• Euclid-VIS is the large format visible imager for the ESA Euclid space mission in their Cosmic Vision program, scheduled for launch in 2020. Together with the near infrared imaging within the NISP instrument, it forms the basis of the weak lensing measurements of Euclid. VIS will image in a single r+i+z band from 550-900 nm over a field of view of ~0.5 deg2. By combining 4 exposures with a total of 2260 sec, VIS will reach to deeper than mAB=24.5 (10sigma) for sources with extent ~0.3 arcsec. The image sampling is 0.1 arcsec. VIS will provide deep imaging with a tightly controlled and stable point spread function (PSF) over a wide survey area of 15000 deg2 to measure the cosmic shear from nearly 1.5 billion galaxies to high levels of accuracy, from which the cosmological parameters will be measured. In addition, VIS will also provide a legacy dataset with an unprecedented combination of spatial resolution, depth and area covering most of the extra-Galactic sky. Here we will present the results of the study carried out by the Euclid Consortium during the period up to the Critical Design Review.
  • We report the direct observation of resistive flow through a weak link in a weakly interacting atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. Two weak links separate our ring-shaped superfluid atomtronic circuit into two distinct regions, a source and a drain. Motion of these weak links allows for creation of controlled flow between the source and the drain. At a critical value of the weak link velocity, we observe a transition from superfluid flow to superfluid plus resistive flow. Working in the hydrodynamic limit, we observe a conductivity that is 4 orders of magnitude larger than previously reported conductivities for a Bose-Einstein condensate with a tunnel junction. Good agreement with zero-temperature Gross-Pitaevskii simulations and a phenomenological model based on phase slips indicate that the creation of excitations plays an important role in the resulting conductivity. Our measurements of resistive flow elucidate the microscopic origin of the dissipation and pave the way for more complex atomtronic devices.
  • We report ALMA Early Science CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 1664. The BCG contains 1.1x10^{10} solar masses of molecular gas divided roughly equally between two distinct velocity systems: one from -250 to +250 km/s centred on the BCG's systemic velocity and a high velocity system blueshifted by 570 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity. The BCG's systemic component shows a smooth velocity gradient across the BCG center with velocity proportional to radius suggestive of solid body rotation about the nucleus. However, the mass and velocity structure are highly asymmetric and there is little star formation coincident with a putative disk. It may be an inflow of gas that will settle into a disk over several 10^8 yr. The high velocity system consists of two gas clumps, each ~2 kpc across, located to the north and southeast of the nucleus. Each has a line of sight velocity spread of 250-300 km/s. The velocity of the gas in the high velocity system tends to increase towards the BCG center and could signify a massive high velocity flow onto the nucleus. However, the velocity gradient is not smooth and these structures are also coincident with low optical-UV surface brightness regions, which could indicate dust extinction associated with each clump. If so, the high velocity gas would be projected in front of the BCG and moving toward us along the line of sight in a massive outflow most likely driven by the AGN. A merger origin is unlikely but cannot be ruled out.
  • The conversion of gas into stars is a fundamental process in astrophysics and cosmology. Stars are known to form from the gravitational collapse of dense clumps in interstellar molecular clouds, and it has been proposed that the resulting star formation rate is proportional to either the amount of mass above a threshold gas surface density, or the gas volume density. These star-formation prescriptions appear to hold in nearby molecular clouds in our Milky Way Galaxy's disk as well as in distant galaxies where the star formation rates are often much larger. The inner 500 pc of our Galaxy, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), contains the largest concentration of dense, high-surface density molecular gas in the Milky Way, providing an environment where the validity of star-formation prescriptions can be tested. Here we show that by several measures, the current star formation rate in the CMZ is an order-of-magnitude lower than the rates predicted by the currently accepted prescriptions. In particular, the region 1 deg < l < 3.5 deg, |b| < 0.5 deg contains ~10^7 Msun of dense molecular gas -- enough to form 1000 Orion-like clusters -- but the present-day star formation rate within this gas is only equivalent to that in Orion. In addition to density, another property of molecular clouds, such as the amplitude of turbulent motions, must be included in the star-formation prescription to predict the star formation rate in a given mass of molecular gas.
  • We analyze Spitzer GLIMPSE, MSX, and WMAP images of the Milky Way to identify 8 micron and free-free sources in the Galaxy. Seventy-two of the eighty-eight WMAP sources have coverage in the GLIMPSE and MSX surveys suitable for identifying massive star forming complexes (SFC). We measure the ionizing luminosity functions of the SFCs and study their role in the turbulent motion of the Galaxy's molecular gas. We find a total Galactic free-free flux f_{\nu} = 46177.6 Jy; the 72 WMAP sources with full 8 micron coverage account for 34263.5 Jy (~75%), with both measurements made at \nu=94GHz (W band). We find a total of 280 SFCs, of which 168 have unique kinematic distances and free-free luminosities. We use a simple model for the radial distribution of star formation to estimate the free-free and ionizing luminosity for the sources lacking distance determinations. The total dust-corrected ionizing luminosity is Q = 2.9 \pm 0.5 x 10^53 photons s^-1, which implies a galactic star formation rate of 1.2 \pm 0.2 M_{\sun} yr^-1. We present the (ionizing) luminosity function of the SFCs, and show that 24 sources emit half the ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy. The SFCs appear as bubbles in GLIMPSE or MSX images; the radial velocities associated with the bubble walls allow us to infer the expansion velocity of the bubbles. We calculate the kinetic luminosity of the bubble expansion and compare it to the turbulent luminosity of the inner molecular disk. SFCs emitting 80% of the total galactic free-free luminosity produce a kinetic luminosity equal to 65% of the turbulent luminosity in the inner molecular disk. This suggests that the expansion of the bubbles is a major driver of the turbulent motion of the inner Milky Way molecular gas.
  • We have tested the two main theoretical models of bubbles around massive star clusters, Castor et al. and Chevalier & Clegg, against observations of the well studied Carina Nebula. The Castor et al. theory over-predicts the X-ray luminosity in the Carina bubble by a factor of 60 and expands too rapidly, by a factor of 4; if the correct radius and age are used, the predicted X-ray luminosity is even larger. In contrast, the Chevalier & Clegg model under-predicts the X-ray luminosity by a factor of 10. We modify the Castor et al. theory to take into account lower stellar wind mass loss rates, radiation pressure, gravity, and escape of or energy loss from the hot shocked gas. We argue that energy is advected rather than radiated from the bubble. We undertake a parameter study for reduced stellar mass loss rates and for various leakage rates and are able to find viable models. The X-ray surface brightness in Carina is highest close to the bubble wall, which is consistent with conductive evaporation from cold clouds. The picture that emerges is one in which the hot gas pressure is far below that found by dividing the time-integrated wind luminosity by the bubble volume; rather, the pressure in the hot gas is set by pressure equilibrium with the photoionized gas at T=10^4 K. It follows that the shocked stellar winds are not dynamically important in forming the bubbles.
  • We investigate both experimentally and theoretically disorder induced damping of Bloch oscillations of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices. The spatially inhomogeneous force responsible for the damping is realised by a combination of a disordered optical and a magnetic gradient potential. We show that the inhomogeneity of this force results in a broadening of the quasimomentum spectrum, which in turn causes damping of the centre-of-mass oscillation. We quantitatively compare the obtained damping rates to the simulations using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Our results are relevant for high precision experiments on very small forces, which require the observation of a large number of oscillation cycles.
  • We argue that the X-ray and UV flux illuminating the parsec-scale accretion disk around luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) is super-Eddington with respect to the local far-infrared dust opacity. The far infrared opacity may be larger than in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way due to a combination of supersolar metallicity and the growth of dust grains in the dense accretion disk. Because of the irradiating flux, the outer accretion disk puffs up with a vertical thickness $h\sim R$. This provides a mechanism for generating a geometrically thick obscuring region from an intrinsically thin disk. We find obscuring columns $\sim 10^{22} - 10^{23} {\rm cm}^{-2}$, in reasonable agreement with observations.
  • Hubble Space Telescope images of MCG-6-30-15 show a dust lane crossing the galaxy just below the nucleus. In this paper, we argue that this dust lane is responsible for the observed reddening of the nuclear emission and the Fe I edge hinted at in the Chandra spectrum of MCG-6-30-15. We further suggest that the gas within the dust lane can comprise much of the low ionization component (i.e., the one contributing the O VII edge) of the observed warm absorber. Moreover, placing the warm absorbing material at such distances (hundreds of pc) can account for the small outflow velocities of the low ionization absorption lines as well as the constancy of the O VIII edge. Photoionization models of a dusty interstellar gas cloud (with a column appropriate for the reddening toward MCG-6-30-15) using a toy Seyfert 1 spectral energy distribution show that it is possible to obtain a significant O VII edge (\tau~0.2) if the material is ~150 pc from the ionizing source. For MCG-6-30-15, such a distance is consistent with the observed dust lane. The current data on MCG-6-30-15 is unable to constrain the dust composition within the warm absorber. Astronomical silicate is a viable candidate, but there are indications of a very low O abundance in the dust, which is inconsistent with a silicate origin. If true, this may indicate that there were repeated cycles of grain destruction and growth from shocks in the interstellar medium of MCG-6-30-15. Pure iron grains are an unlikely dust constituent due to the limit on their abundance in the Galaxy, yet they cannot be ruled out. The high column densities inferred from the highly ionized zone of the warm absorber implies that this gas is dust-free.
  • Our understanding of the Solar System has been revolutionized over the past decade by the finding that the orbits of the planets are inherently chaotic. In extreme cases, chaotic motions can change the relative positions of the planets around stars, and even eject a planet from a system. Moreover, the spin axis of a planet-Earth's spin axis regulates our seasons-may evolve chaotically, with adverse effects on the climates of otherwise biologically interesting planets. Some of the recently discovered extrasolar planetary systems contain multiple planets, and it is likely that some of these are chaotic as well.
  • The physical basis of chaos in the solar system is now better understood: in all cases investigated so far, chaotic orbits result from overlapping resonances. Perhaps the clearest examples are found in the asteroid belt. Overlapping resonances account for its Kirkwood gaps and were used to predict and find evidence for very narrow gaps in the outer belt. Further afield, about one new ``short-period'' comet is discovered each year. They are believed to come from the ``Kuiper Belt'' (at 40 AU or more) via chaotic orbits produced by mean-motion and secular resonances with Neptune. Finally, the planetary system itself is not immune from chaos. In the inner solar system, overlapping secular resonances have been identified as the possible source of chaos. For example, Mercury, in 10^{12} years, may suffer a close encounter with Venus or plunge into the Sun. In the outer solar system, three-body resonances have been identified as a source of chaos, but on an even longer time scale of 10^9 times the age of the solar system. On the human time scale, the planets do follow their orbits in a stately procession, and we can predict their trajectories for hundreds of thousands of years. That is because the mavericks, with shorter instability times, have long since been ejected. The solar system is not stable; it is just old!
  • We compare the metallicities of stars with radial velocity planets to the metallicity of a sample of field dwarfs. We confirm recent work indicating that the stars-with-planet sample as a whole is iron rich. However, the lowest mass stars tend to be iron poor, with several having [Fe/H]<-0.2, demonstrating that high metallicity is not required for the formation of short period Jupiter-mass planets. We show that the average [Fe/H] increases with increasing stellar mass (for masses below 1.25 solar masses) in both samples, but that the increase is much more rapid in the stars-with-planet sample. The variation of metallicity with stellar age also differs between the two samples. We examine possible selection effects related to variations in the sensitivity of radial velocity surveys with stellar mass and metallicity, and identify a color cutoff (B-V>0.48) that contributes to but does not explain the mass-metallicity trend in the stars-with-planets sample. We use Monte Carlo models to show that adding an average of 6.5 Earth masses of iron to each star can explain both the mass-metallicity and the age-metallicity relations of the stars-with-planets sample. However, for at least one star, HD 38529, there is good evidence that the bulk metallicity is high. We conclude that the observed metallicities and metallicity trends are the result of the interaction of three effects; accretion of about 6 Earth masses of iron rich material, selection effects, and in some cases, high intrinsic metallicity.
  • We examine the eccentricity evolution of a system of two planets locked in a mean motion resonance, in which the outer planet loses energy and angular momentum. The sink of energy and angular momentum could be either a gas or planetesimal disk. We show that the eccentricity of both planetary bodies can grow to large values, particularly if the inner body does not directly exchange energy or angular momentum with the disk. We analytically calculate the eccentricity damping rate in the case of a single planet migrating through a planetesimal disk. We present the results of numerical integrations of two resonant planets showing rapid growth of eccentricity. We also present integrations in which a Jupiter-mass planet is forced to migrate inward through a system of 5-10 roughly Earth mass planets. The migrating planet can eject or accrete the smaller bodies; roughly 5% of the mass (averaged over all the integrations) accretes onto the central star. The results are discussed in the context of the currently known extrasolar planetary systems.
  • We study spectroscopically determined iron abundances of 642 solar-type stars to search for the signature of accreted iron-rich material. We find that the metallicity [Fe/H] of a subset of 466 main sequence stars, when plotted as a function of stellar mass, mimics the pattern seen in lithium abundances in open clusters. Using Monte Carlo models we find that, on average, these stars have accreted about 0.4 Earth masses of iron while on the main sequence. A much smaller sample of 19 stars in the Hertzsprung gap, which are slightly evolved and whose convection zones are significantly more massive, have lower average [Fe/H], and their metallicity shows no clear variation with stellar mass. These findings suggest that terrestrial-type material is common around solar type stars.
  • Classical analytic theories of the solar system indicate that it is stable, but numerical integrations suggest that it is chaotic. This disagreement is resolved by a new analytic theory. The theory shows that the chaos among the Jovian planets results from the overlap of the components of a mean motion resonance among Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, and provides rough estimates of the Lyapunov time (10 million years) and the dynamical lifetime of Uranus (10^{18} years). The Jovian planets must have entered the resonance after all the gas and most of the planetesimals in the protoplanetary disk were removed.
  • Using the disk wind model of Murray et al. (1995), we calculate line profiles and frequency-resolved response functions for broad line emission from the surface of an accretion disk in an AGN in the presence of a radiatively driven wind. We find that the combined effects of the shears in the wind and in the disk itself produce anisotropic line emission which solves several well-known problems connected with disk models of the broad line region. In particular, the broadening of resonance lines such as \Civ, \Lya, and \Nv\/ can be attributed to orbital motion of the disk gas at radii as close as $\sim 10^{16}$~cm in Seyferts without requiring unrealistically large emission regions in order to produce single-peaked profiles. Furthermore, the anisotropy of the line emission results in frequency-dependent response functions which are no longer red-blue symmetric so that the time delays inferred for the various red and blue components of the line agree qualitatively with recent reverberation mapping observations of NGC~5548.