• Observational efforts to image the immediate environment of a black hole at the scale of the event horizon benefit from the development of efficient imaging codes that are capable of producing synthetic data, which may be compared with observational data. We aim to present RAPTOR, a new public code that produces accurate images, animations, and spectra of relativistic plasmas in strong gravity by numerically integrating the equations of motion of light rays and performing time-dependent radiative transfer calculations along the rays. The code is compatible with any analytical or numerical spacetime. It is hardware-agnostic and may be compiled and run both on GPUs and CPUs. We describe the algorithms used in RAPTOR and test the code's performance. We have performed a detailed comparison of RAPTOR output with that of other radiative-transfer codes and demonstrate convergence of the results. We then applied RAPTOR to study accretion models of supermassive black holes, performing time-dependent radiative transfer through general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (GRMHD) simulations and investigating the expected observational differences between the so-called fast-light and slow-light paradigms. Using RAPTOR to produce synthetic images and light curves of a GRMHD model of an accreting black hole, we find that the relative difference between fast-light and slow-light light curves is less than 5%. Using two distinct radiative-transfer codes to process the same data, we find integrated flux densities with a relative difference less than 0.01%. For two-dimensional GRMHD models, such as those examined in this paper, the fast-light approximation suffices as long as errors of a few percent are acceptable. The convergence of the results of two different codes demonstrates that they are, at a minimum, consistent.
  • The observed spectral energy distribution of an accreting supermassive black hole typically forms a power-law spectrum in the Near Infrared (NIR) and optical wavelengths, that may be interpreted as a signature of accelerated electrons along the jet. However, the details of acceleration remain uncertain. In this paper, we study the radiative properties of jets produced in axisymmetric GRMHD simulations of hot accretion flows onto underluminous supermassive black holes both numerically and semi-analytically, with the aim of investigating the differences between models with and without accelerated electrons inside the jet. We assume that electrons are accelerated in the jet regions of our GRMHD simulation. To model them, we modify the electrons' distribution function in the jet regions from a purely relativistic thermal distribution to a combination of a relativistic thermal distribution and the $\kappa$-distribution function. Inside the disk, we assume a thermal distribution for the electrons. We calculate jet spectra and synchrotron maps by using the ray tracing code {\tt RAPTOR}, and compare the synthetic observations to observations of Sgr~A*. Finally, we compare numerical models of jets to semi-analytical ones. We find that in the $\kappa$-jet models, the radio-emitting region size, radio flux, and spectral index in NIR/optical bands increase for decreasing values of the $\kappa$ parameter, which corresponds to a larger amount of accelerated electrons. The model with $\kappa = 3.5$, $\eta_{\rm acc}=5-10\%$ (the percentage of electrons that are accelerated), and observing angle $i = 30^{\rm o}$ fits the observed Sgr~A* emission in the flaring state from the radio to the NIR/optical regimes, while $\kappa = 3.5$, $\eta_{\rm acc}< 1\%$, and observing angle $i = 30^{\rm o}$ fit the upper limits in quiescence.
  • We present the black hole accretion code (BHAC), a new multidimensional general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics module for the MPI-AMRVAC framework. BHAC has been designed to solve the equations of ideal general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in arbitrary spacetimes and exploits adaptive mesh refinement techniques with an efficient block-based approach. Several spacetimes have already been implemented and tested. We demonstrate the validity of BHAC by means of various one-, two-, and three-dimensional test problems, as well as through a close comparison with the HARM3D code in the case of a torus accreting onto a black hole. The convergence of a turbulent accretion scenario is investigated with several diagnostics and we find accretion rates and horizon-penetrating fluxes to be convergent to within a few percent when the problem is run in three dimensions. Our analysis also involves the study of the corresponding thermal synchrotron emission, which is performed by means of a new general-relativistic radiative transfer code, BHOSS. The resulting synthetic intensity maps of accretion onto black holes are found to be convergent with increasing resolution and are anticipated to play a crucial role in the interpretation of horizon-scale images resulting from upcoming radio observations of the source at the Galactic Center.
  • Non-VLBI measurements of Faraday rotation at mm wavelengths have been used to constrain mass accretion rates ($\mdot$) onto supermassive black holes in the centre of the Milky Way and in the centre of M87. We constructed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics models for these sources that qualitatively well describe their spectra and radio/mm images invoking a coupled jet-disk system. Using general relativistic polarized radiative transfer, we now also model the observed mm rotation measure (RM) of M87. The models are tied to the observed radio flux, however, electron temperature and accretion rate are degenerate parameters and are allowed to vary. For the inferred low viewing angles of the M87 jet, the RM is low even as the black hole $\mdot$ increases by a factor of $\simeq100$. In jet-dominated models, the observed linear polarization is produced in the forward-jet, while the dense accretion disk depolarizes the bulk of the near-horizon scale emission which originates in the counter-jet. In the jet-dominated models, with increasing $\mdot$ and increasing Faraday optical depth one is progressively sensitive only to polarized emission in the forward-jet, keeping the measured RM relatively constant. The jet-dominated model reproduces a low net-polarization of $\simeq1$ per cent and RMs in agreement with observed values due to Faraday depolarization, however, with $\mdot$ much larger than the previously inferred limit of $9\times10^{-4}\,\mdotu$. All jet-dominated models produce much higher RMs for inclination angles $i\gtrsim30^\circ$, where the line-of-sight passes through the accretion flow, thereby providing independent constraints on the viewing geometry of the M87 jet.
  • We propose a new technique for radio interferometry to obtain super-resolution full polarization images in all four Stokes parameters using sparse modeling. The proposed technique reconstructs the image in each Stokes parameter from the corresponding full-complex Stokes visibilities by utilizing two regularization functions: the $\ell _1$-norm and total variation (TV) of the brightness distribution. As an application of this technique, we present simulated linear polarization observations of two physically motivated models of M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). We confirm that $\ell _1$+TV regularization can achieve an optimal resolution of $\sim 25-30$\% of the diffraction limit $\lambda/D_{\rm max}$, which is the nominal spatial resolution of a radio interferometer for both the total intensity (i.e. Stokes $I$) and linear polarizations (i.e. Stokes $Q$ and $U$). This optimal resolution is better than that obtained from the widely used Cotton-Schwab CLEAN algorithm or from using $\ell _1$ or TV regularizations alone. Furthermore, we find that $\ell _1$+TV regularization can achieve much better image fidelity in linear polarization than other techniques over a wide range of spatial scales, not only in the super-resolution regime, but also on scales larger than the diffraction limit. Our results clearly demonstrate that sparse reconstruction is a useful choice for high-fidelity full-polarimetric interferometric imaging.
  • We propose a new imaging technique for radio and optical/infrared interferometry. The proposed technique reconstructs the image from the visibility amplitude and closure phase, which are standard data products of short-millimeter very long baseline interferometers such as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and optical/infrared interferometers, by utilizing two regularization functions: the $\ell_1$-norm and total variation (TV) of the brightness distribution. In the proposed method, optimal regularization parameters, which represent the sparseness and effective spatial resolution of the image, are derived from data themselves using cross validation (CV). As an application of this technique, we present simulated observations of M87 with the EHT based on four physically motivated models. We confirm that $\ell_1$+TV regularization can achieve an optimal resolution of $\sim 20-30$% of the diffraction limit $\lambda/D_{\rm max}$, which is the nominal spatial resolution of a radio interferometer. With the proposed technique, the EHT can robustly and reasonably achieve super-resolution sufficient to clearly resolve the black hole shadow. These results make it promising for the EHT to provide an unprecedented view of the event-horizon-scale structure in the vicinity of the super-massive black hole in M87 and also the Galactic center Sgr A*.
  • Compact radio cores associated with relativistic jets are often observed in both active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries. Their radiative properties follow some general scaling laws which primarily depend on their masses and accretion rates. However, it has been suggested that the black hole spin can also strongly influence the power and radio flux of these. Here, we attempt to estimate the dependency of the radio luminosity of steady jets launched by accretion disks on black hole mass, accretion rate and spin using numerical simulations. We make use of 3D GRMHD simulations of accretion disks around low-luminosity black holes in which the jet radio emission is produced by the jet sheath. We find that the radio flux increases roughly by a factor of 6 as the back hole spin increases from a~0 to a=0.98. This is comparable to the increase in accretion power with spin, meaning that the ratio between radio jet and accretion power is hardly changing. Although our jet spine power scales as expected for the Blandford-Znajek process, the dependency of jet radio luminosity on the black hole spin is somewhat weaker. Also weakly rotating black holes can produce visible radio jets. The overall scaling of the radio emission with black hole mass and accretion rate is consistent with the scale-invariant analytical models used to explain the fundamental plane of black hole activity. Spin does not introduce a significant scatter in this model. The jet-sheath model can describe well resolved accreting systems, such as SgrA* and M87, as well as the general scaling behavior of low-luminosity black holes. Hence the model should be applicable to a wide range of radio jets in sub-Eddington black holes. The black hole spin has an effect on the production of visible radio jet, but it may not be the main driver to produce visible radio jets. An extension of our findings to powerful quasars remains speculative.
  • We present the results of a closure phase analysis of 3 mm very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements performed on Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We have analyzed observations made in May 2015 using the Very Long Baseline Array, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano and obtained non-zero closure phase measurements on several station triangles - indicative of a non-point-symmetric source structure. The data are fitted with an asymmetric source structure model in Sgr A*, represented by a simple two-component model, which favours a fainter component due East of the main source. This result is discussed in light of a scattering screen with substructure or an intrinsically asymmetric source.
  • (abridged) The connection between black hole, accretion disk, and radio jet can be best constrained by fitting models to observations of nearby low luminosity galactic nuclei, in particular the well studied sources Sgr~A* and M87. There has been considerable progress in modeling the central engine of active galactic nuclei by an accreting supermassive black hole coupled to a relativistic plasma jet. However, can a single model be applied to a range of black hole masses and accretion rates? Here we want to compare the latest three-dimensional numerical model, originally developed for Sgr A* in the center of the Milky Way, to radio observations of the much more powerful and more massive black hole in M87. We postprocess three-dimensional GRMHD models of a jet-producing radiatively inefficient accretion flow around a spinning black hole using relativistic radiative transfer and ray-tracing to produce model spectra and images. As a key new ingredient to these models, we allow the proton-electron coupling in these simulations depend on the magnetic properties of the plasma. We find that the radio emission in M87 is well described by a combination of a two-temperature accretion flow and a hot single-temperature jet. The model fits the basic observed characteristics of the M87 radio core. The best fit model has a mass-accretion rate of Mdot approx 9x10^{-3} MSUN/YR and a total jet power of P_j \sim 10^{43} erg/s. Emission at 1.3mm is produced by the counter jet close to the event horizon. Its characteristic crescent shape surrounding the black hole shadow could be resolved by future millimeter-wave VLBI experiments. The model was successfully derived from one for the supermassive black hole in center of the Milky Way by appropriately scaling mass and accretion rate. This suggests the possibility that this model could also apply to a larger range of low-luminosity black holes.
  • We measure the proper motion of the pulsar PSR J1745-2900 relative to the Galactic Center massive black hole, Sgr A*, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The pulsar has a transverse velocity of 236 +/- 11 km s^-1 at position angle 22 +/- 2 deg East of North at a projected separation of 0.097 pc from Sgr A*. Given the unknown radial velocity, this transverse velocity measurement does not conclusively prove that the pulsar is bound to Sgr A*; however, the probability of chance alignment is very small. We do show that the velocity and position is consistent with a bound orbit originating in the clockwise disk of massive stars orbiting Sgr A* and a natal velocity kick of <~ 500 km s^-1. An origin among the isotropic stellar cluster is possible but less probable. If the pulsar remains radio-bright, multi-year astrometry of PSR J1745-2900 can detect its acceleration and determine the full three-dimensional orbit. We also demonstrate that PSR J1745-2900 exhibits the same angular broadening as Sgr A* over a wavelength range of 3.6 cm to 0.7 cm, further confirming that the two sources share the same interstellar scattering properties. Finally, we place the first limits on the presence of a wavelength-dependent shift in the position of Sgr A*, i.e., the core shift, one of the expected properties of optically-thick jet emission. Our results for PSR J1745-2900 support the hypothesis that Galactic Center pulsars will originate from the stellar disk and deepens the mystery regarding the small number of detected Galactic Center pulsars.
  • The Galactic Center black hole Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is a prime observing target for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), which can resolve the 1.3 mm emission from this source on angular scales comparable to that of the general relativistic shadow. Previous EHT observations have used visibility amplitudes to infer the morphology of the millimeter-wavelength emission. Potentially much richer source information is contained in the phases. We report on 1.3 mm phase information on Sgr A* obtained with the EHT on a total of 13 observing nights over 4 years. Closure phases, the sum of visibility phases along a closed triangle of interferometer baselines, are used because they are robust against phase corruptions introduced by instrumentation and the rapidly variable atmosphere. The median closure phase on a triangle including telescopes in California, Hawaii, and Arizona is nonzero. This result conclusively demonstrates that the millimeter emission is asymmetric on scales of a few Schwarzschild radii and can be used to break 180-degree rotational ambiguities inherent from amplitude data alone. The stability of the sign of the closure phase over most observing nights indicates persistent asymmetry in the image of Sgr A* that is not obscured by refraction due to interstellar electrons along the line of sight.
  • Radio and mm-wavelength observations of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the radio source associated with the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, show that it behaves as a partially self-absorbed synchrotron-emitting source. The measured size of Sgr A* shows that the mm-wavelength emission comes from a small region and consists of the inner accretion flow and a possible collimated outflow. Existing observations of Sgr A* have revealed a time lag between light curves at 43 GHz and 22 GHz, which is consistent with a rapidly expanding plasma flow and supports the presence of a collimated outflow from the environment of an accreting black hole. Here we wish to measure simultaneous frequency-dependent time lags in the light curves of Sgr A* across a broad frequency range to constrain direction and speed of the radio-emitting plasma in the vicinity of the black hole. Light curves of Sgr A* were taken in May 2012 using ALMA at 100 GHz using the VLA at 48, 39, 37, 27, 25.5, and 19 GHz. As a result of elevation limits and the longitude difference between the stations, the usable overlap in the light curves is approximately four hours. Although Sgr A* was in a relatively quiet phase, the high sensitivity of ALMA and the VLA allowed us to detect and fit maxima of an observed minor flare where flux density varied by ~10%. The fitted times of flux density maxima at frequencies from 100 GHz to 19 GHz, as well as a cross-correlation analysis, reveal a simple frequency-dependent time lag relation where maxima at higher frequencies lead those at lower frequencies. Taking the observed size-frequency relation of Sgr A* into account, these time lags suggest a moderately relativistic (lower estimates: 0.5c for two-sided, 0.77c for one-sided) collimated outflow.
  • Radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs) are believed to power supermassive black holes (SMBH) in the underluminous cores of galaxies. Such black holes are typically accompanied by flat-spectrum radio cores indicating the presence of moderately relativistic jets. One of the best constrained RIAFs is associated with the SMBH in the Galactic center, Sgr A*. Since the plasma in RIAFs is only weakly collisional, the dynamics and the radiative properties of these systems are very uncertain. Here we want to study the impact of varying electron temperature on the appearance of accretion flows and jets. Using 3-D GRMHD accretion flow simulations, we use ray tracing methods to predict spectra and radio images of RIAFs allowing for different electron heating mechanisms in the in- and outflowing parts of the simulations. We find that small changes in the electron temperature can result in dramatic differences in the relative dominance of jets and accretion flows. Application to Sgr A* shows that radio spectrum and size of this source can be well reproduced with a model where electrons are more efficiently heated in the jet. The X-ray emission is sensitive to the electron heating mechanism in the jets and disk and therefore X-ray observations put strong constraints on electron temperatures and geometry of the accretion flow and jet. For Sgr A*, the jet model also predicts a significant frequency-dependent core shift which could place independent constraints on the model once measured accurately. We conclude that more sophisticated models for electron distribution functions are crucial for constraining GRMHD simulations with actual observations. For Sgr A*, the radio appearance may well be dominated by the outflowing plasma. Nonetheless, at the highest radio frequencies, the shadow of the event horizon should still be detectable with future Very Long Baseline Interferometric observations.
  • We calculate the structure and short-term evolution of a gamma ray burst central engine in the form of a turbulent torus accreting onto a stellar mass black hole. Our models apply to the short gamma ray burst events, in which a remnant torus forms after the neutron star-black hole or a double neutron star merger and is subsequently accreted. We study the 2-dimensional, relativistic models and concentrate on the effects of black hole and flow parameters as well as the neutrino cooling. We compare the resulting structure and neutrino emission to the results of our previous 1-dimensional simulations. We find that the neutrino cooled torus launches a powerful mass outflow, which contributes to the total neutrino luminosity and mass loss from the system. The neutrino luminosity may exceed the Blandford-Znajek luminosity of the polar jets and the subsequent annihilation of neutrino-antineutrino pairs will provide an additional source of power to the GRB emission.
  • In accretion-based models for Sgr A* the X-ray, infrared, and millimeter emission arise in a hot, geometrically thick accretion flow close to the black hole. The spectrum and size of the source depend on the black hole mass accretion rate $\dot{M}$. Since Gillessen et al. have recently discovered a cloud moving toward Sgr A* that will arrive in summer 2013, $\dot{M}$ may increase from its present value $\dot{M}_0$. We therefore reconsider the "best-bet" accretion model of Moscibrodzka et al., which is based on a general relativistic MHD flow model and fully relativistic radiative transfer, for a range of $\dot{M}$. We find that for modest increases in $\dot{M}$ the characteristic ring of emission due to the photon orbit becomes brighter, more extended, and easier to detect by the planned Event Horizon Telescope submm VLBI experiment. If $\dot{M} \gtrsim 8 \dot{M}_0$ this "silhouette of the black hole will be hidden beneath the synchrotron photosphere at 230 GHz, and for $\dot{M} \gtrsim 16 \dot{M}_0$ the silhouette is hidden at 345 GHz. We also find that for $\dot{M} > 2 \dot{M}_0$ the near-horizon accretion flow becomes a persistent X-ray and mid-infrared source, and in the near-infrared Sgr A* will acquire a persistent component that is brighter than currently observed flares.
  • Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) are the extremely energetic transient events, visible from the most distant parts of the Universe. They are most likely powered by accretion on the hyper-Eddington rates that proceeds onto a newly born stellar mass black hole. This central engine gives rise to the most powerful, high Lorentz factor jets that are responsible for energetic gamma ray emission. We investigate the accretion flow evolution in GRB central engine, using the 2D MHD simulations in General Relativity. We compute the structure and evolution of the extremely hot and dense torus accreting onto the fast spinning black hole, which launches the magnetized jets. We calculate the chemical structure of the disk and account for neutrino cooling. Our preliminary runs apply to the short GRB case (remnant torus accreted after NS-NS or NS-BH merger). We estimate the neutrino luminosity of such an event for chosen disk and central BH mass
  • Electron-positron pairs may be produced near accreting black holes by a variety of physical processes, and the resulting pair plasma may be accelerated and collimated into a relativistic jet. Here we use a self-consistent dynamical and radiative model to investigate pair production by \gamma\gamma collisions in weakly radiative accretion flows around a black hole of mass M and accretion rate \dot{M}. Our flow model is drawn from general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and our radiation field is computed by a Monte Carlo transport scheme assuming the electron distribution function is thermal. We argue that the pair production rate scales as r^{-6} M^{-1} \dot{M}^{6}. We confirm this numerically and calibrate the scaling relation. This relation is self-consistent in a wedge in M, \dot{M} parameter space. If \dot{M} is too low the implied pair density over the poles of the black hole is below the Goldreich-Julian density and \gamma\gamma pair production is relatively unimportant; if \dot{M} is too high the models are radiatively efficient. We also argue that for a power-law spectrum the pair production rate should scale with the observables L_X \equiv X-ray luminosity and M as L_X^2 M^{-4}. We confirm this numerically and argue that this relation likely holds even for radiatively efficient flows. The pair production rates are sensitive to black hole spin and to the ion-electron temperature ratio which are fixed in this exploratory calculation. We finish with a brief discussion of the implications for Sgr A* and M87.
  • Using flow models based on axisymmetric general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) simulations, we construct radiative models for sgr A*. Spectral energy distributions that include the effects of thermal synchrotron emission and absorption, and Compton scattering, are calculated using a Monte Carlo technique. Images are calculated using a ray-tracing scheme. All models are scaled so that the 230 GHz flux density is 3.4 Jy. The key model parameters are the dimensionless black hole spin a*, the inclination i, and the ion-to-electron temperature ratio Ti/Te. We find that: (1) models with Ti/Te=1 are inconsistent with the observed submillimeter spectral slope; (2) the X-ray flux is a strongly increasing function of a*; (3) the X-ray flux is a strongly increasing function of i; (4) 230 GHz image size is a complicated function of i, a*, and Ti/Te, but the Ti/Te = 10 models are generally large and at most marginally consistent with the 230 GHz VLBI data; (5) for models with Ti/Te=10 and i=85 deg the event horizon is cloaked behind a synchrotron photosphere at 230 GHz and will not be seen by VLBI, but these models overproduce NIR and X-ray flux; (6) in all models whose SEDs are consistent with observations the event horizon is uncloaked at 230 GHz; (7) the models that are most consistent with the observations have a* \sim 0.9. We finish with a discussion of the limitations of our model and prospects for future improvements.
  • We describe a Monte Carlo radiative transport code intended for calculating spectra of hot, optically thin plasmas in full general relativity. The version we describe here is designed to model hot accretion flows in the Kerr metric and therefore incorporates synchrotron emission and absorption, and Compton scattering. The code can be readily generalized, however, to account for other radiative processes and an arbitrary spacetime. We describe a suite of test problems, and demonstrate the expected $N^{-1/2}$ convergence rate, where $N$ is the number of Monte Carlo samples. Finally we illustrate the capabilities of the code with a model calculation, a spectrum of the slowly accreting black hole Sgr A* based on data provided by a numerical general relativistic MHD model of the accreting plasma.
  • We study how axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) accretion flows depend on gamma adiabatic index in the polytropic equation of state. This work is an extension of Moscibrodzka & Proga (2008), where we investigated the gamma dependence of 2-D Bondi-like accretion flows in the hydrodynamical (HD) limit. Our main goal is to study if simulations for various gamma can give us insights into to the problem of various modes of accretion observed in several types of accretion systems such as black hole binaries (BHB), active galactic nuclei (AGN), and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We find that for gamma >~ 4/3, the fast rotating flow forms a thick torus that is supported by rotation and gas pressure. As shown before for gamma=5/3, such a torus produces a strong, persistent bipolar outflow that can significantly reduce the polar funnel accretion of a slowly rotating flow. For low gamma, close to 1, the torus is thin and is supported by rotation. The thin torus produces an unsteady outflow which is too weak to propagate throughout the polar funnel inflow. Compared to their HD counterparts, the MHD simulations show that the magnetized torus can produce an outflow and does not exhibit regular oscillations. Generally, our simulations demonstrate how the torus thickness affects the outflow production. They also support the notion that the geometrical thickness of the torus correlates with the power of the torus outflow. Our results, applied to observations, suggest that the torus ability to radiatively cool and become thin can correspond to a suppression of a jet as observed in the BHB during a transition from a hard/low to soft/high spectral state and a transition from a quiescent to hard/low state in AGN.
  • We report on next phase of our study of rotating accretion flows onto black holes. We consider hydrodynamical (HD) accretion flows with a spherically symmetric density distribution at the outer boundary but with spherical symmetry broken by the introduction of a small, latitude-dependent angular momentum. We study accretion flows by means of numerical two-dimensional, axisymmetric, HD simulations for variety of the adiabatic index, $\gamma$ and the gas temperature at infinity, $c_\infty$. Our work is an extension of work done by Proga & Begelman who consider models for only $\gamma=5/3$. Our main result is that the flow properties such as the topology of the sonic surface and time behavior strongly depend on $\gamma$ but little on $c_\infty$. In particular, for $1 < \gamma < 5/3$, the mass accretion rate shows large amplitude, slow time-variability which is a result of mixing between slow and fast rotating gas. This temporal behavior differs significantly from that in models with $\gamma\simless 5/3$ where the accretion rate is relatively constant and from that in models with $\gamma\simgreat 1$ where the accretion exhibits small amplitude quasi-periodic oscillations. The key parameter responsible for the differences is the sound speed of the accretion flow which in turn determines whether the flow is dominated by gas pressure, radiation pressure or rotation. Despite these differences the time-averaged mass accretion rate in units of the corresponding Bondi rate is a weak function of $\gamma$ and $c_\infty$.
  • Numerical simulations of MHD accretion flows in the vicinity of a supermasssive black hole provide important insights to the problem of why and how systems -- such as the Galactic Center -- are underluminous and variable. To access applicability of such flows to real objects, we examine the dynamical MHD studies with computations of the time dependent radiation spectra predicted by the simulations. We apply Monte Carlo methods to calculate spectra predicted by the time-dependent model of an axisymmetic MHD flow accreting onto a black hole presented by Proga and Begelman. Our calculations show that variability in an accretion flow is not always reflected in the corresponding spectra, at least not in all wavelengths. We find no one-to-one correspondence between the accretion state and the predicted spectrum
  • The material accreting onto Sgr A* most probably comes from the nearby stars. We analyze the pattern of this flow at distances of a fraction of a parsec and we argue that the net angular momentum of this material is low but non-negligible, and the initially supersonic disk accretion changes into subsonic flow with constant angular momentum. Next we estimate the flow parameters at a distance $R_{BHL}$ from the black hole and we argue that for the plausible parameter range the accretion flow is non-stationary. The inflow becomes supersonic at distance of $\sim 10^4 R_g$ but the solution does not continue below the horizon and the material piles up forming a torus, or a ring, at a distance of a few up to tens of Schwarzchild radii. Such a torus is known to be unstable and may explain strong variability of the flow in Sgr A*. Our considerations show that the temporary formation of such a torus seems to be unavoidable. Our best fitting model predicts a rather large accretion rate of around $4 \cdot 10^{-6} M_{\odot}/yr$ directly on Sgr A*. We argue that magnetic fields in the flow are tangled and this allows our model to overcome the disagreement with the Faraday rotation limits.