• We analyze the optical counterpart to the ultra-compact high velocity cloud AGC 226067, utilizing imaging taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The color magnitude diagram of the main body of AGC 226067 reveals an exclusively young stellar population, with an age of $\sim$7--50 Myr, and is consistent with a metallicity of [Fe/H]$\sim$$-$0.3 as previous work has measured via HII region spectroscopy. Additionally, the color magnitude diagram is consistent with a distance of $D$$\approx$17 Mpc, suggesting an association with the Virgo cluster. A secondary stellar system located $\sim$1.6' ($\sim$8 kpc) away in projection has a similar stellar population. The lack of an old red giant branch ($\gtrsim$5 Gyr) is contrasted with a serendipitously discovered Virgo dwarf in the ACS field of view (Dw J122147+132853), and the total diffuse light from AGC~226067 is consistent with the luminosity function of the resolved $\sim$7--50 Myr stellar population. The main body of AGC~226067 has a $M_{V}$=$-$11.3$\pm$0.3, or $M_{stars}$=5.4$\pm$1.3$\times$10$^4$ $M_{\odot}$ given the stellar population. We searched 20 deg$^2$ of imaging data adjacent to AGC~226067 in the Virgo Cluster, and found two similar stellar systems dominated by a blue stellar population, far from any massive galaxy counterpart -- if this population has similar star formation properties as AGC~226067, it implies $\sim$0.1 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ in Virgo intracluster star formation. Given its unusual stellar population, AGC~226067 is likely a stripped remnant and is plausibly the result of compressed gas from the ram pressure stripped M86 subgroup ($\sim$350 kpc away in projection) as it falls into the Virgo Cluster.
  • The Eastern Banded Structure (EBS) and Hydra~I halo overdensity are very nearby (d $\sim$ 10 kpc) objects discovered in SDSS data. Previous studies of the region have shown that EBS and Hydra I are spatially coincident, cold structures at the same distance, suggesting that Hydra I may be the EBS's progenitor. We combine new wide-field DECam imaging and MMT/Hectochelle spectroscopic observations of Hydra I with SDSS archival spectroscopic observations to quantify Hydra I's present-day chemodynamical properties, and to infer whether it originated as a star cluster or dwarf galaxy. While previous work using shallow SDSS imaging assumed a standard old, metal-poor stellar population, our deeper DECam imaging reveals that Hydra~I has a thin, well-defined main sequence turnoff of intermediate age ($\sim 5-6$ Gyr) and metallicity ([Fe/H] = $-0.9$ dex). We measure statistically significant spreads in both the iron and alpha-element abundances of $\sigma_{[Fe/H]} = 0.13 \pm 0.02$ dex and $\sigma_{[\alpha/{\rm Fe}]} = 0.09 \pm 0.03$ dex, respectively, and place upper limits on both the rotation and its proper motion. Hydra~I's intermediate age and [Fe/H] -- as well as its low [$\alpha$/Fe], apparent [Fe/H] spread, and present-day low luminosity -- suggest that its progenitor was a dwarf galaxy, which subsequently lost more than $99.99\%$ of its stellar mass.
  • Preliminary results of the ongoing search for symbiotic binary stars in the Local Group of Galaxies are presented and discussed.
  • The Ophiuchus stream is a recently discovered stellar tidal stream in the Milky Way. We present high-quality spectroscopic data for 14 stream member stars obtained using the Keck and MMT telescopes. We confirm the stream as a fast moving ($v_{los}\sim290$ km s$^{-1}$), kinematically cold group ($\sigma_{v_{los}}\lesssim1$ km s$^{-1}$) of $\alpha$-enhanced and metal-poor stars (${\rm [\alpha/Fe]\sim0.4}$ dex, ${\rm [Fe/H]\sim-2.0}$ dex). Using a probabilistic technique, we model the stream simultaneously in line-of-sight velocity, color-magnitude, coordinate, and proper motion space, and so determine its distribution in 6D phase-space. We find that that the stream extends in distance from 7.5 to 9 kpc from the Sun; it is 50 times longer than wide, merely appearing highly foreshortened in projection. The analysis of the stellar population contained in the stream suggests that it is $\sim12$ Gyr old, and that its initial stellar mass was $\sim2\times10^4$ $M_{\odot}$ (or at least $\gtrsim7\times10^3$ $M_{\odot}$). Assuming a fiducial Milky Way potential, we fit an orbit to the stream which matches the observed phase-space distribution, except for some tension in the proper motions: the stream has an orbital period of $\sim350$ Myr, and is on a fairly eccentric orbit ($e\sim0.66$) with a pericenter of $\sim3.5$ kpc and an apocenter of $\sim17$ kpc. The phase-space structure and stellar population of the stream show that its progenitor must have been a globular cluster that was disrupted only $\sim240$ Myr ago. We do not detect any significant overdensity of stars along the stream that would indicate the presence of a progenitor, and conclude that the stream is all that is left of the progenitor.
  • We report five Local Volume dwarf galaxies (two of which are presented here for the first time) uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an H$\alpha$-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association, the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction ($M_{HI}/M_{star}$) of the five dwarfs are generally consistent with that of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Volume, although ALFALFA-Dw1 (associated with ALFALFA UCHVC HVC274.68+74.70$-$123) has a very high $M_{HI}/M_{star}$$\sim$40. Despite the heterogenous nature of our search, we demonstrate that the current dwarf companions to UCHVCs are at the edge of detectability due to their low surface brightness, and that deeper searches are likely to find more stellar systems. If more sensitive searches do not reveal further stellar counterparts to UCHVCs, then the dearth of such systems around the Local Group may be in conflict with $\Lambda$CDM simulations.
  • We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, which we dub Scl-MM-Dw1, at a projected distance of $\sim$65 kpc from the spiral galaxy NGC 253. The discovery results from the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), a program with the Magellan/Megacam imager to study faint substructure in resolved stellar light around massive galaxies outside of the Local Group. We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to Scl-MM-Dw1 of $D$=3.9$\pm$0.5 Mpc, consistent with that of NGC 253, making their association likely. The new dwarf's stellar population is complex, with an old, metal poor red giant branch ($\gtrsim$10 Gyr, [Fe/H]$\sim$$-$2), and an asymptotic giant branch with an age of $\sim$500 Myr. Scl-MM-Dw1 has a half-light radius of $r_{h}$=340$\pm$50 pc and an absolute magnitude of $M_{V}$=$-$10.3$\pm$0.6 mag, comparable to the Milky Way's satellites at the same luminosity. Once complete, our imaging survey of NGC 253 and other nearby massive galaxies will provide a census of faint substructure in halos beyond the Local Group, both to put our own environment into context and to confront models of hierarchical structure formation.
  • We present deep wide-field photometry of three recently discovered faint Milky Way satellites: Leo V, Pisces II, and Canes Venatici II. Our main goals are to study the structure and star formation history of these dwarfs; we also search for signs of tidal disturbance. The three satellites have similar half-light radii ($\sim 60-90$ pc) but a wide range of ellipticities. Both Leo V and CVn II show hints of stream-like overdensities at large radii. An analysis of the satellite color-magnitude diagrams shows that all three objects are old ($>$ 10 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] $\sim -2$), though neither the models nor the data have sufficient precision to assess when the satellites formed with respect to cosmic reionization. The lack of an observed younger stellar population ($\la 10$ Gyr) possibly sets them apart from the other satellites at Galactocentric distances $\ga 150$ kpc. We present a new compilation of structural data for all Milky Way satellite galaxies and use it to compare the properties of classical dwarfs to the ultra-faints. The ellipticity distribution of the two groups is consistent at the $\sim$2-$\sigma$ level. However, the faintest satellites tend to be more aligned toward the Galactic center, and those satellites with the highest ellipticity ($\ga 0.4$) have orientations ($\Delta \theta_{GC}$) in the range $20^{\circ} \lesssim \Delta \theta_{GC} \lesssim 40^{\circ}$. This latter observation is in rough agreement with predictions from simulations of dwarf galaxies that have lost a significant fraction of their dark matter halos and are being tidally stripped.
  • The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an on-going HST Multicycle Treasury program to image ~1/3 of M31's star forming disk in 6 filters, from the UV to the NIR. The full survey will resolve the galaxy into more than 100 million stars with projected radii from 0-20 kpc over a contiguous 0.5 square degree area in 828 orbits, producing imaging in the F275W and F336W filters with WFC3/UVIS, F475W and F814W with ACS/WFC, and F110W and F160W with WFC3/IR. The resulting wavelength coverage gives excellent constraints on stellar temperature, bolometric luminosity, and extinction for most spectral types. The photometry reaches SNR=4 at F275W=25.1, F336W=24.9, F475W=27.9, F814W=27.1, F110W=25.5, and F160W=24.6 for single pointings in the uncrowded outer disk; however, the optical and NIR data are crowding limited, and the deepest reliable magnitudes are up to 5 magnitudes brighter in the inner bulge. All pointings are dithered and produce Nyquist-sampled images in F475W, F814W, and F160W. We describe the observing strategy, photometry, astrometry, and data products, along with extensive tests of photometric stability, crowding errors, spatially-dependent photometric biases, and telescope pointing control. We report on initial fits to the structure of M31's disk, derived from the density of RGB stars, in a way that is independent of the assumed M/L and is robust to variations in dust extinction. These fits also show that the 10 kpc ring is not just a region of enhanced recent star formation, but is instead a dynamical structure containing a significant overdensity of stars with ages >1 Gyr. (Abridged)
  • The AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) is a redshift survey covering, in its standard fields, 7.7 square degrees of the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). The final sample consists of 23745 redshifts. There are well-defined galaxy samples in ten bands (the Bw, R, I, J, K, IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 micron and MIPS 24 micron bands) to a limiting magnitude of I<20 mag for spectroscopy. For these galaxies, we obtained 18163 redshifts from a sample of 35200 galaxies, where random sparse sampling was used to define statistically complete sub-samples in all ten photometric bands. The median galaxy redshift is 0.31, and 90% of the redshifts are in the range 0.085<z<0.66. AGN were selected as radio, X-ray, IRAC mid-IR and MIPS 24 micron sources to fainter limiting magnitudes (I<22.5 mag for point sources). Redshifts were obtained for 4764 quasars and galaxies with AGN signatures, with 2926, 1718, 605, 119 and 13 above redshifts of 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. We detail all the AGES selection procedures and present the complete spectroscopic redshift catalogs, spectra, and spectral energy distribution decompositions. The photometric redshift estimates are for all sources in the AGES samples.
  • We analyze our accurate kinematical data for the old clusters in the inner regions of M31. These velocities are based on high S/N Hectospec data (Caldwell et al 2010). The data are well suited for analysis of M31's inner regions because we took particular care to correct for contamination by unresolved field stars from the disk and bulge in the fibers. The metal poor clusters show kinematics which are compatible with a pressure-supported spheroid. The kinematics of metal-rich clusters, however, argue for a disk population. In particular the innermost region (inside 2 kpc) shows the kinematics of the x2 family of bar periodic orbits, arguing for the existence of an inner Lindblad resonance in M31.
  • We report on a single star, B030D, observed as part of a large survey of objects in M31, which has the unusual radial velocity of -780 km/s. Based on details of its spectrum, we find that the star is an F supergiant, with a circumstellar shell. The evolutionary status of the star could be one of a post-mainsequence close binary, a symbiotic nova, or less likely, a post-AGB star, which additional observations could help sort out. Membership of the star in the Andromeda Giant Stream can explain its highly negative velocity.
  • We have obtained optical spectra of 29 early-type (E/S0) galaxies that hosted type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We have measured absorption-line strengths and compared them to a grid of models to extract the relations between the supernova properties and the luminosity-weighted age/composition of the host galaxies. The same analysis was applied to a large number of early-type field galaxies selected from the SDSS spectroscopic survey. We find no difference in the age and abundance distributions between the field galaxies and the SN Ia host galaxies. We do find a strong correlation suggesting that SNe Ia in galaxies whose populations have a characteristic age greater than 5 Gyr are ~ 1 mag fainter at V(max) than those found in galaxies with younger populations. However, the data cannot discriminate between a smooth relation connecting age and supernova luminosity or two populations of SN Ia progenitors. We find that SN Ia distance residuals in the Hubble diagram are correlated with host-galaxy metal abundance, consistent with the predictions of Timmes, Brown & Truran (2003). The data show that high iron abundance galaxies host less-luminous supernovae. We thus conclude that the time since progenitor formation primarily determines the radioactive Ni production while progenitor metal abundance has a weaker influence on peak luminosity, but one not fully corrected by light-curve shape and color fitters. Assuming no selection effects in discovering SNe Ia in local early-type galaxies, we find a higher specific SN Ia rate in E/S0 galaxies with ages below 3 Gyr than in older hosts. The higher rate and brighter luminosities seen in the youngest E/S0 hosts may be a result of recent star formation and represents a tail of the "prompt" SN Ia progenitors.
  • We present 432 low-dispersion optical spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that also have well-calibrated light curves. The coverage ranges from 6 epochs to 36 epochs of spectroscopy. Most of the data were obtained with the 1.5m Tillinghast telescope at the F. L. Whipple Observatory with typical wavelength coverage of 3700-7400A and a resolution of ~7A. The earliest spectra are thirteen days before B-band maximum; two-thirds of the SNe were observed before maximum brightness. Coverage for some SNe continues almost to the nebular phase. The consistency of the method of observation and the technique of reduction makes this an ideal data set for studying the spectroscopic diversity of SNe Ia.
  • We built an optimal basis of low resolution templates for galaxies over the wavelength range from 0.2 to 10 $\mu$m using a variant of the algorithm presented by Budavari et al. (2000). We derived them using eleven bands of photometry from the NDWFS, FLAMEX, zBo\"otes and IRAC Shallow surveys for 16033 galaxies in the NDWFS Bo\"otes field with spectroscopic redshifts measured by the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We also developed algorithms to accurately determine photometric redshifts, K corrections and bolometric luminosities using these templates. Our photometric redshifts have an accuracy of $\sigma_z/(1+z) = 0.04$ when clipped to the best 95%. We used these templates to study the spectral type distribution in the field and to estimate luminosity functions of galaxies as a function of redshift and spectral type. In particular, we note that the 5-8$\mu$m color distribution of galaxies is bimodal, much like the optical g--r colors.
  • We present a cautionary study exploring the reliability of the H-delta line in the integrated spectra of galaxies for determining galaxy ages. Our database consists of the observed integrated spectra of ~120 early-type galaxies, of 7 metal-rich globular clusters in M31 and the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tuc, and of the open cluster M67. We have measured H-delta using index definitions designed to assess contamination from the CN molecule in and around H-delta by choosing combinations of bandpasses that both avoid and include a region of CN molecular lines redward of H-delta. We find systematic differences in the ages derived from H-delta measurements among the various definitions when extracting ages from H-delta in old stellar populations with enhanced CN bands due to non-solar abundance ratios. We propose that neighboring CN lines have a strong effect on pseudocontinuum and central bandpass levels. For stellar populations which have non-solar abundance ratios in C and/or N, population synthesis models that do not account for abundance ratio variations cannot reproduce accurately the CN 4216 \AA band, which leads to a corresponding inaccuracy in reproducing the various H-delta indices. Hence, caution must be used when extracting galaxy ages from the H-delta line in old stellar populations with significant non-solar abundance ratios.
  • We present extensive optical and infrared photometry of the afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 030329 and its associated supernova (SN) 2003dh over the first two months after detection (2003 March 30-May 29 UT). Optical spectroscopy from a variety of telescopes is shown and, when combined with the photometry, allows an unambiguous separation between the afterglow and supernova contributions. The optical afterglow of the GRB is initially a power-law continuum but shows significant color variations during the first week that are unrelated to the presence of a supernova. The early afterglow light curve also shows deviations from the typical power-law decay. A supernova spectrum is first detectable ~7 days after the burst and dominates the light after ~11 days. The spectral evolution and the light curve are shown to closely resemble those of SN 1998bw, a peculiar Type Ic SN associated with GRB 980425, and the time of the supernova explosion is close to the observed time of the GRB. It is now clear that at least some GRBs arise from core-collapse SNe.
  • We present early observations of the afterglow of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 030329 and the spectroscopic discovery of its associated supernova SN 2003dh. We obtained spectra of the afterglow of GRB 030329 each night from March 30.12 (0.6 days after the burst) to April 8.13 (UT) (9.6 days after the burst). The spectra cover a wavelength range of 350 nm to 850 nm. The early spectra consist of a power-law continuum (F_nu ~ nu^{-0.9}) with narrow emission lines originating from HII regions in the host galaxy, indicating a low redshift of z=0.1687. However, our spectra taken after 2003 Apr. 5 show broad peaks in flux characteristic of a supernova. Correcting for the afterglow emission, we find the spectrum of the supernova is remarkably similar to the type Ic `hypernova' SN 1998bw. While the presence of supernovae have been inferred from the light curves and colors of GRB afterglows in the past, this is the first direct, spectroscopic confirmation that a subset of classical gamma-ray bursts originate from supernovae.
  • Multi-fiber spectroscopy has been obtained for 335 galaxies in the field of the double cluster A3128/A3125, using the 2dF multi-fiber positioner on the AAT. A total of 532 objects in the double cluster now have known redshifts. We have also obtained a 20 ks Chandra ACIS-I image of A3128 and radio imaging with the MOST and the ATCA. The spatial-kinematic distribution of redshifts in the field of A3128/A3125, when combined with the Chandra image of A3128, reveals a variety of substructures present in the galaxy distribution and in the hot ICM. The most striking large-scale feature in the galaxy distribution is an underpopulated redshift zone ~4000 km/s on either side of the cluster velocity at ~17500 km/s. We attribute this depletion zone to the effect of the extensive Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster (HRS), within which A3128/A3125 is embedded. In addition, numerous smaller groups of galaxies are identified, particularly in the underpopulated region within +-4000 km/s of the cluster redshift. Due to the large gravitational influence of the HRS, these groups arrive at A3128 with a very high (hypersonic) infall velocity. Two of these groups appear as elongated filaments in position-velocity diagrams, indicating that they are tidally distended groups which have been disrupted after a close passage through A3128. We have identified a primary NE-SW merger axis connecting A3128 with A3125, along which the filaments are also oriented. In addition, the Chandra image reveals that the X-ray emission is split into two components, each with very small core radii, that are separated by ~1 Mpc along the NE-SW axis. We propose that the complex X-ray morphology is likely the result of the hypersonic infall of a relatively small group into A3128. The group produces a major disruption in the ICM due to its high infall velocity.
  • We present a new photometric catalogue of the Coma galaxy cluster in the Johnson U- and V- bands. We cover an area of 3360arcmin2 of sky, to a depth of V=20 mag in a 13 arcsec diameter aperture, and produce magnitudes for ~1400 extended objects in metric apertures from 8.8 to 26arcsec diameters. The mean internal RMS scatter in the photometry is 0.014 mag in V, and 0.026 mag in U, for V13 < 17 mag. We place new limits on the levels of scatter in the colour--magnitude relation (CMR) in the Coma cluster, and investigate how the slope and scatter of the CMR depends on galaxy morphology, luminosity and position within the cluster. As expected, the lowest levels of scatter are found in the elliptical galaxies, while the late type galaxies have the highest numbers of galaxies bluewards of the CMR. We investigate whether the slope of the CMR is an artifact of colour gradients within galaxies and, show that it persists when the colours are measured within a diameter that scales with galaxy size. Looking at the environmental dependence of the CMR, we find a trend of systematically bluer galaxy colours with increasing projected cluster-centric radius which we associate with a gradient in the mean galactic ages.
  • Observations of the quiescent X-ray nova XTE J1118+480 with the new 6.5-m MMT have revealed that the velocity amplitude of the dwarf secondary is 698 +/- 14 km/s and the orbital period of the system is 0.17013 +/- 0.00010 d. The implied value of the mass function, f(M) = 6.00 +/- 0.36 solar masses, provides a hard lower limit on the mass of the compact primary that greatly exceeds the maximum allowed mass of a neutron star. Thus we conclude that the compact primary is a black hole. Among the eleven dynamically established black-hole X-ray novae, the large mass function of XTE J1118+480 is rivaled only by that of V404 Cyg. We estimate that the secondary supplies 34% +/- 8% of the total light at 5900A and that its spectral type is in the range K5V to M1V. A double-humped I-band light curve is probably due to ellipsoidal modulation, although this interpretation is not entirely secure because of an unusual 12-minute offset between the spectroscopic and photometric ephemerides. Assuming that the light curve is ellipsoidal, we present a provisional analysis which indicates that the inclination of the system is high and the mass of the black hole is correspondingly modest. The broad Balmer emission lines (FWHM = 2300-2900 km/s) also suggest a high inclination. For the range of spectral types given above, we estimate a distance of 1.8 +/- 0.6 kpc.
  • We use the $C_{2}4668$, $Fe4383$, $H\gamma_A$ and $H\delta_A$ spectral absorption line indices, together with U- and V-band photometry of 101 galaxies in the Coma cluster, to investigate how mean age and metal abundance correlate with galaxy luminosity. In particular, we use the line index measurements to address the origin of the colour-magnitude relation (CMR). We find that the CMR in Coma is driven primarily by a luminosity-metallicity correlation. We additionally show evidence for a relation between age and luminosity, in the direction predicted by the semi-analytic hierarchical clustering models of Kauffmann & Charlot, but this is only present in the $C_24668$ index models, and could be an effect of the lack of non solar abundance ratios in the Worthey models used. By comparing deviations from the CMR, with deviations in absorption index from analogous `index-magnitude' relations, we find that colour deviations bluewards of the mean relation are strongly correlated with the hydrogen Balmer line series absorption. We show that the properties of these blue galaxies are consistent with the presence of a young stellar population in the galaxies, rather than with a reduced metallicity.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the type Ia SN 1998bu in the Leo I Group galaxy M96 (NGC 3368). The data set consists of 356 photometric measurements and 29 spectra of SN 1998bu between UT 1998 May 11 and July 15. The well-sampled light curve indicates the supernova reached maximum light in B on UT 1998 May 19.3 (JD 2450952.8 +/- 0.8) with B = 12.22 +/- 0.03 and V = 11.88 +/- 0.02. Application of a revised version of the Multicolor Light Curve Shape (MLCS) method yields an extinction toward the supernova of A_V = 0.94 +/- 0.15 mag, and indicates the supernova was of average luminosity compared to other normal type Ia supernovae. Using the HST Cepheid distance modulus to M96 (Tanvir et al. 1995) and the MLCS fit parameters for the supernova, we derive an extinction-corrected absolute magnitude for SN 1998bu at maximum, M_V = -19.42 +/- 0.22. Our independent results for this supernova are consistent with those of Suntzeff et al. (1999). Combining SN 1998bu with three other well-observed local calibrators and 42 supernovae in the Hubble flow yields a Hubble constant, H_0 = 64^{+8}_{-6} km/s/Mpc, where the error estimate incorporates possible sources of systematic uncertainty including the calibration of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation, the metallicity dependence of the Cepheid distance scale, and the distance to the LMC.
  • We have used ISO to observe at 12$\mu$m seven E+A galaxies plus an additional emission line galaxy, all in the Coma cluster. E+A galaxies lacking narrow emission lines have 2.2$\mu$m to 12$\mu$m flux density ratios or limits similar to old stellar populations (typical of early-type galaxies). Only galaxies with emission lines have enhanced 12$\mu$m flux density. Excess 12$\mu$m emission is therefore correlated with the presence of on-going star formation or an active galactic nucleus (AGN). By comparing the current star formation rates with previous rates estimated from the Balmer absorption features, we divide the galaxies into two groups: those for which star formation has declined significantly following a dramatic peak $\sim$ 1 Gyr ago; and those with a significant level of ongoing star formation or/and an AGN. There is no strong difference in the spatial distribution on the sky between these two groups. However, the first group has systemic velocities above the mean cluster value and the second group below that value. This suggests that the two groups differ kinematically. Based on surveys of the Coma cluster in the radio, the IRAS sources, and galaxies detected in H$\alpha$ emission, we sum the far infrared luminosity function of galaxies in the cluster. We find that star formation in late type galaxies is probably the dominant component of the Coma cluster far infrared luminosity. The presence of significant emission from intracluster dust is not yet firmly established. The member galaxies also account for most of the far infrared output from nearby rich clusters in general.