• Propagation character of spin wave was investigated for chiral magnets FeGe and Co-Zn-Mn alloys, which can host magnetic skyrmions near room temperature. On the basis of the frequency shift between counter-propagating spin waves, the magnitude and sign of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction were directly evaluated. The obtained magnetic parameters quantitatively account for the size and helicity of skyrmions as well as their materials variation, proving that the DM interaction plays a decisive role in the skyrmion formation in this class of room-temperature chiral magnets. The propagating spin-wave spectroscopy can thus be an efficient tool to study DM interaction in bulk single-phase compounds. Our results also demonstrate a function of spin-wave diode based on chiral crystal structures at room temperature.
  • A magnetic helix arises in chiral magnets with a wavelength set by the spin-orbit coupling. We show that the helimagnetic order is a nanoscale analog to liquid crystals, exhibiting topological structures and domain walls that are distinctly different from classical magnets. Using magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we demonstrate that - similar to cholesteric liquid crystals - three fundamental types of domain walls are realized in the helimagnet FeGe. We reveal the micromagnetic wall structure and show that they can carry a finite skyrmion charge, permitting coupling to spin currents and contributions to a topological Hall effect. Our study establishes a new class of magnetic nano-objects with non-trivial topology, opening the door to innovative device concepts based on helimagnetic domain walls.
  • Chirality of matter can produce unique responses in optics, electricity and magnetism. In particular, magnetic crystals transmit their handedness to the magnetism via antisymmetric exchange interaction of relativistic origin, producing helical spin orders as well as their fluctuations. Here we report for a chiral magnet MnSi that chiral spin fluctuations manifest themselves in the electrical magnetochiral effect (eMChE), i.e. the nonreciprocal and nonlinear response characterized by the electrical conductance depending on inner product of electric and magnetic fields $\boldsymbol{E} \cdot \boldsymbol{B}$. Prominent eMChE signals emerge at specific temperature-magnetic field-pressure regions: in the paramagnetic phase just above the helical ordering temperature and in the partially-ordered topological spin state at low temperatures and high pressures, where thermal and quantum spin fluctuations are conspicuous in proximity of classical and quantum phase transitions, respectively. The finding of the asymmetric electron scattering by chiral spin fluctuations may explore new electromagnetic functionality in chiral magnets.
  • Chiral magnetic interactions induce complex spin textures including helical and conical spin waves, as well as particle-like objects such as magnetic skyrmions and merons. These spin textures are the basis for innovative device paradigms and give rise to exotic topological phenomena, thus being of interest for both applied and fundamental sciences. Present key questions address the dynamics of the spin system and emergent topological defects. Here we analyze the micromagnetic dynamics in the helimagnetic phase of FeGe. By combining magnetic force microscopy, single-spin magnetometry, and Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert simulations we show that the nanoscale dynamics are governed by the depinning and subsequent motion of magnetic edge dislocations. The motion of these topologically stable objects triggers perturbations that can propagate over mesoscopic length scales. The observation of stochastic instabilities in the micromagnetic structure provides new insight to the spatio-temporal dynamics of itinerant helimagnets and topological defects, and discloses novel challenges regarding their technological usage.
  • The internal and lattice structures of magnetic skyrmions in B20-type FeGe are investigated using off-axis electron holography. The temperature, magnetic field and angular dependence of the magnetic moments of individual skyrmions are analyzed. Whereas the internal skyrmion shape is found to vary with magnetic field, the inter-skyrmion distance remains almost unchanged in the lattice phase. The amplitude of the local magnetic moment is found to depend on temperature, while the skyrmion shape does not. Deviations from a circular to a hexagonal skyrmion structure are observed in the lattice phase.
  • Topologically stable matters can have a long lifetime, even if thermodynamically costly, when the thermal agitation is sufficiently low. A magnetic skyrmion lattice (SkL) represents a unique form of long-range magnetic order that is topologically stable, and therefore, a long-lived, metastable SkL can form. Experimental observations of the SkL in bulk crystals, however, have mostly been limited to a finite and narrow temperature region in which the SkL is thermodynamically stable; thus, the benefits of the topological stability remain unclear. Here, we report a metastable SkL created by quenching a thermodynamically stable SkL. Hall-resistivity measurements of MnSi reveal that, although the metastable SkL is short-lived at high temperatures, the lifetime becomes prolonged (>> 1 week) at low temperatures. The manipulation of a delicate balance between thermal agitation and the topological stability enables a deterministic creation/annihilation of the metastable SkL by exploiting electric heating and subsequent rapid cooling, thus establishing a facile method to control the formation of a SkL.
  • We investigate skyrmion formation in both a single crystalline bulk and epitaxial thin films of MnSi by measurements of planar Hall effect. A prominent stepwise field profile of planar Hall effect is observed in the well-established skyrmion phase region in the bulk sample, which is assigned to anisotropic magnetoresistance effect with respect to the magnetic modulation direction. We also detect the characteristic planar Hall anomalies in the thin films under the in-plane magnetic field at low temperatures, which indicates the formation of skyrmion strings lying in the film plane. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy plays an important role in stabilizing the in-plane skyrmions in the MnSi thin film.
  • Spontaneously emergent chirality is an issue of fundamental importance across the natural sciences. It has been argued that a unidirectional (chiral) rotation of a mechanical ratchet is forbidden in thermal equilibrium, but becomes possible in systems out of equilibrium. Here we report our finding that a topologically nontrivial spin texture known as a skyrmion - a particle-like object in which spins point in all directions to wrap a sphere - constitutes such a ratchet. By means of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy we show that micron-sized crystals of skyrmions in thin films of Cu2OSeO3 and MnSi display a unidirectional rotation motion. Our numerical simulations based on a stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation suggest that this rotation is driven solely by thermal fluctuations in the presence of a temperature gradient, whereas in thermal equilibrium it is forbidden by the Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem. We show that the rotational flow of magnons driven by the effective magnetic field of skyrmions gives rise to the skyrmion rotation, therefore suggesting that magnons can be used to control the motion of these spin textures.
  • We investigate the skyrmion formation process in nano-structured FeGe Hall-bar devices by measurements of topological Hall effect, which extracts the winding number of a spin texture as an emergent magnetic field. Step-wise profiles of topological Hall resistivity are observed in the course of varying the applied magnetic field, which arise from instantaneous changes in the magnetic nano-structure such as creation, annihilation, and jittering motion of skyrmions. The discrete changes in topological Hall resistivity demonstrate the quantized nature of emergent magnetic flux inherent in each skyrmion, which had been indistinguishable in many-skyrmion systems on a macroscopic scale.
  • The chirality, i.e. left or right handedness, is an important notion in a broad range of science. In condensed matter, this occurs not only in molecular or crystal forms but also in magnetic structures. A magnetic skyrmion, a topologically-stable spin vortex structure, as observed in chiral-lattice helimagnets is one such example; the spin swirling direction (skyrmion helicity) should be closely related to the underlying lattice chirality via the relativistic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Here, we report on the correlation between skyrmion helicity and crystal chirality as observed by Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) on the composition-spread alloys of helimagnets Mn1-xFexGe over a broad range (x = 0.3 - 1.0) of the composition. The skyrmion lattice constant or the skyrmion size shows non-monotonous variation with the composition x, accompanying a divergent behavior around x = 0.8, where the correlation between magnetic helicity and crystal chirality is reversed. The underlying mechanism is a continuous x-variation of the SOC strength accompanying sign reversal in the metallic alloys. This may offer a promising way to tune the skyrmion size and helicity.
  • Magneto-transport properties have been investigated for epitaxial thin films of B20-type MnSi grown on Si(111) substrates. Both Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and topological Hall effect (THE) clearly point to the robust formation of skyrmions over a wide temperature-magnetic field region. New features distinct from those of bulk MnSi are observed for epitaxial MnSi films: a shorter (nearly half) period of the spin helix and skyrmions, and an opposite sign of THE. These observations suggest versatile features of skyrmion-induced THE beyond the current understanding.