• Quantum key distribution using weak coherent states and homodyne detection is a promising candidate for practical quantum-cryptographic implementations due to its compatibility with existing telecom equipment and high detection efficiencies. However, despite the actual simplicity of the protocol, the security analysis of this method is rather involved compared to discrete-variable QKD. In this article we review the theoretical foundations of continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) with Gaussian modulation and rederive the essential relations from scratch in a pedagogical way. The aim of this paper is to be as comprehensive and self-contained as possible in order to be well intelligible even for readers with little pre-knowledge on the subject. Although the present article is a theoretical discussion of CV-QKD, its focus lies on practical implementations, taking into account various kinds of hardware imperfections and suggesting practical methods to perform the security analysis subsequent to the key exchange. Apart from a review of well known results, this manuscript presents a set of new original noise models which are helpful to get an estimate of how well a given set of hardware will perform in practice.
  • Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • We present a pilot-assisted coherent intradyne reception methodology for CV-QKD with true local oscillator. An optically phase-locked reference tone, prepared using carrier-suppressed optical single-sideband modulation, is multiplexed in polarisation and frequency to the 250 Mbaud quantum signal in order to provide optical frequency- and phase matching between quantum signal and local oscillator. Our concept allows for high symbol rates and can be operated at an extremely low excess-noise level, as validated by experimental measurements.
  • We demonstrate how adversaries with unbounded computing resources can break Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) protocols which employ a particular message authentication code suggested previously. This authentication code, featuring low key consumption, is not Information-Theoretically Secure (ITS) since for each message the eavesdropper has intercepted she is able to send a different message from a set of messages that she can calculate by finding collisions of a cryptographic hash function. However, when this authentication code was introduced it was shown to prevent straightforward Man-In-The-Middle (MITM) attacks against QKD protocols. In this paper, we prove that the set of messages that collide with any given message under this authentication code contains with high probability a message that has small Hamming distance to any other given message. Based on this fact we present extended MITM attacks against different versions of BB84 QKD protocols using the addressed authentication code; for three protocols we describe every single action taken by the adversary. For all protocols the adversary can obtain complete knowledge of the key, and for most protocols her success probability in doing so approaches unity. Since the attacks work against all authentication methods which allow to calculate colliding messages, the underlying building blocks of the presented attacks expose the potential pitfalls arising as a consequence of non-ITS authentication in QKD-postprocessing. We propose countermeasures, increasing the eavesdroppers demand for computational power, and also prove necessary and sufficient conditions for upgrading the discussed authentication code to the ITS level.
  • Cascade is an information reconciliation protocol proposed in the context of secret key agreement in quantum cryptography. This protocol allows removing discrepancies in two partially correlated sequences that belong to distant parties, connected through a public noiseless channel. It is highly interactive, thus requiring a large number of channel communications between the parties to proceed and, although its efficiency is not optimal, it has become the de-facto standard for practical implementations of information reconciliation in quantum key distribution. The aim of this work is to analyze the performance of Cascade, to discuss its strengths, weaknesses and optimization possibilities, comparing with some of the modified versions that have been proposed in the literature. When looking at all design trade-offs, a new view emerges that allows to put forward a number of guidelines and propose near optimal parameters for the practical implementation of Cascade improving performance significantly in comparison with all previous proposals.
  • We propose a scheme for quantum key distribution (QKD) in a passive optical network (PON) based on differential phase shift (DPS) coding. A centralized station including all expensive components serves many users, making it suitable for a true multi-user network in a local environment with moderate distances on the order of a few kilometers. The emphasis lies on an asymmetric design for cost effective implementation of network end points.
  • The appealing feature of quantum key distribution (QKD), from a cryptographic viewpoint, is the ability to prove the information-theoretic security (ITS) of the established keys. As a key establishment primitive, QKD however does not provide a standalone security service in its own: the secret keys established by QKD are in general then used by a subsequent cryptographic applications for which the requirements, the context of use and the security properties can vary. It is therefore important, in the perspective of integrating QKD in security infrastructures, to analyze how QKD can be combined with other cryptographic primitives. The purpose of this survey article, which is mostly centered on European research results, is to contribute to such an analysis. We first review and compare the properties of the existing key establishment techniques, QKD being one of them. We then study more specifically two generic scenarios related to the practical use of QKD in cryptographic infrastructures: 1) using QKD as a key renewal technique for a symmetric cipher over a point-to-point link; 2) using QKD in a network containing many users with the objective of offering any-to-any key establishment service. We discuss the constraints as well as the potential interest of using QKD in these contexts. We finally give an overview of challenges relative to the development of QKD technology that also constitute potential avenues for cryptographic research.
  • Single photon detectors are important for a wide range of applications each with their own specific requirements, which makes necessary the precise characterization of detectors. Here, we present a simple and accurate methodology of characterizing dark count rate, detection efficiency, and after-pulsing in single photon detectors purely based on their counting statistics. We demonstrate our new method on a custom-made, free-running single photon detector based on an InGaAs based avalanche photo diode (APD), though the methodology presented here is applicable for any type of single photon detector.
  • The ability to generate entangled photon-pairs over a broad wavelength range opens the door to the simultaneous distribution of entanglement to multiple users in a network by using centralized sources and flexible wavelength-division multiplexing schemes. Here we show the design of a metropolitan optical network consisting of tree-type access networks whereby entangled photon-pairs are distributed to any pair of users, independent of their location. The network is constructed employing commercial off-the-shelf components and uses the existing infrastructure, which allows for moderate deployment costs. We further develop a channel plan and a network-architecture design to provide a direct optical path between any pair of users, thus allowing classical and one-way quantum communication as well as entanglement distribution. This allows the simultaneous operation of multiple quantum information technologies. Finally, we present a more flexible backbone architecture that pushes away the load limitations of the original network design by extending its reach, number of users and capabilities.
  • Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) is maturing quickly. However, the current approaches to its application in optical networks make it an expensive technology. QKD networks deployed to date are designed as a collection of point-to-point, dedicated QKD links where non-neighboring nodes communicate using the trusted repeater paradigm. We propose a novel optical network model in which QKD systems share the communication infrastructure by wavelength multiplexing their quantum and classical signals. The routing is done using optical components within a metropolitan area which allows for a dynamically any-to-any communication scheme. Moreover, it resembles a commercial telecom network, takes advantage of existing infrastructure and utilizes commercial components, allowing for an easy, cost-effective and reliable deployment.
  • We derive analytical expressions for the single mode quantum field state at the individual output ports of a beam splitter when a single-photon Fock state and a coherent state are incident on the input ports. The output states turn out to be a statistical mixture between a displaced Fock state and a coherent state. Consequently we are able to find an analytical expression for the corresponding Wigner function. Because of the generality of our calculations the obtained results are valid for all passive and lossless optical four port devices. We show further how the results can be adapted to the case of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In addition we consider the case for which the single-photon Fock state is replaced with a general input state: a coherent input state displaces each general quantum state at the output port of a beam splitter with the displacement parameter being the amplitude of the coherent state.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) is the first quantum information task to reach the level of mature technology, already fit for commercialization. It aims at the creation of a secret key between authorized partners connected by a quantum channel and a classical authenticated channel. The security of the key can in principle be guaranteed without putting any restriction on the eavesdropper's power. The first two sections provide a concise up-to-date review of QKD, biased toward the practical side. The rest of the paper presents the essential theoretical tools that have been developed to assess the security of the main experimental platforms (discrete variables, continuous variables and distributed-phase-reference protocols).
  • Quantum cryptographic technology (QCT) is expected to be a fundamental technology for realizing long-term information security even against as-yet-unknown future technologies. More advanced security could be achieved using QCT together with contemporary cryptographic technologies. To develop and spread the use of QCT, it is necessary to standardize devices, protocols, and security requirements and thus enable interoperability in a multi-vendor, multi-network, and multi-service environment. This report is a technical summary of QCT and related topics from the viewpoints of 1) consensual establishment of specifications and requirements of QCT for standardization and commercialization and 2) the promotion of research and design to realize New-Generation Quantum Cryptography.
  • A Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) network is an infrastructure capable of performing long-distance and high-rate secret key agreement with information-theoretic security. In this paper we study security properties of QKD networks based on trusted repeater nodes. Such networks can already be deployed, based on current technology. We present an example of a trusted repeater QKD network, developed within the SECOQC project. The main focus is put on the study of secure key agreement over a trusted repeater QKD network, when some nodes are corrupted. We propose an original method, able to ensure the authenticity and privacy of the generated secret keys.
  • The European Space Agency (ESA) has supported a range of studies in the field of quantum physics and quantum information science in space for several years, and consequently we have submitted the mission proposal Space-QUEST (Quantum Entanglement for Space Experiments) to the European Life and Physical Sciences in Space Program. We propose to perform space-to-ground quantum communication tests from the International Space Station (ISS). We present the proposed experiments in space as well as the design of a space based quantum communication payload.
  • A Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) network is currently implemented in Vienna by integrating seven QKD-Link devices that connect five subsidiaries of SIEMENS Austria. We give an architectural overview of the network and present the enabling QKD-technologies, as well as the novel QKD network protocols.
  • In this paper we address a general parameter estimation methodology for an extended biokinetic degradation model [1] for poorly degradable micropollutants. In particular we concentrate on parameter estimation of the micropollutant degradation sub-model by specialised microorganisms. In this case we focus on the case when only substrate degradation data are available and prove the structural identifiability of the model. Further we consider the problem of practical identifiability and propose experimental and related numerical methods for unambiguous parameter estimation based on multiple substrate degradation curves with different initial concentrations. Finally by means of simulated pseudo-experiments we have found convincing indications that the proposed algorithm is stable and yields appropriate parameter estimates even in unfavourable regimes.