• K. C. Chambers, E. A. Magnier, N. Metcalfe, H. A. Flewelling, M. E. Huber, C. Z. Waters, L. Denneau, P. W. Draper, D. Farrow, D. P. Finkbeiner, C. Holmberg, J. Koppenhoefer, P. A. Price, A. Rest, R. P. Saglia, E. F. Schlafly, S. J. Smartt, W. Sweeney, R. J. Wainscoat, W. S. Burgett, S. Chastel, T. Grav, J. N. Heasley, K. W. Hodapp, R. Jedicke, N. Kaiser, R.-P. Kudritzki, G. A. Luppino, R. H. Lupton, D. G. Monet, J. S. Morgan, P. M. Onaka, B. Shiao, C. W. Stubbs, J. L. Tonry, R. White, E. Bañados, E. F. Bell, R. Bender, E. J. Bernard, M. Boegner, F. Boffi, M. T. Botticella, A. Calamida, S. Casertano, W.-P. Chen, X. Chen, S. Cole, N. Deacon, C. Frenk, A. Fitzsimmons, S. Gezari, V. Gibbs, C. Goessl, T. Goggia, R. Gourgue, B. Goldman, P. Grant, E. K. Grebel, N.C. Hambly, G. Hasinger, A. F. Heavens, T. M. Heckman, R. Henderson, T. Henning, M. Holman, U. Hopp, W.-H. Ip, S. Isani, M. Jackson, C. D. Keyes, A. M. Koekemoer, R. Kotak, D. Le, D. Liska, K. S. Long, J. R. Lucey, M. Liu, N. F. Martin, G. Masci, B. McLean, E. Mindel, P. Misra, E. Morganson, D. N. A. Murphy, A. Obaika, G. Narayan, M. A. Nieto-Santisteban, P. Norberg, J. A. Peacock, E. A. Pier, M. Postman, N. Primak, C. Rae, A. Rai, A. Riess, A. Riffeser, H. W. Rix, S. Röser, R. Russel, L. Rutz, E. Schilbach, A. S. B. Schultz, D. Scolnic, L. Strolger, A. Szalay, S. Seitz, E. Small, K. W. Smith, D. R. Soderblom, P. Taylor, R. Thomson, A. N. Taylor, A. R. Thakar, J. Thiel, D. Thilker, D. Unger, Y. Urata, J. Valenti, J. Wagner, T. Walder, F. Walter, S. P. Watters, S. Werner, W. M. Wood-Vasey, R. Wyse
    Pan-STARRS1 has carried out a set of distinct synoptic imaging sky surveys including the $3\pi$ Steradian Survey and the Medium Deep Survey in 5 bands ($grizy_{P1}$). The mean 5$\sigma$ point source limiting sensitivities in the stacked 3$\pi$ Steradian Survey in $grizy_{P1}$ are (23.3, 23.2, 23.1, 22.3, 21.4) respectively. The upper bound on the systematic uncertainty in the photometric calibration across the sky is 7-12 millimag depending on the bandpass. The systematic uncertainty of the astrometric calibration using the Gaia frame comes from a comparison of the results with Gaia: the standard deviation of the mean and median residuals ($ \Delta ra, \Delta dec $) are (2.3, 1.7) milliarcsec, and (3.1, 4.8) milliarcsec respectively. The Pan-STARRS system and the design of the PS1 surveys are described and an overview of the resulting image and catalog data products and their basic characteristics are described together with a summary of important results. The images, reduced data products, and derived data products from the Pan-STARRS1 surveys are available to the community from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) at STScI.
  • This paper describes the organization of the database and the catalog data products from the Pan-STARRS1 $3\pi$ Steradian Survey. The catalog data products are available in the form of an SQL-based relational database from MAST, the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes at STScI. The database is described in detail, including the construction of the database, the provenance of the data, the schema, and how the database tables are related. Examples of queries for a range of science goals are included. The catalog data products are available in the form of an SQL-based relational database from MAST, the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes at STScI.
  • The Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium have carried out a set of imaging surveys using the 1.4 giga-pixel GPC1 camera on the PS1 telescope. As this camera is composed of many individual electronic readouts, and covers a very large field of view, great care was taken to ensure that the many instrumental effects were corrected to produce the most uniform detector response possible. We present the image detrending steps used as part of the processing of the data contained within the public release of the Pan-STARRS1 Data Release 1 (DR1). In addition to the single image processing, the methods used to transform the 375,573 individual exposures into a common sky-oriented grid are discussed, as well as those used to produce both the image stack and difference combination products.
  • We are conducting a proper-motion survey for young brown dwarfs in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud based on the Pan-STARRS1 3$\pi$ Survey. Our search uses multi-band photometry and astrometry to select candidates, and is wider (370 deg$^{2}$) and deeper (down to $\approx$3 M$_{\rm Jup}$) than previous searches. We present here our search methods and spectroscopic follow-up of our high-priority candidates. Since extinction complicates spectral classification, we have developed a new approach using low-resolution ($R \approx 100$) near-infrared spectra to quantify reddening-free spectral types, extinctions, and gravity classifications for mid-M to late-L ultracool dwarfs ($\approx 100-3$ M$_{\rm Jup}$ in Taurus). We have discovered 25 low-gravity (VL-G) and the first 11 intermediate-gravity (INT-G) substellar (M6-L1) members of Taurus, constituting the largest single increase of Taurus brown dwarfs to date. We have also discovered 1 new Pleiades member and 13 new members of the Perseus OB2 association, including a candidate very wide separation (58 kAU) binary. We homogeneously reclassify the spectral types and extinctions of all previously known Taurus brown dwarfs. Altogether our discoveries have thus far increased the substellar census in Taurus by $\approx 40\%$ and added three more L-type members ($\approx 5-10$ M$_{\rm Jup}$). Most notably, our discoveries reveal an older ($>$10 Myr) low-mass population in Taurus, in accord with recent studies of the higher-mass stellar members. The mass function appears to differ between the younger and older Taurus populations, possibly due to incompleteness of the older stellar members or different star formation processes.
  • We present optical light curves, redshifts, and classifications for 365 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Medium Deep Survey. We detail improvements to the PS1 SN photometry, astrometry and calibration that reduce the systematic uncertainties in the PS1 SN Ia distances. We combine the subset of 279 PS1 SN Ia ($0.03 < z < 0.68$) with useful distance estimates of SN Ia from SDSS, SNLS, various low-z and HST samples to form the largest combined sample of SN Ia consisting of a total of 1048 SN Ia ranging from $0.01 < z < 2.3$, which we call the `Pantheon Sample'. When combining Planck 2015 CMB measurements with the Pantheon SN sample, we find $\Omega_m=0.307\pm0.012$ and $w = -1.026\pm0.041$ for the wCDM model. When the SN and CMB constraints are combined with constraints from BAO and local H0 measurements, the analysis yields the most precise measurement of dark energy to date: $w0 = -1.007\pm 0.089$ and $wa = -0.222 \pm0.407$ for the w0waCDM model. Tension with a cosmological constant previously seen in an analysis of PS1 and low-z SNe has diminished after an increase of $2\times$ in the statistics of the PS1 sample, improved calibration and photometry, and stricter light-curve quality cuts. We find the systematic uncertainties in our measurements of dark energy are almost as large as the statistical uncertainties, primarily due to limitations of modeling the low-redshift sample. This must be addressed for future progress in using SN Ia to measure dark energy.
  • We use 1169 Pan-STARRS supernovae (SNe) and 195 low-$z$ ($z < 0.1$) SNe Ia to measure cosmological parameters. Though most Pan-STARRS SNe lack spectroscopic classifications, in a previous paper (I) we demonstrated that photometrically classified SNe can be used to infer unbiased cosmological parameters by using a Bayesian methodology that marginalizes over core-collapse (CC) SN contamination. Our sample contains nearly twice as many SNe as the largest previous SN Ia compilation. Combining SNe with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) constraints from Planck, we measure the dark energy equation of state parameter $w$ to be -0.989$\pm$0.057 (stat$+$sys). If $w$ evolves with redshift as $w(a) = w_0 + w_a(1-a)$, we find $w_0 = -0.912 \pm 0.149$ and $w_a =$ -0.513$\pm$0.826. These results are consistent with cosmological parameters from the Joint Lightcurve Analysis and the Pantheon sample. We try four different photometric classification priors for Pan-STARRS SNe and two alternate ways of modeling CC SN contamination, finding that no variant gives a $w$ differing by more than 2% from the baseline measurement. The systematic uncertainty on $w$ due to marginalizing over CC SN contamination, $\sigma_w^{\textrm{CC}} = 0.012$, is the third-smallest source of systematic uncertainty in this work. We find limited (1.6$\sigma$) evidence for evolution of the SN color-luminosity relation with redshift, a possible systematic that could constitute a significant uncertainty in future high-$z$ analyses. Our data provide one of the best current constraints on $w$, demonstrating that samples with $\sim$5% CC SN contamination can give competitive cosmological constraints when the contaminating distribution is marginalized over in a Bayesian framework.
  • We present light curves and classification spectra of 17 hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS). Our sample contains all objects from the PS1 MDS sample with spectroscopic classification that are similar to either of the prototypes SN2005ap or SN2007bi, without an explicit limit on luminosity. With a redshift range $0.3 < z < 1.6$, PS1MDS is the first SLSN sample primarily probing the high-redshift population; our multi-filter PS1 light curves probe the rest-frame UV emission, and hence the peak of the spectral energy distribution. We measure the temperature evolution and construct bolometric light curves, and find peak luminosities of $(0.5-5) \times 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and lower limits on the total radiated energies of $(0.3-2) \times 10^{51}$ erg. The light curve shapes are diverse, with both rise- and decline times spanning a factor of $\sim 5$, and several examples of double-peaked light curves. When correcting for the flux-limited nature of our survey, we find a median peak luminosity at 4000 {\AA} of $M_{\rm 4000} = -21.1$ mag, and a spread of $\sigma = 0.7$ mag.
  • We present a catalog of 9888 M, L and T dwarfs detected in the Pan-STARRS1 3$\pi$ Survey (PS1), covering three-quarters of the sky. Our catalog contains nearly all known objects of spectral types L0-T2 in the PS1 field, with objects as early as M0 and as late as T9, and includes PS1, 2MASS, AllWISE, and Gaia DR1 photometry. We analyze the different types of photometry reported by PS1, and use two types in our catalog to maximize both depth and accuracy. Using parallaxes from the literature, we construct empirical SEDs for field ultracool dwarfs spanning 0.5-12 $\mu$m. We determine typical colors of M0-T9 dwarfs, and we highlight the distinctive colors of subdwarfs and young objects. Our catalog includes 492 L dwarfs detected in $r_{\rm P1}$, the largest sample of L dwarfs detected at such blue wavelengths. We combine astrometry from PS1, 2MASS, and Gaia DR1 to calculate new proper motions for our catalog. We achieve a median precision of 2.9 mas yr$^{-1}$, a factor of $\approx$3-10 improvement over previous large catalogs. Our catalog contains proper motions for 2405 M6-T9 dwarfs and includes the largest set of homogeneous proper motions for L and T dwarfs published to date, 406 objects for which there were no previous measurements, and 1176 objects for which we improve upon previous literature values. We analyze the kinematics of ultracool dwarfs in our catalog and find evidence that bluer but otherwise generic late-M and L field dwarfs (i.e., not subdwarfs) tend to have higher tangential velocities compared to typical field objects. With the public release of the PS1 data, this survey will continue to be an essential tool for characterizing the ultracool dwarf population.
  • We present photometry and spectroscopy of nine Type II-P/L supernovae (SNe) with redshifts in the 0.045 < z < 0.335 range, with a view to re-examining their utility as distance indicators. Specifically, we apply the expanding photosphere method (EPM) and the standardized candle method (SCM) to each target, and find that both methods yield distances that are in reasonable agreement with each other. The current record-holder for the highest-redshift spectroscopically confirmed SN II-P is PS1-13bni (z = 0.335 +0.009 -0.012), and illustrates the promise of Type II SNe as cosmological tools. We updated existing EPM and SCM Hubble diagrams by adding our sample to those previously published. Within the context of Type II SN distance measuring techniques, we investigated two related questions. First, we explored the possibility of utilising spectral lines other than the traditionally used Fe II 5169 to infer the photospheric velocity of SN ejecta. Using local well-observed objects, we derive an epoch-dependent relation between the strong Balmer line and Fe II 5169 velocities that is applicable 30 to 40 days post-explosion. Motivated in part by the continuum of key observables such as rise time and decline rates exhibited from II-P to II-L SNe, we assessed the possibility of using Hubble-flow Type II-L SNe as distance indicators. These yield similar distances as the Type II-P SNe. Although these initial results are encouraging, a significantly larger sample of SNe II-L would be required to draw definitive conclusions.
  • Quasars are galaxies hosting accreting supermassive black holes; due to their brightness, they are unique probes of the early universe. To date, only few quasars have been reported at $z > 6.5$ ($<$800 Myr after the Big Bang). In this work, we present six additional $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars discovered using the Pan-STARRS1 survey. We use a sample of 15 $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars to perform a homogeneous and comprehensive analysis of this highest-redshift quasar population. We report four main results: (1) the majority of $z\gtrsim$6.5 quasars show large blueshifts of the broad CIV 1549\AA$\,$emission line compared to the systemic redshift of the quasars, with a median value $\sim$3$\times$ higher than a quasar sample at $z\sim$1; (2) we estimate the quasars' black hole masses (M$\rm_{BH}\sim$0.3$-$5 $\times$ 10$^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$) via modeling of the MgII 2798\AA$\,$emission line and rest-frame UV continuum; we find that quasars at high redshift accrete their material (with $\langle (L_{\mathrm{bol}}/L_{\mathrm{Edd}}) \rangle = 0.39$) at a rate comparable to a luminosity-matched sample at lower$-$redshift, albeit with significant scatter ($0.4$ dex); (3) we recover no evolution of the FeII/MgII abundance ratio with cosmic time; (4) we derive near zone sizes; together with measurements for $z\sim6$ quasars from recent work, we confirm a shallow evolution of the decreasing quasar near zone sizes with redshift. Finally, we present new millimeter observations of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m emission line and underlying dust continuum from NOEMA for four quasars, and provide new accurate redshifts and [CII]/infrared luminosities estimates. The analysis presented here shows the large range of properties of the most distant quasars.
  • We make use of a catalog of 1600 Pan-STARRS1 groups produced by the probability friends-of-friends algorithm to explore how the galaxy properties, i.e. the specific star formation rate (SSFR) and quiescent fraction, depend on stellar mass and group-centric radius. The work is the extension of Lin et al. (2014). In this work, powered by a stacking technique plus a background subtraction for contamination removal, a finer correction and more precise results are obtained than in our previous work. We find that while the quiescent fraction increases with decreasing group-centric radius the median SSFRs of star-forming galaxies in groups at fixed stellar mass drop slightly from the field toward the group center. This suggests that the major quenching process in groups is likely a fast mechanism. On the other hand, a reduction in SSFRs by ~0.2 dex is seen inside clusters as opposed to the field galaxies. If the reduction is attributed to the slow quenching effect, the slow quenching process acts dominantly in clusters. In addition, we also examine the density-color relation, where the density is defined by using a sixth-nearest neighbor approach. Comparing the quiescent fractions contributed from the density and radial effect, we find that the density effect dominates over the massive group or cluster galaxies, and the radial effect becomes more effective in less massive galaxies. The results support mergers and/or starvation as the main quenching mechanisms in the group environment, while harassment and/or starvation dominate in clusters.
  • The Pan-STARRS (PS1) Medium Deep Survey discovered over 5,000 likely supernovae (SNe) but obtained spectral classifications for just 10% of its SN candidates. We measured spectroscopic host galaxy redshifts for 3,147 of these likely SNe and estimate that $\sim$1,000 are Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) with light-curve quality sufficient for a cosmological analysis. We use these data with simulations to determine the impact of core-collapse SN (CC SN) contamination on measurements of the dark energy equation of state parameter, $w$. Using the method of Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS), distances to SNe Ia and the contaminating CC SN distribution are simultaneously determined. We test light-curve based SN classification priors for BEAMS as well as a new classification method that relies upon host galaxy spectra and the association of SN type with host type. By testing several SN classification methods and CC SN parameterizations on large SN simulations, we estimate that CC SN contamination gives a systematic error on $w$ ($\sigma_w^{CC}$) of 0.014, 29% of the statistical uncertainty. Our best method gives $\sigma_w^{CC} = 0.004$, just 8% of the statistical uncertainty, but could be affected by incomplete knowledge of the CC SN distribution. This method determines the SALT2 color and shape coefficients, $\alpha$ and $\beta$, with $\sim$3% bias. However, we find that some variants require $\alpha$ and $\beta$ to be fixed to known values for BEAMS to yield accurate measurements of $w$. Finally, the inferred abundance of bright CC SNe in our sample is greater than expected based on measured CC SN rates and luminosity functions.
  • We have analyzed images from the VST ATLAS survey to identify candidate gravitationally lensed quasar systems in a sample of WISE sources with W1 - W2 > 0.7. Results from followup spectroscopy with the Baade 6.5 m telescope are presented for eight systems. One of these is a quadruply lensed quasar and two are doubly lensed systems. Two are projected superpositions of two quasars at different redshifts. In one system two quasars, though at the same redshift, have very different emission line profiles, and constitute a physical binary. In two systems the component spectra are consistent with the lensing hypothesis, after allowing for micro-lensing. But as no lensing galaxy is detected in these two, we classify them as lensless twins. More extensive observations are needed to establish whether they are in fact lensed quasars or physical binaries.
  • We describe the selection of galaxies targeted in eight low redshift clusters (APMCC0917, A168, A4038, EDCC442, A3880, A2399, A119 and A85; $0.029 < z < 0.058$) as part of the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object integral field Spectrograph Galaxy Survey (SAMI-GS). We have conducted a redshift survey of these clusters using the AAOmega multi-object spectrograph on the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope. The redshift survey is used to determine cluster membership and to characterise the dynamical properties of the clusters. In combination with existing data, the survey resulted in 21,257 reliable redshift measurements and 2899 confirmed cluster member galaxies. Our redshift catalogue has a high spectroscopic completeness ($\sim 94\%$) for $r_{\rm petro} \leq 19.4$ and clustercentric distances $R< 2\rm{R}_{200}$. We use the confirmed cluster member positions and redshifts to determine cluster velocity dispersion, $\rm{R}_{200}$, virial and caustic masses, as well as cluster structure. The clusters have virial masses $14.25 \leq {\rm log }({\rm M}_{200}/\rm{M}_{\odot}) \leq 15.19$. The cluster sample exhibits a range of dynamical states, from relatively relaxed-appearing systems, to clusters with strong indications of merger-related substructure. Aperture- and PSF-matched photometry are derived from SDSS and VST/ATLAS imaging and used to estimate stellar masses. These estimates, in combination with the redshifts, are used to define the input target catalogue for the cluster portion of the SAMI-GS. The primary SAMI-GS cluster targets have $R< \rm{R}_{200}$, velocities $|v_{\rm pec}| < 3.5\sigma_{200}$ and stellar masses $9.5 \leq {\rm log(M}^*_{approx}/\rm{M}_{\odot}) \leq 12$. Finally, we give an update on the SAMI-GS progress for the cluster regions.
  • We present the discovery of eight young M7-L2 dwarfs in the Taurus star-forming region and the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association, serendipitously found during a wide-field search for L/T transition dwarfs using Pan-STARRS1 (optical) and WISE (mid-infrared) photometry. We identify PSO J060.3200+25.9644 (near-infrared spectral type L1) and PSO J077.1033+24.3809 (L2) as new members of Taurus based on their VL-G gravity classifications, the consistency of their photometry and proper motions with previously known Taurus objects, and the low probability of contamination by field objects. PSO J077.1033+24.3809 is the coolest substellar member of Taurus found to date. Both Taurus objects are among the lowest mass free-floating objects ever discovered, with estimated masses $\approx$6 M$_{\rm Jup}$, and provide further evidence that isolated planetary-mass objects can form as part of normal star-formation processes. PSO J060.3200+25.9644 (a.k.a. DANCe J040116.80+255752.2) was previously identified as a likely member of the Pleiades (age $\approx125$ Myr) based on photometry and astrometry, but its VL-G gravity classification and near-infrared photometry imply a much younger age and thus point to Taurus membership. We have also discovered six M7-L1 dwarfs in outlying regions of Scorpius-Centaurus with photometry, proper motions, and low-gravity spectral signatures consistent with membership. These objects have estimated masses $\approx$15-36 M$_{\rm Jup}$. The M7 dwarf, PSO J237.1470-23.1489, shows excess mid-infrared flux implying the presence of a circumstellar disk. Finally, we present catalogs of Pan-STARRS1 proper motions for low-mass members of Taurus and Upper Scorpius with median precisions of $\approx$3 mas yr$^{-1}$, including 67 objects with no previous proper motion and 359 measurements that improve on literature values.
  • We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band ($g$, $r$, $i$, $z$) light-curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts $z \approx 1$ or $z \approx 0.3$ that are relatively emission line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN, we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the $g$ band and the $riz$ bands. The detected lags are $\sim 2-3$ times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC5548 and micro-lensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from $g-r$ to $g-i$ and then to $g-z$ is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet FeII lines and MgII, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.
  • The evolution of brown dwarfs from L to T spectral types is one of the least understood aspects of the ultracool population, partly for lack of a large, well-defined, and well-characterized sample in the L/T transition. To improve the existing census, we have searched $\approx$28,000 deg$^2$ using the Pan-STARRS1 and WISE surveys for L/T transition dwarfs within 25 pc. We present 130 ultracool dwarf discoveries with estimated distances $\approx9-130$ pc, including 21 that were independently discovered by other authors and 3 that were previously identified as photometric candidates. Seventy-nine of our objects have near-IR spectral types of L6-T4.5, the most L/T transition dwarfs from any search to date, and we have increased the census of L9-T1.5 objects within 25 pc by over 50%. The color distribution of our discoveries provides further evidence for the "L/T gap," a deficit of objects with $(J-K)_{\rm MKO}\approx0.0-0.5$ mag in the L/T transition, and thus reinforces the idea that the transition from cloudy to clear photospheres occurs rapidly. Among our discoveries are 31 candidate binaries based on their low-resolution spectral features. Two of these candidates are common proper motion companions to nearby main sequence stars; if confirmed as binaries, these would be rare benchmark systems with the potential to stringently test ultracool evolutionary models. Our search also serendipitously identified 23 late-M and L dwarfs with spectroscopic signs of low gravity implying youth. Finally, we identify 10 candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMG) with spectral types L7-T4.5, including three showing spectroscopic signs of low gravity. If confirmed, any of these would be among the coolest known YMG members and would help to determine the effective temperature at which young brown dwarfs cross the L/T transition. (Abridged)
  • We present photometry and spectroscopy of PS1-14bj, a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at redshift $z=0.5215$ discovered in the last months of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. PS1-14bj stands out by its extremely slow evolution, with an observed rise of $\gtrsim 125$ rest-frame days, and exponential decline out to $\sim 250$ days past peak at a measured rate of $0.01~{\rm mag~day}^{-1}$, consistent with fully-trapped $^{56}$Co decay. This is the longest rise time measured in a SLSN to date, and the first SLSN to show a rise time consistent with pair-instability supernova (PISN) models. Compared to other slowly-evolving SLSNe, it is spectroscopically similar to the prototype SN2007bi at maximum light, though lower in luminosity ($L_{\rm peak} \simeq 4.6 \times 10^{43} {\rm erg s}^{-1}$) and with a flatter peak than previous events. PS1-14bj shows a number of peculiar properties, including a near-constant color temperature for $>200$ days past peak, and strong emission lines from [O III] $\lambda$5007 and [O III] $\lambda$4363 with a velocity width of $\sim$3400 km/s, in its late-time spectra. These both suggest there is a sustained source of heating over very long timescales, and are incompatible with a simple $^{56}$Ni-powered/PISN interpretation. A modified magnetar model including emission leakage at late times can reproduce the light curve, in which case the blue continuum and [O III] features are interpreted as material heated and ionized by the inner pulsar wind nebula becoming visible at late times. Alternatively, the late-time heating could be due to interaction with a shell of H-poor circumstellar material.
  • Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10^44 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-30 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6x10^-6 times that of the core-collapse rate.
  • Luminous quasars at z>5.6 can be studied in detail with the current generation of telescopes and provide us with unique information on the first gigayear of the universe. Thus far these studies have been statistically limited by the number of quasars known at these redshifts. Such quasars are rare and therefore wide-field surveys are required to identify them and multiwavelength data are needed to separate them efficiently from their main contaminants, the far more numerous cool dwarfs. In this paper, we update and extend the selection for z~6 quasars presented in Banados et al. (2014) using the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey. We present the PS1 distant quasar sample, which currently consists of 124 quasars in the redshift range 5.6<z<6.7 that satisfy our selection criteria. Seventy-seven of these quasars have been discovered with PS1, and 63 of them are newly identified in this paper. We present composite spectra of the PS1 distant quasar sample. This sample spans a factor of ~20 in luminosity and shows a variety of emission line properties. The number of quasars at z>5.6 presented in this work almost double the quasars previously known at these redshifts, marking a transition phase from studies of individual sources to statistical studies of the high-redshift quasar population, which was impossible with earlier, smaller samples.
  • We apply a combination of a Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) machine learning algorithm to solve two important problems faced by the astronomical community: star/galaxy separation, and photometric redshift estimation of galaxies in survey catalogs. We use the GA to select the relevant features in the first step, followed by optimization of SVM parameters in the second step to obtain an optimal set of parameters to classify or regress, in process of which we avoid over-fitting. We apply our method to star/galaxy separation in Pan-STARRS1 data. We show that our method correctly classifies 98% of objects down to i_P1= 24.5, with a completeness (or true positive rate) of 99% for galaxies, and 88% for stars. By combining colors with morphology, our star/classification method yields better results than the new SExtractor classifier spread_model in particular at the faint end (i_P1>22). We also use our method to derive photometric redshifts for galaxies in the COSMOS bright multi-wavelength dataset down to an error in (1+z) of sigma=0.013, which compares well with estimates from SED fitting on the same data (sigma=0.007) while making a significantly smaller number of assumptions.
  • The dust extinction curve is a critical component of many observational programs and an important diagnostic of the physics of the interstellar medium. Here we present new measurements of the dust extinction curve and its variation towards tens of thousands of stars, a hundred-fold larger sample than in existing detailed studies. We use data from the APOGEE spectroscopic survey in combination with ten-band photometry from Pan-STARRS1, 2MASS, and WISE. We find that the extinction curve in the optical through infrared is well characterized by a one-parameter family of curves described by R(V). The extinction curve is more uniform than suggested in past works, with sigma(R(V)) = 0.18, and with less than one percent of sight lines having R(V) > 4. Our data and analysis have revealed two new aspects of Galactic extinction: first, we find significant, wide-area variations in R(V) throughout the Galactic plane. These variations are on scales much larger than individual molecular clouds, indicating that R(V) variations must trace much more than just grain growth in dense molecular environments. Indeed, we find no correlation between R(V) and dust column density up to E(B-V) ~ 2. Second, we discover a strong relationship between R(V) and the far-infrared dust emissivity.
  • The Pan-Planets survey observed an area of 42 sq deg. in the galactic disk for about 165 hours. The main scientific goal of the project is the detection of transiting planets around M dwarfs. We establish an efficient procedure for determining the stellar parameters $T_{eff}$ and log$g$ of all sources using a method based on SED fitting, utilizing a three-dimensional dust map and proper motion information. In this way we identify more than 60000 M dwarfs, which is by far the largest sample of low-mass stars observed in a transit survey to date. We present several planet candidates around M dwarfs and hotter stars that are currently being followed up. Using Monte-Carlo simulations we calculate the detection efficiency of the Pan-Planets survey for different stellar and planetary populations. We expect to find $3.0^{+3.3}_{-1.6}$ hot Jupiters around F, G, and K dwarfs with periods lower than 10 days based on the planet occurrence rates derived in previous surveys. For M dwarfs, the percentage of stars with a hot Jupiter is under debate. Theoretical models expect a lower occurrence rate than for larger main sequence stars. However, radial velocity surveys find upper limits of about 1\% due to their small sample, while the Kepler survey finds a occurrence rate that we estimate to be at least $0.17(^{+0.67}_{-0.04})$%, making it even higher than the determined fraction from OGLE-III for F, G and K stellar types, $0.14(^{+0.15}_{-0.076})\%$. With the large sample size of Pan-Planets, we are able to determine an occurrence rate of $0.11(^{+0.37}_{-0.02})$% in case one of our candidates turns out to be a real detection. If, however, none of our candidates turn out to be true planets, we are able to put an upper limit of 0.34% with a 95% confidence on the hot Jupiter occurrence rate of M dwarfs. Therefore we cannot yet confirm the theoretical prediction of a lower occurrence rate for cool stars.
  • We present a recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry with new flat fields and zero points derived from Pan-STARRS1 (PS1). Using PSF photometry of 60 million stars with $16 < r < 20$, we derive a model of amplifier gain and flat-field corrections with per-run RMS residuals of 3 millimagnitudes (mmag) in $griz$ bands and 15 mmag in $u$ band. The new photometric zero points are adjusted to leave the median in the Galactic North unchanged for compatibility with previous SDSS work. We also identify transient non-photometric periods in SDSS ("contrails") based on photometric deviations co-temporal in SDSS bands. The recalibrated stellar PSF photometry of SDSS and PS1 has an RMS difference of {9,7,7,8} mmag in $griz$, respectively, when averaged over $15'$ regions.
  • In area and depth, the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3$\pi$ survey is unique among many-epoch, multi-band surveys and has enormous potential for all-sky identification of variable sources. PS1 has observed the sky typically seven times in each of its five bands ($grizy$) over 3.5 years, but unlike SDSS not simultaneously across the bands. Here we develop a new approach for quantifying statistical properties of non-simultaneous, sparse, multi-color lightcurves through light-curve structure functions, effectively turning PS1 into a $\sim 35$-epoch survey. We use this approach to estimate variability amplitudes and timescales $(\omega_r, \tau)$ for all point-sources brighter than $r_{\mathrm{P1}}=21.5$ mag in the survey. With PS1 data on SDSS Stripe 82 as ``ground truth", we use a Random Forest Classifier to identify QSOs and RR Lyrae based on their variability and their mean PS1 and WISE colors. We find that, aside from the Galactic plane, QSO and RR Lyrae samples of purity $\sim$75\% and completeness $\sim$92\% can be selected. On this basis we have identified a sample of $\sim 1,000,000$ QSO candidates, as well as an unprecedentedly large and deep sample of $\sim$150,000 RR Lyrae candidates with distances from $\sim$10 kpc to $\sim$120 kpc. Within the Draco dwarf spheroidal, we demonstrate a distance precision of 6\% for RR Lyrae candidates. We provide a catalog of all likely variable point sources and likely QSOs in PS1, a total of $25.8\times 10^6$ sources.