a large range in $M_*$ ($\sim10^{9.5}-10^{11.5}M_\odot$). We find a correlation between log(SFR(H$\alpha$)) and log($M_*$) with a slope of 0.65$\pm$0.08 (0.58$\pm$0.10) at 1.4<z<2.6 (2.1<z<2.6). We find that different assumptions for the dust correction, such as using the color-excess of the stellar continuum to correct the nebular lines, sample selection biases against red star-forming galaxies, and not accounting for Balmer absorption can yield steeper slopes of the log(SFR)-log($M_*$) relation. Our sample is immune from these biases as it is rest-frame optically selected, H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ are corrected for Balmer absorption, and the H$\alpha$ luminosity is dust-corrected using the nebular color-excess computed from the Balmer decrement. The scatter of the log(SFR(H$\alpha$))-log($M_*$) relation, after accounting for the measurement uncertainties, is 0.31 dex at 2.1<z<2.6, which is 0.05 dex larger than the scatter in log(SFR(UV))-log($M_*$). Based on comparisons to a simulated SFR-$M_*$ relation with some intrinsic scatter, we argue that in the absence of direct measurements of galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the attenuation/extinction curves and the IMF, one cannot use the difference in the scatter of the SFR(H$\alpha$)- and SFR(UV)-$M_*$ relations to constrain the stochasticity of star formation in high-redshift galaxies.
  • We study the evidence for a connection between active galactic nuclei (AGN) fueling and star formation by investigating the relationship between the X-ray luminosities of AGN and the star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. We identify a sample of 309 AGN with $10^{41}<L_\mathrm{X}<10^{44} $ erg s$^{-1}$ at $0.2 < z < 1.2$ in the PRIMUS redshift survey. We find AGN in galaxies with a wide range of SFR at a given $L_X$. We do not find a significant correlation between SFR and the observed instantaneous $L_X$ for star forming AGN host galaxies. However, there is a weak but significant correlation between the mean $L_\mathrm{X}$ and SFR of detected AGN in star forming galaxies, which likely reflects that $L_\mathrm{X}$ varies on shorter timescales than SFR. We find no correlation between stellar mass and $L_\mathrm{X}$ within the AGN population. Within both populations of star forming and quiescent galaxies, we find a similar power-law distribution in the probability of hosting an AGN as a function of specific accretion rate. Furthermore, at a given stellar mass, we find a star forming galaxy $\sim2-3$ more likely than a quiescent galaxy to host an AGN of a given specific accretion rate. The probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN is constant across the main sequence of star formation. These results indicate that there is an underlying connection between star formation and the presence of AGN, but AGN are often hosted by quiescent galaxies.
  • In this paper we present the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. The MOSDEF survey aims to obtain moderate-resolution (R=3000-3650) rest-frame optical spectra (~3700-7000 Angstrom) for ~1500 galaxies at 1.37<z<3.80 in three well-studied CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-N. Targets are selected in three redshift intervals: 1.37<z<1.70, 2.09<z<2.61, and 2.95<z<3.80, down to fixed H_AB (F160W) magnitudes of 24.0, 24.5 and 25.0, respectively, using the photometric and spectroscopic catalogs from the 3D-HST survey. We target both strong nebular emission lines (e.g., [OII], Hbeta, [OIII], 5008, Halpha, [NII], and [SII]) and stellar continuum and absorption features (e.g., Balmer lines, Ca-II H and K, Mgb, 4000 Angstrom break). Here we present an overview of our survey, the observational strategy, the data reduction and analysis, and the sample characteristics based on spectra obtained during the first 24 nights. To date, we have completed 21 masks, obtaining spectra for 591 galaxies. For ~80% of the targets we derive a robust redshift from either emission or absorption lines. In addition, we confirm 55 additional galaxies, which were serendipitously detected. The MOSDEF galaxy sample includes unobscured star-forming, dusty star-forming, and quiescent galaxies and spans a wide range in stellar mass (~10^9-10^11.5 Msol) and star formation rate (~10^0-10^3 Msol/yr). The spectroscopically confirmed sample is roughly representative of an H-band limited galaxy sample at these redshifts. With its large sample size, broad diversity in galaxy properties, and wealth of available ancillary data, MOSDEF will transform our understanding of the stellar, gaseous, metal, dust, and black hole content of galaxies during the time when the universe was most active.