• This work is part of a series of studies focusing on the environment and the properties of the X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) population from the XXL survey. The present survey, given its large area, continuity, extensive multiwavelength coverage, and large-scale structure information, is ideal for this kind of study. Here, we focus on the XXL-South (XXL-S) field. Our main aim is to study the environment of the various types of X-ray selected AGN and investigate its possible role in AGN triggering and evolution. We studied the large-scale (>1 Mpc) environment up to redshift z=1 using the nearest neighbour distance method to compare various pairs of AGN types. We also investigated the small-scale environment (<0.4 Mpc) by calculating the local overdensities of optical galaxies. In addition, we built a catalogue of AGN concentrations with two or more members using the hierarchical clustering method and we correlated them with the X-ray galaxy clusters detected in the XXL survey. It is found that radio detected X-ray sources are more obscured than non-radio ones, though not all radio sources are obscured AGN. We did not find any significant differences in the large-scale clustering between luminous and faint X-ray AGN, or between obscured and unobscured ones, or between radio and non-radio sources. At local scales (<0.4 Mpc), AGN typically reside in overdense regions, compared to non-AGN; however, no differences were found between the various types of AGN. A majority of AGN concentrations with two or more members are found in the neighbourhood of X-ray galaxy clusters within <25-45 Mpc. Our results suggest that X-ray AGN are typically located in supercluster filaments, but they are also found in over- and underdense regions.
  • The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • We examine the behaviour of the infrared-radio correlation (IRRC) over the range $0<z<6$ using new, highly sensitive 3GHz observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and infrared data from the Herschel Space Observatory in the 2deg$^{2}$ COSMOS field. We distinguish between objects where emission is believed to arise solely from star-formation, and those where an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is thought to be present. We account for non-detections in the radio or in the infrared using a doubly-censored survival analysis. We find that the IRRC of star-forming galaxies, quantified by the infrared-to-1.4GHz radio luminosity ratio ($q_{\rm TIR}$), decreases with increasing redshift: $q_{\rm TIR}(z)=(2.88\pm0.03)(1+z)^{-0.19\pm0.01}$. Moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN do not follow the same $q_{\rm TIR}$$(z)$ trend, having a lower normalisation and steeper decrease with redshift. We cannot rule out the possibility that unidentified AGN contributions only to the radio regime may be steepening the observed $q_{\rm TIR}(z)$ trend of the star-forming population. An increasing fractional contribution to the observed 3GHz flux by free-free emission of star-forming galaxies may also affect the derived evolution. However, we find that the standard (M82-based) assumption of the typical radio spectral energy distribution (SED) for star-forming galaxies is inconsistent with our results. This suggests a more complex shape of the typical radio SED for star-forming galaxies, and that imperfect $K$ corrections in the radio may govern the derived redshift trend of $q_{\rm TIR}$. Lastly, we present a redshift-dependent relation between rest-frame 1.4GHz radio luminosity and star formation rate taking the derived redshift trend into account.
  • (abridged) We study the composition of the faint radio population selected from the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project. The survey covers a 2.6sq.deg. area with a mean rms of ~2.3uJy/b, cataloging 10830 sources (>5sigma). Combining these radio data with optical, near-infrared (UltraVISTA), mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) data, and X-ray data (Chandra), we find counterparts to radio sources for ~93% of the radio sample (in the areas of the COSMOS field not affected by saturated or bright sources in the optical to NIR bands), reaching out to z<6. We further classify the sources as star forming galaxies or AGN based on various criteria, such as X-ray luminosity, observed MIR color, UV-FIR spectral-energy distribution, rest-frame NUV-optical color corrected for dust extinction, and radio-excess relative to that expected from the hosts' star-formation rate. We separate the AGN into sub-samples dominated by low-to-moderate and moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN, candidates for high-redshift analogues to local low- and high-excitation emission line AGN, respectively. We study the fractional contributions of these sub-populations down to radio flux levels of ~11uJy at 3GHz (or ~20uJy at 1.4GHz assuming a spectral index of -0.7). We find that the dominant fraction at 1.4GHz flux densities above ~200uJy is constituted of low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN. Below densities of ~100uJy the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases to ~60%, followed by the moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN (~20%), and low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN (~20%). Based on this observational evidence, we extrapolate the fractions down to sensitivities of the SKA. Our estimates suggest that at the faint flux limits to be reached by the SKA1 surveys, a selection based only on radio flux limits can provide a simple tool to efficiently identify samples highly (>75%) dominated by star-forming galaxies.
  • We explore the multiwavelength properties of AGN host galaxies for different classes of radio-selected AGN out to z$\lesssim$6 via a multiwavelength analysis of about 7700 radio sources in the COSMOS field. The sources were selected with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz (10 cm) within the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project, and cross-matched with multiwavelength ancillary data. This is the largest sample of high-redshift (z$\lesssim$6) radio sources with exquisite photometric coverage and redshift measurements available. We constructed a sample of moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN (HLAGN) via spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition combined with standard X-ray and mid-infrared diagnostics. Within the remainder of the sample we further identified low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN (MLAGN) via excess in radio emission relative to the star formation rates in their host galaxies. We show that AGN power in HLAGN occurs predominantly in radiative form, while MLAGN display a substantial mechanical AGN luminosity component. We found significant differences in the host properties of the two AGN classes, as a function of redshift. At z$<$1.5, MLAGN appear to reside in significantly more massive and less star-forming galaxies compared to HLAGN. At z$>$1.5, we observed a reversal in the behaviour of the stellar mass distributions with the HLAGN populating the higher stellar mass tail. We interpret this finding as a possible hint of the downsizing of galaxies hosting HLAGN, with the most massive galaxies triggering AGN activity earlier than less massive galaxies, and then fading to MLAGN at lower redshifts. Our conclusion is that HLAGN and MLAGN samples trace two distinct galaxy and AGN populations in a wide range of redshifts, possibly resembling the radio AGN types often referred to as radiative- and jet-mode (or high- and low-excitation), respectively.
  • We make use of the deep Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) COSMOS radio observations at 3 GHz to infer radio luminosity functions of star-forming galaxies up to redshifts of z~5 based on approximately 6000 detections with reliable optical counterparts. This is currently the largest radio-selected sample available out to z~5 across an area of 2 square degrees with a sensitivity of rms=2.3 ujy/beam. By fixing the faint and bright end shape of the radio luminosity function to the local values, we find a strong redshift trend that can be fitted with a pure luminosity evolution L~(1+z)^{(3.16 +- 0.2)-(0.32 +- 0.07) z}. We estimate star formation rates (SFRs) from our radio luminosities using an infrared (IR)-radio correlation that is redshift dependent. By integrating the parametric fits of the evolved luminosity function we calculate the cosmic SFR density (SFRD) history since z~5. Our data suggest that the SFRD history peaks between 2<z<3 and that the ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; 100 Msol/yr<SFR<1000 Msol/yr) contribute up to ~25% to the total SFRD in the same redshift range. Hyperluminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs; SFR>1000 Msol/yr) contribute an additional <2% in the entire observed redshift range. We find evidence of a potential underestimation of SFRD based on ultraviolet (UV) rest-frame observations of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at high redshifts (z>4) on the order of 15-20%, owing to appreciable star formation in highly dust-obscured galaxies, which might remain undetected in such UV observations.
  • We present the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project based on 384 hours of observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz (10 cm) toward the two square degree Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The final mosaic reaches a median rms of 2.3 uJy/beam over the two square degrees at an angular resolution of 0.75". To fully account for the spectral shape and resolution variations across the broad (2 GHz) band, we image all data with a multiscale, multifrequency synthesis algorithm. We present a catalog of 10,830 radio sources down to 5 sigma, out of which 67 are combined from multiple components. Comparing the positions of our 3 GHz sources with those from the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA)-COSMOS survey, we estimate that the astrometry is accurate to 0.01" at the bright end (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N_3GHz > 20). Survival analysis on our data combined with the VLA-COSMOS 1.4~GHz Joint Project catalog yields an expected median radio spectral index of alpha=-0.7. We compute completeness corrections via Monte Carlo simulations to derive the corrected 3 GHz source counts. Our counts are in agreement with previously derived 3 GHz counts based on single-pointing (0.087 square degrees) VLA data. In summary, the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project simultaneously provides the largest and deepest radio continuum survey at high (0.75") angular resolution to date, bridging the gap between last-generation and next-generation surveys.
  • We present observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz toward a sub-field of the XXL-North 25 deg$^{2}$ field targeting the first supercluster discovered in the XXL Survey. The structure has been found at a spectroscopic redshift of 0.43 and extending over $0.35\times0.1$ deg$^{2}$ on the sky. We present the 3 GHz VLA radio continuum observations, the radio mosaic and radio source catalogue, and, perform an analysis of the supercluster in the optical and radio regimes using photometric redshifts from the CFHTLS survey and our new VLA data. Our 3 GHz radio mosaic has a resolution of $3.2\times1.9$ arcsec$^2$, and covers an area of $41\times41$ arcmin$^2$ with rms noise level below $\sim20 \mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ ($\sim11\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ in central $15\times15$ arcmin$^2$). We extract a catalogue of 155 radio sources $\geq6\sigma$, 8 of which are multicomponent sources, and 123 ($79\%$) can be associated with optical sources in the CFHTLS W1 catalogue. Applying Voronoi tessellation analysis (VTA) in the area around the X-ray identified supercluster we identify a total of 17 overdensities at $z=0.35-0.50$, 7 of which are associated with clusters detected in the $XMM-Newton$ XXL data. We find a mean photometric redshift of 0.43 for our overdensities, consistent with the spectroscopic redshifts of 7 X-ray detected clusters. The full VTA-identified structure extends over $\sim0.6\times0.2$ deg$^2$ on the sky, ($\sim12\times4$ Mpc$^{2}$ at $z=0.43$). We associate 8 radio sources with potential group/cluster member galaxies none of which are large radio galaxies. The spatial distribution of the red and blue potential group member galaxies suggests that the clusters are dynamically young and not virialised yet, as expected for hierarchical structure growth in a $\Lambda$CDM universe. Further spectroscopic data are required to analyze the dynamical state of the groups.
  • We study the composition of the faint radio population selected from the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project, a radio continuum survey performed at 10 cm wavelength. The survey covers the full 2 square degree COSMOS field with mean $rms\sim2.3$ $\mu$Jy/beam, cataloging 10,899 source components above $5\times rms$. By combining these radio data with UltraVISTA, optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data, as well as X-ray data from the Chandra Legacy, and Chandra COSMOS surveys, we gain insight into the emission mechanisms within our radio sources out to redshifts of $z\sim5$. From these emission characteristics we classify our souces as star forming galaxies or AGN. Using their multi-wavelength properties we further separate the AGN into sub-samples dominated by radiatively efficient and inefficient AGN, often referred to as high- and low-excitation emission line AGN. We compare our method with other results based on fitting of the sources' spectral energy distributions using both galaxy and AGN spectral models, and those based on the infrared-radio correlation. We study the fractional contributions of these sub-populations down to radio flux levels of $\sim$10 $\mu$Jy. We find that at 3 GHz flux densities above $\sim$400 $\mu$Jy quiescent, red galaxies, consistent with the low-excitation radio AGN class constitute the dominant fraction. Below densities of $\sim$200 $\mu$Jy star-forming galaxies begin to constitute the largest fraction, followed by the low-excitation, and X-ray- and IR-identified high-excitation radio AGN.
  • The XXL Survey is the largest homogeneous and contiguous survey carried out with XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields, it primarily investigates the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Given its depth and sky coverage, XXL is particularly suited to systematically unveiling the clustering of X-ray clusters and to identifying superstructures in a homogeneous X-ray sample down to the typical mass scale of a local massive cluster. A friends-of-friends algorithm in three-dimensional physical space was run to identify large-scale structures. In this paper we report the discovery of the highest redshift supercluster of galaxies found in the XXL Survey. We describe the X-ray properties of the clusters members of the structure and the optical follow-up. The newly discovered supercluster is composed of six clusters of galaxies at a median redshift z around 0.43 and distributed across approximately 30 by 15 arc minutes (10 by 5 Mpc on sky) on the sky. This structure is very compact with all the clusters residing in one XMM pointing; for this reason this is the first supercluster discovered with the XXL Survey. Spectroscopic follow-up with WHT (William Herschel Telescope) and NTT (New Technology Telescope) confirmed a median redshift of z = 0.43. An estimate of the X-ray mass and luminosity of this supercluster and of its total gas mass put XLSSC-e at the average mass range of superclusters; its appearance, with two members of equal size, is quite unusual with respect to other superclusters and provides a unique view of the formation process of a massive structure.