• We have created a new autonomous laser-guide-star adaptive-optics (AO) instrument on the 60-inch (1.5-m) telescope at Palomar Observatory called Robo-AO. The instrument enables diffraction-limited resolution observing in the visible and near-infrared with the ability to observe well over one-hundred targets per night due to its fully robotic operation. Robo- AO is being used for AO surveys of targets numbering in the thousands, rapid AO imaging of transient events and longterm AO monitoring not feasible on large diameter telescope systems. We have taken advantage of cost-effective advances in deformable mirror and laser technology while engineering Robo-AO with the intention of cloning the system for other few-meter class telescopes around the world.
  • We construct a photometrically calibrated catalog of non-variable sources from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) observations. The first version of this catalog presented here, the PTF photometric catalog 1.0, contains calibrated R_PTF-filter magnitudes for about 21 million sources brighter than magnitude 19, over an area of about 11233 deg^2. The magnitudes are provided in the PTF photometric system, and the color of a source is required in order to convert these magnitudes into other magnitude systems. We estimate that the magnitudes in this catalog have typical accuracy of about 0.02 mag with respect to magnitudes from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The median repeatability of our catalog's magnitudes for stars between 15 and 16 mag, is about 0.01 mag, and it is better than 0.03 mag for 95% of the sources in this magnitude range. The main goal of this catalog is to provide reference magnitudes for photometric calibration of visible light observations. Subsequent versions of this catalog, which will be published incrementally online, will be extended to a larger sky area and will also include g_PTF-filter magnitudes, as well as variability and proper motion information.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is a synoptic survey designed to explore the transient and variable sky in a wide variety of cadences. We use PTF observations of fields that were observed multiple times (>=10) per night, for several nights, to find asteroids, construct their lightcurves and measure their rotation periods. Here we describe the pipeline we use to achieve these goals and present the results from the first four (overlapping) PTF fields analyzed as part of this program. These fields, which cover an area of 21 deg^2, were observed on four nights with a cadence of ~20 min. Our pipeline was able to detect 624 asteroids, of which 145 (~20%) were previously unknown. We present high quality rotation periods for 88 main-belt asteroids and possible period or lower limit on the period for an additional 85 asteroids. For the remaining 451 asteroids, we present lower limits on their photometric amplitudes. Three of the asteroids have lightcurves that are characteristic of binary asteroids. We estimate that implementing our search for all existing high-cadence PTF data will provide rotation periods for about 10,000 asteroids mainly in the magnitude range ~14 to ~20.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) provides multiple epoch imaging for a large fraction of the sky. Here we describe the photometric calibration of the PTF data products that relates the PTF magnitudes to other mag systems. The calibration process utilizes SDSS r~16 mag point source objects as photometric standards. During photometric conditions, this allows us to solve for the extinction coefficients and color terms, and to estimate the camera illumination correction. This also enables the calibration of fields that are outside the SDSS footprint. We test the precision and repeatability of the PTF photometric calibration. Given that PTF is observing in a single filter each night, we define a PTF calibrated magnitude system for R-band and g-band. We show that, in this system, 59% (47%) of the photometrically calibrated PTF R-band (g-band) data achieve a photometric precision of 0.02-0.04 mag. Given the objects' color, the PTF magnitude system can be converted to other systems. A night-by-night comparison of the calibrated magnitudes of individual stars observed on multiple nights shows that they are consistent to a level of ~0.02 mag. Most of the data that were taken under non-photometric conditions can be calibrated relative to other epochs of the same sky footprint obtained during photometric conditions. We provide a guide describing the use of the PTF photometric calibration data products, as well as the transformations between the PTF magnitude system and the SDSS and Johnson-Cousins systems. (abridged).
  • The rate of image acquisition in modern synoptic imaging surveys has already begun to outpace the feasibility of keeping astronomers in the real-time discovery and classification loop. Here we present the inner workings of a framework, based on machine-learning algorithms, that captures expert training and ground-truth knowledge about the variable and transient sky to automate 1) the process of discovery on image differences and, 2) the generation of preliminary science-type classifications of discovered sources. Since follow-up resources for extracting novel science from fast-changing transients are precious, self-calibrating classification probabilities must be couched in terms of efficiencies for discovery and purity of the samples generated. We estimate the purity and efficiency in identifying real sources with a two-epoch image-difference discovery algorithm for the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey. Once given a source discovery, using machine-learned classification trained on PTF data, we distinguish between transients and variable stars with a 3.8% overall error rate (with 1.7% errors for imaging within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint). At >96% classification efficiency, the samples achieve 90% purity. Initial classifications are shown to rely primarily on context-based features, determined from the data itself and external archival databases. In the ~one year since autonomous operations, this discovery and classification framework has led to several significant science results, from outbursting young stars to subluminous Type IIP supernovae to candidate tidal disruption events. We discuss future directions of this approach, including the possible roles of crowdsourcing and the scalability of machine learning to future surveys such a the Large Synoptical Survey Telescope (LSST).
  • Supernovae (SNe) are stellar explosions driven by gravitational or thermonuclear energy, observed as electromagnetic radiation emitted over weeks or more. In all known SNe, this radiation comes from internal energy deposited in the outflowing ejecta by either radioactive decay of freshly-synthesized elements (typically 56Ni), stored heat deposited by the explosion shock in the envelope of a supergiant star, or interaction between the SN debris and slowly-moving, hydrogen-rich circumstellar material. Here we report on a new class of luminous SNe whose observed properties cannot be explained by any of these known processes. These include four new SNe we have discovered, and two previously unexplained events (SN 2005ap; SCP 06F6) that we can now identify as members. These SNe are all ~10 times brighter than SNe Ia, do not show any trace of hydrogen, emit significant ultra-violet (UV) flux for extended periods of time, and have late-time decay rates which are inconsistent with radioactivity. Our data require that the observed radiation is emitted by hydrogen-free material distributed over a large radius (~10^15 cm) and expanding at high velocities (>10^4 km s^-1). These long-lived, UV-luminous events can be observed out to redshifts z>4 and offer an excellent opportunity to study star formation in, and the interstellar medium of, primitive distant galaxies.
  • PTF09dav is a peculiar subluminous type Ia supernova (SN) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Spectroscopically, it appears superficially similar to the class of subluminous SN1991bg-like SNe, but it has several unusual features which make it stand out from this population. Its peak luminosity is fainter than any previously discovered SN1991bg-like SN Ia (M_B -15.5), but without the unusually red optical colors expected if the faint luminosity were due to extinction. The photospheric optical spectra have very unusual strong lines of Sc II and Mg I, with possible Sr II, together with stronger than average Ti II and low velocities of ~6000 km/s. The host galaxy of PTF09dav is ambiguous. The SN lies either on the extreme outskirts (~41kpc) of a spiral galaxy, or in an very faint (M_R>-12.8) dwarf galaxy, unlike other 1991bg-like SNe which are invariably associated with massive, old stellar populations. PTF09dav is also an outlier on the light-curve-width--luminosity and color--luminosity relations derived for other sub-luminous SNe Ia. The inferred 56Ni mass is small (0.019+/-0.003Msun), as is the estimated ejecta mass of 0.36Msun. Taken together, these properties make PTF09dav a remarkable event. We discuss various physical models that could explain PTF09dav. Helium shell detonation or deflagration on the surface of a CO white-dwarf can explain some of the features of PTF09dav, including the presence of Sc and the low photospheric velocities, but the observed Si and Mg are not predicted to be very abundant in these models. We conclude that no single model is currently capable of explaining all of the observed signatures of PTF09dav.
  • Type-IIn supernovae (SNe), which are characterized by strong interaction of their ejecta with the surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM), provide a unique opportunity to study the mass-loss history of massive stars shortly before their explosive death. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of a Type IIn SN, PTF 09uj, detected by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Serendipitous observations by GALEX at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths detected the rise of the SN light curve prior to the PTF discovery. The UV light curve of the SN rose fast, with a time scale of a few days, to a UV absolute AB magnitude of about -19.5. Modeling our observations, we suggest that the fast rise of the UV light curve is due to the breakout of the SN shock through the dense CSM (n~10^10 cm^-3). Furthermore, we find that prior to the explosion the progenitor went through a phase of high mass-loss rate (~0.1 solar mass per year) that lasted for a few years. The decay rate of this SN was fast relative to that of other SNe IIn.