• We study how photocurrent develops spatially and temporally in noncentrosymmetric systems in response to a femtosecond light pulse by employing recently developed time-dependent nonequilibrium Green function algorithms scaling linearly in the number of time steps and capable of treating nonperturbative effects in the amplitude of external time-dependent fields. The pulse irradiating the middle segment of a Rice-Mele tight-binding chain of finite length, sandwiched between two normal metal leads, induces nonequilibrium charge carriers which propagate toward the leads in {\em superballistic} fashion---signified by time dependence of the displacement $\sim t^\nu$ with $\nu > 1$---in both clean and disordered chains. When the center frequency $\hbar \Omega$ of the pulse is about half of the energy gap of the device, non-zero DC component of photocurrent appears in the leads scaling with the square of the pulse intensity as the signature of {\em two-photon} absorption that was missed in previous perturbative analyses. For $\hbar \Omega$ larger than the gap, we find {\em one-photon} absorption with photocurrent linear in intensity. The same, but gapless (i.e., short enough to allow evanescent wave functions from the leads to fill the gap), device exhibits photocurrent at all frequencies with its DC component $\propto \Omega^2$ at low $\Omega$, thereby revealing shift current as a realization of nonadiabatic quantum charge pumping enabled by {\em breaking of left-right symmetry} of the device structure. This points out to a much wider class of systems, than the usually considered bulk polar materials, which can be exploited to optimize shift-current-based solar cells.
  • We study the interplay of electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions in the course of electron-hole bound state formation for gapped solid state systems. Adapting the essentially approximation-free diagrammatic Monte Carlo method for the calculation of the optical response, we discuss the absorption of light in correlated electron-phonon systems for the whole interaction and phonon frequency regimes. The spectral function obtained by analytical continuation from the imaginary-time current-current correlation function demonstrates the dressing of excitons by a phonon cloud when the coupling the lattice degrees of freedom becomes increasingly important, where notable differences show up between the adiabatic and anti-adiabatic cases.
  • Electron transport coupled with magnetism has attracted attention over the years as exemplified in anomalous Hall effect due to a Berry phase in momentum space. Another type of unconventional Hall effect -- topological Hall effect, originating from the real-space Berry phase, has recently become of great importance in the context of magnetic skyrmions. We have observed topological Hall effect in bilayers consisting of ferromagnetic SrRuO$_3$ and paramagnetic SrIrO$_3$ over a wide region of both temperature and magnetic field. The topological term rapidly decreases with the thickness of SrRuO$_3$, ending up with the complete disappearance at 7 unit cells of SrRuO$_3$. Combined with model calculation, we concluded that the topological Hall effect is driven by interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which is caused by both the broken inversion symmetry and the strong spin-orbit coupling of SrIrO$_3$. Such interaction is expected to realize the N\'{e}el-type magnetic skyrmion, of which size is estimated to be $\sim$10 nm from the magnitude of topological Hall resistivity. The results established that the high-quality oxide interface enables us to tune the chirality of the system; this can be a step towards the future topological electronics.
  • Interplay of spin, charge, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom in oxide heterostructures results in a plethora of fascinating properties, which can be exploited in new generations of electronic devices with enhanced functionalities. The paradigm example is the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) that hosts two-dimensional electron system (2DES). Apart from the mobile charge carriers, this system exhibits a range of intriguing properties such as field effect, superconductivity and ferromagnetism, whose fundamental origins are still debated. Here, we use soft-X-ray angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to penetrate through the LAO overlayer and access charge carriers at the buried interface. The experimental spectral function directly identifies the interface charge carriers as large polarons, emerging from coupling of charge and lattice degrees of freedom, and involving two phonons of different energy and thermal activity. This phenomenon fundamentally limits the carrier mobility and explains its puzzling drop at high temperatures.
  • By breaking the time-reversal-symmetry in three-dimensional topological insulators with introduction of spontaneous magnetization or application of magnetic field, the surface states become gapped, leading to quantum anomalous Hall effect or quantum Hall effect, when the chemical potential locates inside the gap. Further breaking of inversion symmetry is possible by employing magnetic topological insulator heterostructures that host nondegenerate top and bottom surface states. Here, we demonstrate the tailored-material approach for the realization of robust quantum Hall states in the bilayer system, in which the cooperative or cancelling combination of the anomalous and ordinary Hall responses from the respective magnetic and non-magnetic layers is exemplified. The appearance of quantum Hall states at filling factor 0 and +1 can be understood by the relationship of energy band diagrams for the two independent surface states. The designable heterostructures of magnetic topological insulator may explore a new arena for intriguing topological transport and functionality.
  • We have investigated magneto-transport properties in a single crystal of pyrochore-type Nd2Ir2O7. The metallic conduction is observed on the antiferromagnetic domain walls of the all-in all-out type Ir-5d moment ordered insulating bulk state, that can be finely controlled by external magnetic field along [111]. On the other hand, an applied field along [001] induces the bulk phase transition from insulator to semimetal as a consequence of the field-induced modification of Nd-4f and Ir-5d moment configurations. A theoretical calculation consistently describing the experimentally observed features suggests a variety of exotic topological states as functions of electron correlation and Ir-5d moment orders which can be finely tuned by choice of rare-earth ion and by magnetic field, respectively.
  • Spontaneously emergent chirality is an issue of fundamental importance across the natural sciences. It has been argued that a unidirectional (chiral) rotation of a mechanical ratchet is forbidden in thermal equilibrium, but becomes possible in systems out of equilibrium. Here we report our finding that a topologically nontrivial spin texture known as a skyrmion - a particle-like object in which spins point in all directions to wrap a sphere - constitutes such a ratchet. By means of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy we show that micron-sized crystals of skyrmions in thin films of Cu2OSeO3 and MnSi display a unidirectional rotation motion. Our numerical simulations based on a stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation suggest that this rotation is driven solely by thermal fluctuations in the presence of a temperature gradient, whereas in thermal equilibrium it is forbidden by the Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem. We show that the rotational flow of magnons driven by the effective magnetic field of skyrmions gives rise to the skyrmion rotation, therefore suggesting that magnons can be used to control the motion of these spin textures.
  • Magnetic skyrmion, a swirling spin texture, in chiral magnets is characterized by (i) nano-scale size ($\sim$1nm -- 100nm), (ii) topological stability, and (iii) gyro-dynamics. These features are shown to be advantageous for (a) high-density data-storage, (b) nonvolatile memory, and (c) ultra-low current and energy cost manipulation, respectively. By the numerical simulations of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, the elementary functions of skyrmions are demonstrated aiming at the design principles of skyrmionic memory devices.
  • The three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) is a novel state of matter as characterized by two-dimensional (2D) metallic Dirac states on its surface. Bi-based chalcogenides such as Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3 and their combined/mixed compounds like Bi2Se2Te and (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 are typical members of 3D-TIs which have been intensively studied in forms of bulk single crystals and thin films to verify the topological nature of the surface states. Here, we report the realization of the Quantum Hall effect (QHE) on the surface Dirac states in (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 films (x = 0.84 and 0.88). With electrostatic gate-tuning of the Fermi level in the bulk band gap under magnetic fields, the quantum Hall states with filling factor \nu = \pm 1 are resolved with quantized Hall resistance of Ryx = h/e2 and zero longitudinal resistance, owing to chiral edge modes at top/bottom surface Dirac states. Furthermore, the appearance of a \nu = 0 state (\sigma xy = 0) reflects a pseudo-spin Hall insulator state when the Fermi level is tuned in between the energy levels of the non-degenerate top and bottom surface Dirac points. The observation of the QHE in 3D TI films may pave a way toward TI-based electronics.
  • The transport properties at finite temperature of crystalline organic semiconductors are investigated, within the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model, by combining exact diagonalization technique, Monte Carlo approaches, and maximum entropy method. The temperature-dependent mobility data measured in single crystals of rubrene are successfully reproduced: a crossover from super- to sub-diffusive motion occurs in the range $150 \leq T \leq 200$ K, where the mean free path becomes of the order of the lattice parameter and strong memory effects start to appear. We provide an effective model which can successfully explain low frequencies features of the absorption spectra. The observed response to slowly varying electric field is interpreted by means of a simple model where the interaction between the charge carrier and lattice polarization modes is simulated by a harmonic interaction between a fictitious particle and an electron embedded in a viscous fluid.
  • We present the first unbiased results for the mobility $\mu$ of one-dimensional Holstein polaron obtained by numerical analytic continuation combined with diagrammatic and world-line Monte Carlo methods in the thermodynamic limit. We have identified for the first time, by the characteristic $\omega$ and $T$ dependence in the wide region of parameters, several distinct regimes in the $\lambda-T$ plane including band conduction region, incoherent metallic region, activated hopping region, and high temperature saturation region. We observe for the first time that although mobilities and mean free paths at different values of $\lambda$ differ by many orders of magnitude at small temperatures, their values at $T$ larger than the bandwidth become very close to each other.
  • The Kubo formula for the electrical conductivity is rewritten in terms of a sum of Drude-like contributions associated to the exact eigenstates of the interacting system, each characterized by its own frequency-dependent relaxation time. The structure of the novel and equivalent formulation, weighting the contribution from each eigenstate by its Boltzmann occupation factor, simplifies considerably the access to the static properties (dc conductivity) and resolves the long standing difficulties to recover the Boltzmann result for dc conductivity from the Kubo formula. It is shown that the Boltzmann result, containing the correct transport scattering time instead of the electron lifetime determined by the Green function, can be recovered in problems with elastic and inelastic scattering at the lowest order of interaction.
  • We study the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in proximity-induced ferromagnetic palladium and platinum which is widely used in spintronics, within the Berry phase formalism based on the relativistic band structure calculations. We find that both the anomalous Hall ($\sigma_{xy}^A$) and Nernst ($\alpha_{xy}^A$) conductivities can be related to the spin Hall conductivity ($\sigma_{xy}^S$) and band exchange-splitting ($\Delta_{ex}$) by relations $\sigma_{xy}^A =\Delta_{ex}\frac{e}{\hbar}\sigma_{xy}^S(E_F)'$ and $\alpha_{xy}^A = -\frac{\pi^2}{3}\frac{k_B^2T\Delta_{ex}}{\hbar}\sigma_{xy}^s(\mu)"$, respectively. In particular, these relations would predict that the $\sigma_{xy}^A$ in the magnetized Pt (Pd) would be positive (negative) since the $\sigma_{xy}^S(E_F)'$ is positive (negative). Furthermore, both $\sigma_{xy}^A$ and $\alpha_{xy}^A$ are approximately proportional to the induced spin magnetic moment ($m_s$) because the $\Delta_{ex}$ is a linear function of $m_s$. Using the reported $m_s$ in the magnetized Pt and Pd, we predict that the intrinsic anomalous Nernst conductivity (ANC) in the magnetic platinum and palladium would be gigantic, being up to ten times larger than, e.g., iron, while the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) would also be significant.
  • We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) highly spin-polarized electron accumulation layers commonly appearing near the surface of n-type polar semiconductors BiTeX (X = I, Br, and Cl) by angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Due to the polarity and the strong spin-orbit interaction built in the bulk atomic configurations, the quantized conduction-band subbands show giant Rashba-type spin-splitting. The characteristic 2D confinement effect is clearly observed also in the valence-bands down to the binding energy of 4 eV. The X-dependent Rashba spin-orbit coupling is directly estimated from the observed spin-split subbands, which roughly scales with the inverse of the band-gap size in BiTeX.
  • We study the magnetic susceptibility of a layered semiconductor BiTeI with giant Rashba spin splitting both theoretically and experimentally to explore its orbital magnetism. Apart from the core contributions, a large temperature-dependent diamagnetic susceptibility is observed when the Fermi energy E_F is near the crossing point of the conduction bands, while the susceptibility turns to be paramagnetic when E_F is away from it. These features are consistent with first-principles calculations, which also predict an enhanced orbital magnetic susceptibility with both positive and negative signs as a function of E_F due to band (anti)crossings. Based on these observations, we propose two mechanisms for an enhanced paramagnetic orbital susceptibility.
  • Bismuth-chalchogenides are model examples of three-dimensional topological insulators. Their ideal bulk-truncated surface hosts a single spin-helical surface state, which is the simplest possible surface electronic structure allowed by their non-trivial $\mathbb{Z}_2$ topology. They are therefore widely regarded ideal templates to realize the predicted exotic phenomena and applications of this topological surface state. However, real surfaces of such compounds, even if kept in ultra-high vacuum, rapidly develop a much more complex electronic structure whose origin and properties have proved controversial. Here, we demonstrate that a conceptually simple model, implementing a semiconductor-like band bending in a parameter-free tight-binding supercell calculation, can quantitatively explain the entire measured hierarchy of electronic states. In combination with circular dichroism in angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) experiments, we further uncover a rich three-dimensional spin texture of this surface electronic system, resulting from the non-trivial topology of the bulk band structure. Moreover, our study reveals how the full surface-bulk connectivity in topological insulators is modified by quantum confinement.
  • The spectral response and physical features of the 2D Hubbard-Holstein model are calculated both in equilibrium at zero and low chemical dopings, and after an ultra short powerful light pulse, in undoped systems. At equilibrium and at strong charge-lattice couplings, the optical conductivity reveals a 3-peak structure in agreement with experimental observations. After an ultra short pulse and at nonzero electron-phonon interaction, phonon and spin subsystems oscillate with the phonon period $T_{ph} \approx 80$ fs. The decay time of the phonon oscillations is about 150-200 fs, similar to the relaxation time of the charge system. We propose a criterion for observing these oscillations in high $T_c$ compounds: the time span of the pump light pulse $\tau_{pump}$ has to be shorter than the phonon oscillation period $T_{ph}$.
  • We study the magneto-optical (MO) response of polar semiconductor BiTeI with giant bulk Rashba spin splitting at various carrier densities. Despite being non-magnetic, the material is found to yield a huge MO activity in the infrared region under moderate magnetic fields (<3 T). By comparison with first-principles calculations, we show that such an enhanced MO response is mainly due to the intraband transitions between the Rashba-split bulk conduction bands in BiTeI, which give rise to distinct novel features and systematic doping dependence of the MO spectra. We further predict an even more pronounced enhancement in the low-energy MO response and dc Hall effect near the crossing (Dirac) point of the conduction bands.
  • In layered polar semiconductor BiTeI, giant Rashba-type spin-split band dispersions show up due to the crystal structure asymmetry and the strong spin-orbit interaction. Here we investigate the 3-dimensional (3D) bulk band structures of BiTeI using the bulk-sensitive $h\nu$-dependent soft x-ray angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SX-ARPES). The obtained band structure is shown to be well reproducible by the first-principles calculations, with huge spin splittings of ${\sim}300$ meV at the conduction-band-minimum and valence-band-maximum located in the $k_z=\pi/c$ plane. It provides the first direct experimental evidence of the 3D Rashba-type spin splitting in a bulk compound.
  • We have investigated the thermal Hall effect of magnons for various ferromagnetic insulators. For pyrochlore ferromagnetic insulators Lu$_2$V$_2$O$_7$, Ho$_2$V$_2$O$_7$, and In$_2$Mn$_2$O$_7$, finite thermal Hall conductivities have been observed below the Curie temperature $T_C$ . From the temperature and magnetic field dependences, it is concluded that magnons are responsible for the thermal Hall effect. The Hall effect of magnons can be well explained by the theory based on the Berry curvature in momentum space induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. The analysis has been extended to the transition metal (TM) oxides with perovskite structure. The thermal Hall signal was absent or far smaller in La$_2$NiMnO$_6$ and YTiO$_3$, which have the distorted perovskite structure with four TM ions in the unit cell. On the other hand, a finite thermal Hall response is discernible below $T_C$ in another ferromagentic perovskite oxide BiMnO$_3$, which shows orbital ordering with a larger unit cell. The presence or absence of the thermal Hall effect in insulating pyrochlore and perovskite systems reflect the geometric and topological aspect of DM-induced magnon Hall effect.
  • The spin-orbit interaction affects the electronic structure of solids in various ways. Topological insulators are one example where the spin-orbit interaction leads the bulk bands to have a non-trivial topology, observable as gapless surface or edge states. Another example is the Rashba effect, which lifts the electron-spin degeneracy as a consequence of spin-orbit interaction under broken inversion symmetry. It is of particular importance to know how these two effects, i.e. the non-trivial topology of electronic states and Rashba spin splitting, interplay with each other. Here we show, through sophisticated first-principles calculations, that BiTeI, a giant bulk Rashba semiconductor, turns into a topological insulator under a reasonable pressure. This material is shown to exhibit several unique features such as, a highly pressure-tunable giant Rashba spin splitting, an unusual pressure-induced quantum phase transition, and more importantly the formation of strikingly different Dirac surface states at opposite sides of the material.
  • We study theoretically a fundamental issue in solids: the evolution of the optical spectra of polaron as the electron-phonon coupling increases. By comparing the exact results obtained by diagrammatic Monte Carlo method and the data got through exact diagonalization within an appropriate subspace of the phononic wavefunctions, the physical nature of the crossover from weak to strong coupling is revealed. The optical spectra are well understood by the quantum mechanical superposition of states with light and heavy phonon clouds corresponding to large and small polarons, respectively. It is also found that the strong coupling Franck-Condon regime is not accessible at realistic values of the coupling constant.
  • We present a combined study of the angle-resolved-photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and quantum Monte Carlo simulations to propose a novel polaronic metallic state in underdoped cuprates. An approximation scheme is proposed to represent underdoped cuprates away from 1/2 filling, replacing the many-body Hamiltonian by that of a single polaron with effective electron-phonon interaction (EPI), that successfully explains many puzzles such as a large momentum-dependent dichotomy between nodal and anti-nodal directions, and an unconventional doping dependence of ARPES in the underdoped region.
  • We theoretically propose the necessary conditions for realization of giant Rashba splitting in bulk systems. In addition to (i) the large atomic spin-orbit interaction in an inversion-asymmetric system, the following two conditions are further required; (ii) a narrow band gap, and (iii) the presence of top valence and bottom conduction bands of symmetrically the same character. As a representative example, using the first principles calculations, the recently discovered giant bulk Rashba splitting system BiTeI is shown to fully fulfill all these three conditions. Of particular importance, by predicting the correct crystal structure of BiTeI, different from what has been believed thus far, the third criterion is demonstrated to be met by a negative crystal field splitting of the top valence bands.
  • We study a single polaron in the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model using four different techniques (three numerical and one analytical). Polarons show a smooth crossover from weak to strong coupling, as a function of the electron-phonon coupling strength $\lambda$, in all models where this coupling depends only on phonon momentum $q$. In the SSH model the coupling also depends on the electron momentum $k$; we find it has a sharp transition, at a critical coupling strength $\lambda_c$, between states with zero and nonzero momentum of the ground state. All other properties of the polaron are also singular at $\lambda = \lambda_c$, except the average number of phonons in the polaronic cloud. This result is representative of all polarons with coupling depending on $k$ and $q$, and will have important experimental consequences (eg., in ARPES and conductivity experiments).