• Chapter 2 in High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation and 300 metre-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. The present document describes the technologies and components that will be used to realise the project and is intended to serve as the basis for the detailed engineering design of HL-LHC.
  • The TOTEM experiment has been designed to measure the total proton-proton cross section and to study the elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC energy. The measurement requires detecting protons at distances as small as 1 mm from the beam center: TOTEM uses Roman Pots, movable beam pipe insertions, hosting silicon detectors. In the first period of LHC operation no relevant problems were detected with Roman Pots retracted or inserted during special runs. However, when operating the LHC with high intensity beams, impedance induced heating has been observed during the Roman Pots insertion. In order to be compatible with the higher LHC beam current foreseen after the LS1, a new version of the Roman Pot has been proposed and optimized with respect to the beam coupling impedance. In this work we present the bench impedance measurements carried out on the new Roman Pot prototype. Single and double wire measurements, as well as probe measurements, were performed in order to detect possible harmful resonant modes. The laboratory setup has been as well simulated with the help of CST Particle Studio in order to benchmark the measurement results. Measurements and simulations are in close agreement confirming the equipment compatibility with the LHC requirements for safe operation.