• We present spectroscopic identification of 41 new quasars and luminous galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the fourth in a series of papers presenting the results of the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the deep multi-band imaging data produced by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program survey. The photometric candidates were selected by a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm, and then observed with spectrographs on the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope. Combined with the sample presented in the previous papers, we have now spectroscopically identified 137 extremely-red HSC sources over about 650 deg2, which include 64 high-z quasars, 24 high-z luminous galaxies, 6 [O III] emitters at z ~ 0.8, and 43 Galactic cool dwarfs (low-mass stars and brown dwarfs). The new quasars span the luminosity range from M1450 ~ -26 to -22 mag, and continue to populate a few magnitude lower luminosities than have been probed by previous wide-field surveys. In a companion paper, we derive the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 6 over an unprecedentedly wide range of M1450 ~ -28 to -21 mag, exploiting the SHELLQs and other survey outcomes.
  • We present the detailed optical to far-infrared observations of SST J1604+4304, an ULIRG at z = 1.135. Analyzing the stellar absorption lines, namely, the CaII H & K and Balmer H lines in the optical spectrum, we derive the upper limits of an age for the stellar population. Given this constraint, the minimum {chi}^2 method is used to fit the stellar population models to the observed SED from 0.44 to 5.8um. We find the following properties. The stellar population has an age 40 - 200 Myr with a metallicity 2.5 Z_{sun}. The starlight is reddened by E(B-V) = 0.8. The reddening is caused by the foreground dust screen, indicating that dust is depleted in the starburst site and the starburst site is surrounded by a dust shell. The infrared (8-1000um) luminosity is L_{ir} = 1.78 +/- 0.63 * 10^{12} L_{sun}. This is two times greater than that expected from the observed starlight, suggesting either that 1/2 of the starburst site is completely obscured at UV-optical wavelengths, or that 1/2 of L_{ir} comes from AGN emission. The inferred dust mass is 2.0 +/- 1.0 * 10^8 M_{sun}. This is sufficient to form a shell surrounding the galaxy with an optical depth E(B-V) = 0.8. From our best stellar population model - an instantaneous starburst with an age 40 Myr, we infer the rate of 19 supernovae(SNe) per year. Simply analytical models imply that 2.5 Z_{sun} in stars was reached when the gas mass reduced to 30% of the galaxy mass. The gas metallcity is 4.8 Z_{sun} at this point. The gas-to-dust mass ratio is then 120 +/- 73. The inferred dust production rate is 0.24 +/- 0.12 M_{sun} per SN. If 1/2 of L_{ir} comes from AGN emission, the rate is 0.48 +/- 0.24 M_{sun} per SN. We discuss the evolutionary link of SST J1604+4304 to other galaxy populations in terms of the stellar masses and the galactic winds.
  • We present the optical to near-infrared (IR) spectrum of the galaxy TSPS J1329-0957, a red and bright member of the class of extremely red objects (EROs) at z = 1.26. This galaxy was found in the course of the Tokyo-Stromlo Photometry Survey (TSPS) which we are conducting in the southern sky. The spectroscopic observations were carried out with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) and the Gemini Near Infra-Red Spectrograph (GNIRS) mounted on the Gemini-South telescope. The wide wavelength coverage of 0.6 - 2.3 um provides useful clues as to the nature of EROs while most published spectra are limited to a narrower spectral range which is dictated by the need for efficient redshift determination in a large survey. We compare our spectrum with several optical composite spectra obtained in recent large surveys, and with stellar population synthesis models. The effectiveness of using near-IR broad-band data, instead of the spectral data, in deriving the galaxy properties are also investigated. We find that TSPS J1329-0957 formed when the universe was 2 - 3 Gyr old, and subsequently evolved passively to become one of the most massive galaxies found in the z = 1 - 2 universe. Its early type and estimated stellar mass of M* = 10^{11.5} Msun clearly point to this galaxy being a direct ancestor of the brightest elliptical and spheroidal galaxies in the local universe.