• A. De Angelis, V. Tatischeff, I. A. Grenier, J. McEnery, M. Mallamaci, M. Tavani, U. Oberlack, L. Hanlon, R. Walter, A. Argan, P. Von Ballmoos, A. Bulgarelli, A. Bykov, M. Hernanz, G. Kanbach, I. Kuvvetli, M. Pearce, A. Zdziarski, J. Conrad, G. Ghisellini, A. Harding, J. Isern, M. Leising, F. Longo, G. Madejski, M. Martinez, M. N. Mazziotta, J. M. Paredes, M. Pohl, R. Rando, M. Razzano, A. Aboudan, M. Ackermann, A. Addazi, M. Ajello, C. Albertus, J. M. Alvarez, G. Ambrosi, S. Anton, L. A. Antonelli, A. Babic, B. Baibussinov, M. Balbo, L. Baldini, S. Balman, C. Bambi, U. Barres de Almeida, J. A. Barrio, R. Bartels, D. Bastieri, W. Bednarek, D. Bernard, E. Bernardini, T. Bernasconi, B. Bertucci, A. Biland, E. Bissaldi, M. Boettcher, V. Bonvicini, V. Bosch Ramon, E. Bottacini, V. Bozhilov, T. Bretz, M. Branchesi, V. Brdar, T. Bringmann, A. Brogna, C. Budtz Jorgensen, G. Busetto, S. Buson, M. Busso, A. Caccianiga, S. Camera, R. Campana, P. Caraveo, M. Cardillo, P. Carlson, S. Celestin, M. Cermeno, A. Chen, C. C Cheung, E. Churazov, S. Ciprini, A. Coc, S. Colafrancesco, A. Coleiro, W. Collmar, P. Coppi, R. Curado da Silva, S. Cutini, F. DAmmando, B. De Lotto, D. de Martino, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, L. Delgado, R. Diehl, S. Dietrich, A. D. Dolgov, A. Dominguez, D. Dominis Prester, I. Donnarumma, D. Dorner, M. Doro, M. Dutra, D. Elsaesser, M. Fabrizio, A. FernandezBarral, V. Fioretti, L. Foffano, V. Formato, N. Fornengo, L. Foschini, A. Franceschini, A. Franckowiak, S. Funk, F. Fuschino, D. Gaggero, G. Galanti, F. Gargano, D. Gasparrini, R. Gehrz, P. Giammaria, N. Giglietto, P. Giommi, F. Giordano, M. Giroletti, G. Ghirlanda, N. Godinovic, C. Gouiffes, J. E. Grove, C. Hamadache, D. H. Hartmann, M. Hayashida, A. Hryczuk, P. Jean, T. Johnson, J. Jose, S. Kaufmann, B. Khelifi, J. Kiener, J. Knodlseder, M. Kole, J. Kopp, V. Kozhuharov, C. Labanti, S. Lalkovski, P. Laurent, O. Limousin, M. Linares, E. Lindfors, M. Lindner, J. Liu, S. Lombardi, F. Loparco, R. LopezCoto, M. Lopez Moya, B. Lott, P. Lubrano, D. Malyshev, N. Mankuzhiyil, K. Mannheim, M. J. Marcha, A. Marciano, B. Marcote, M. Mariotti, M. Marisaldi, S. McBreen, S. Mereghetti, A. Merle, R. Mignani, G. Minervini, A. Moiseev, A. Morselli, F. Moura, K. Nakazawa, L. Nava, D. Nieto, M. Orienti, M. Orio, E. Orlando, P. Orleanski, S. Paiano, R. Paoletti, A. Papitto, M. Pasquato, B. Patricelli, M. A. PerezGarcia, M. Persic, G. Piano, A. Pichel, M. Pimenta, C. Pittori, T. Porter, J. Poutanen, E. Prandini, N. Prantzos, N. Produit, S. Profumo, F. S. Queiroz, S. Raino, A. Raklev, M. Regis, I. Reichardt, Y. Rephaeli, J. Rico, W. Rodejohann, G. Rodriguez Fernandez, M. Roncadelli, L. Roso, A. Rovero, R. Ruffini, G. Sala, M. A. SanchezConde, A. Santangelo, P. Saz Parkinson, T. Sbarrato, A. Shearer, R. Shellard, K. Short, T. Siegert, C. Siqueira, P. Spinelli, A. Stamerra, S. Starrfield, A. Strong, I. Strumke, F. Tavecchio, R. Taverna, T. Terzic, D. J. Thompson, O. Tibolla, D. F. Torres, R. Turolla, A. Ulyanov, A. Ursi, A. Vacchi, J. Van den Abeele, G. Vankova Kirilovai, C. Venter, F. Verrecchia, P. Vincent, X. Wang, C. Weniger, X. Wu, G. Zaharijas, L. Zampieri, S. Zane, S. Zimmer, A. Zoglauer, the eASTROGAM collaboration
    e-ASTROGAM (enhanced ASTROGAM) is a breakthrough Observatory space mission, with a detector composed by a Silicon tracker, a calorimeter, and an anticoincidence system, dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV - the lower energy limit can be pushed to energies as low as 150 keV for the tracker, and to 30 keV for calorimetric detection. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Thanks to its performance in the MeV-GeV domain, substantially improving its predecessors, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on the surroundings. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, e-ASTROGAM will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and LISA.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the abundance evolution of the elements from H to U in the Milky Way halo and local disk. We use a consistent chemical evolution model, metallicity dependent isotopic yields from low and intermediate mass stars and yields from massive stars which include, for the first time, the combined effect of metallicity, mass loss and rotation for a large grid of stellar masses and for all stages of stellar evolution. The yields of massive stars are weighted by a metallicity dependent function of the rotational velocities, constrained by observations as to obtain a primary-like $^{14}$N behavior at low metallicity and to avoid overproduction of s-elements at intermediate metallicities. We show that the solar system isotopic composition can be reproduced to better than a factor of two for isotopes up to the Fe-peak, and at the 10\% level for most pure s-isotopes, both light ones (resulting from the weak s-process in rotating massive stars) and the heavy ones (resulting from the main s-process in low and intermediate mass stars). We conclude that the light element primary process (LEPP), invoked to explain the apparent abundance deficiency of the s-elements with A< 100, is not necessary. We also reproduce the evolution of the heavy to light s-elements abundance ratio ([hs/ls]) - recently observed in unevolved thin disk stars - as a result of the contribution of rotating massive stars at sub-solar metallicities. We find that those stars produce primary F and dominate its solar abundance and we confirm their role in the observed primary behavior of N. In contrast, we show that their action is insufficient to explain the small observed values of C12/C13 in halo red giants, which is rather due to internal processes in those stars.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The survey covers the whole Virgo cluster region from its core to one virial radius (104 deg^2). The sensitivity of the survey is of f(Halpha) ~ 4 x 10^-17 erg sec-1 cm^-2 (5 sigma detection limit) for point sources and Sigma (Halpha) ~ 2 x 10^-18 erg sec^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 (1 sigma detection limit at 3 arcsec resolution) for extended sources, making VESTIGE the deepest and largest blind narrow-band survey of a nearby cluster. This paper presents the survey in all its technical aspects, including the survey design, the observing strategy, the achieved sensitivity in both the narrow-band Halpha+[NII] and in the broad-band r filter used for the stellar continuum subtraction, the data reduction, calibration, and products, as well as its status after the first observing semester. We briefly describe the Halpha properties of galaxies located in a 4x1 deg^2 strip in the core of the cluster north of M87, where several extended tails of ionised gas are detected. This paper also lists the main scientific motivations of VESTIGE, which include the study of the effects of the environment on galaxy evolution, the fate of the stripped gas in cluster objects, the star formation process in nearby galaxies of different type and stellar mass, the determination of the Halpha luminosity function and of the Halpha scaling relations down to ~ 10^6 Mo stellar mass objects, and the reconstruction of the dynamical structure of the Virgo cluster. This unique set of data will also be used to study the HII luminosity function in hundreds of galaxies, the diffuse Halpha+[NII] emission of the Milky Way at high Galactic latitude, and the properties of emission line galaxies at high redshift.
  • Recent observations suggest a "double-branch" behaviour of Li/H versus metallicity in the local thick and thin discs. This is reminiscent of the corresponding O/Fe versus Fe/H behaviour, which has been explained as resulting from radial migration in the Milky Way disc. We use a semi-analytical model of disc evolution with updated chemical yields and parameterised radial migration. We explore the cases of long-lived (red giants of a few Gy lifetime) and shorter-lived (Asymptotic Giant Branch stars of several 10$^8$ yr) stellar sources of Li, as well as those of low and high primordial Li. We show that both factors play a key role in the overall Li evolution. We find that the observed "two-branch" Li behaviour is only directly obtained in the case of long-lived stellar Li sources and low primordial Li. In all other cases, the data imply systematic Li depletion in stellar envelopes, thus no simple picture of the Li evolution can be obtained. This concerns also the reported Li/H decrease at supersolar metallicities.
  • The spatial distribution of elemental abundances in the disc of our Galaxy gives insights both on its assembly process and subsequent evolution, and on the stellar nucleogenesis of the different elements. Gradients can be traced using several types of objects as, for instance, (young and old) stars, open clusters, HII regions, planetary nebulae. We aim at tracing the radial distributions of abundances of elements produced through different nucleosynthetic channels -the alpha-elements O, Mg, Si, Ca and Ti, and the iron-peak elements Fe, Cr, Ni and Sc - by using the Gaia-ESO idr4 results of open clusters and young field stars. From the UVES spectra of member stars, we determine the average composition of clusters with ages >0.1 Gyr. We derive statistical ages and distances of field stars. We trace the abundance gradients using the cluster and field populations and we compare them with a chemo-dynamical Galactic evolutionary model. Results. The adopted chemo-dynamical model, with the new generation of metallicity-dependent stellar yields for massive stars, is able to reproduce the observed spatial distributions of abundance ratios, in particular the abundance ratios of [O/Fe] and [Mg/Fe] in the inner disc (5 kpc<RGC <7 kpc), with their differences, that were usually poorly explained by chemical evolution models. Often, oxygen and magnesium are considered as equivalent in tracing alpha-element abundances and in deducing, e.g., the formation time-scales of different Galactic stellar populations. In addition, often [alpha/Fe] is computed combining several alpha-elements. Our results indicate, as expected, a complex and diverse nucleosynthesis of the various alpha-elements, in particular in the high metallicity regimes, pointing towards a different origin of these elements and highlighting the risk of considering them as a single class with common features.
  • We use N-body chemo-dynamic simulations to study the coupling between morphology, kinematics and metallicity of the bar/bulge region of our Galaxy. We make qualitative comparisons of our results with available observations and find very good agreement. We conclude that this region is complex, since it comprises several stellar components with different properties -- i.e. a boxy/peanut bulge, thin and thick disc components, and, to lesser extents, a disky pseudobulge, a stellar halo and a small classical bulge -- all cohabiting in dynamical equilibrium. Our models show strong links between kinematics and metallicity, or morphology and metallicity, as already suggested by a number of recent observations. We discuss and explain these links.
  • The chemical evolution of lithium in the Milky Way represents a major problem in modern astrophysics. Indeed, lithium is, on the one hand, easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and, on the other hand, produced at some specific stellar evolutionary stages that are still not well constrained. The goal of this paper is to investigate the lithium stellar content of Milky Way stars in order to put constraints on the lithium chemical enrichment in our Galaxy, in particular in both the thin and thick discs. Thanks to high-resolution spectra from the ESO archive and high quality atmospheric parameters, we were able to build a massive and homogeneous catalogue of lithium abundances for 7300 stars derived with an automatic method coupling, a synthetic spectra grid, and a Gauss-Newton algorithm. We validated these lithium abundances with literature values, including those of the Gaia benchmark stars. In terms of lithium galactic evolution, we show that the interstellar lithium abundance increases with metallicity by 1 dex from [M/H]=-1 dex to +0.0 dex. Moreover, we find that this lithium ISM abundance decreases by about 0.5 dex at super-solar metalllicity. Based on a chemical separation, we also observed that the stellar lithium content in the thick disc increases rather slightly with metallicity, while the thin disc shows a steeper increase. The lithium abundance distribution of alpha-rich, metal-rich stars has a peak at A(Li)~3 dex. We conclude that the thick disc stars suffered of a low lithium chemical enrichment, showing lithium abundances rather close to the Spite plateau while the thin disc stars clearly show an increasing lithium chemical enrichment with the metallicity, probably thanks to the contribution of low-mass stars.
  • We study radial migration and chemical evolution in a bar-dominated disk galaxy, by analyzing the results of a fully self-consistent, high resolution N-body+SPH simulation. We find different behaviours for gas and star particles. Gas within corotation is driven in the central regions by the bar, where it forms a pseudo-bulge (disky-bulge), but it undergoes negligible radial displacement outside the bar region. Stars undergo substantial radial migration at all times, caused first by transient spiral arms and later by the bar. Despite the important amount of radial migration occurring in our model, its impact on the chemical properties is limited. The reason is the relatively flat abundance profile, due to the rapid early evolution of the whole disk. We show that the implications of radial migration on chemical evolution can be studied to a good accuracy by post-processing the results of the N-body+SPH calculation with a simple chemical evolution model having detailed chemistry and a parametrized description of radial migration. We find that radial migration impacts on chemical evolution both directly (by moving around the long-lived agents of nucleosynthesis, like e.g. SNIa or AGB stars, and thus altering the abundance profiles of the gas) and indirectly (by moving around the long-lived tracers of chemical evolution and thus affecting stellar metallicity profiles, local age-metallicity relations and metallicity distributions of stars, etc.).
  • Long Gamma Ray Bursts (LGRBs) are related to the final stages of evolution of massive stars. As such, they should follow the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies. We can use them to probe for star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in the distant universe following this assumption. The relation between the rate of LGRBs in a given galaxy and its SFR (that we call the LGRB "bias") may be complex, as we have indications that the LGRB hosts are not perfect analogues to the general population of SFGs. In this work, we try to quantify the dependence of the LGRB bias on physical parameters of their host galaxy such as the SFR or the stellar mass. We propose an empirical method based on the comparison of stellar mass functions (and SFR distributions) of LGRB hosts and of SFGs in order to find how the bias depends on the stellar mass or the SFR. By applying this method to a sample of LGRB hosts at redshifts lower than 1.1, where the properties of SFGs are well established, and where the properties of LGRB host galaxies can be deduced from observations (for stellar masses larger than 10**9.25 Msun and SFR larger than 1.8 Msun / yr), we find that the LGRB bias depends on both the stellar mass and SFR. We find that the bias decreases with the SFR, i.e. we see no preference for highly SFGs, once taken into account the larger number of massive stars in galaxies with larger SFR. We do not find any trend with the specific star formation rate (SSFR) but the dynamical range in SSFR in our study is narrow. Although through an indirect method, we relate these trends to a possible decrease of the LGRBs rate / SFR ratio with the metallicity. The method we propose suggests trends that may be useful to constrain models of LGRB progenitors, showing a clear decrease of the LGRB bias with the metallicity. This is promising for the future as the number of LGRB hosts studied will increase.
  • A major paradigm shift has recently revolutionized our picture of globular clusters (GC) that were long thought to be simple systems of coeval stars born out of homogeneous material. Indeed, detailed abundance studies of GC long-lived low-mass stars performed with 8-10m class telescopes, together with high-precision photometry of Galactic GCs obtained with HST,have brought compelling clues on the presence of multiple stellar populations in individual GCs. These stellar subgroups can be recognized thanks to their different chemical properties (more precisely by abundance differences in light elements from carbon to aluminium; see Bragaglia, this volume) and by the appearance of multimodal sequences in the colour-magnitude diagrams (see Piotto, this volume). This has a severe impact on our understanding of the early evolution of GCs, and in particular of the possible role that massive stars played in shaping the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and in inducing secondary star formation. Here we summarize the detailed timeline we have recently proposed for the first 40 Myrs in the lifetime of a typical GC following the general ideas of our so-called "Fast Rotating Massive stars scenario" (FRMS, Decressin et al. 2007b) and taking into account the dynamics of interstellar bubbles produced by stellar winds and supernovae. More details can be found in Krause et al. (2012, 2013).
  • We reassess the problem of the production and evolution of the light elements Li, Be and B and of their isotopes in the Milky Way, in the light of new observational and theoretical developments. The main novelty is the introduction of a new scheme for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays (GCR), which for the first time enables a self-consistent calculation of their composition during galactic evolution. The scheme accounts for key features of the present-day GCR source composition, it is based on the wind yields of the Geneva models of rotating, mass losing stars and it is fully coupled to a detailed galactic chemical evolution code. We find that the adopted GCR source composition accounts naturally for the observations of primary Be and helps understanding why Be follows closer Fe than O. We find that GCR produce ~70% of the solar B11/B10 isotopic ratio; the remaining 30% of B11 presumably result from neutrino-nucleosynthesis in massive star explosions. We find that GCR and primordial nucleosynthesis can make at most 30% of solar Li. At least half of solar Li has to originate in low-mass stellar sources (red giants, asymptotic giant branch stars or novae), but the required average yields of those sources are found to be much larger than obtained in current models of stellar nucleosynthesis. We also present radial profiles of LiBeB elemental and isotopic abundances in the Milky Way disc. We argue that the shape of those profiles - and the late evolution of LiBeB in general - reveals important features of the production of those light elements through primary and secondary processes.
  • We propose to perform a continuously scanning all-sky survey from 200 keV to 80 MeV achieving a sensitivity which is better by a factor of 40 or more compared to the previous missions in this energy range. The Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy (GRIPS) mission addresses fundamental questions in ESA's Cosmic Vision plan. Among the major themes of the strategic plan, GRIPS has its focus on the evolving, violent Universe, exploring a unique energy window. We propose to investigate $\gamma$-ray bursts and blazars, the mechanisms behind supernova explosions, nucleosynthesis and spallation, the enigmatic origin of positrons in our Galaxy, and the nature of radiation processes and particle acceleration in extreme cosmic sources including pulsars and magnetars. The natural energy scale for these non-thermal processes is of the order of MeV. Although they can be partially and indirectly studied using other methods, only the proposed GRIPS measurements will provide direct access to their primary photons. GRIPS will be a driver for the study of transient sources in the era of neutrino and gravitational wave observatories such as IceCUBE and LISA, establishing a new type of diagnostics in relativistic and nuclear astrophysics. This will support extrapolations to investigate star formation, galaxy evolution, and black hole formation at high redshifts.
  • The first gamma-ray line originating from outside the solar system that was ever detected is the 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy. Despite 30 years of intense theoretical and observational investigation, the main sources of positrons have not been identified up to now. Observations in the 1990's with OSSE/CGRO showed that the emission is strongly concentrated towards the Galactic bulge. In the 2000's, the SPI instrument aboard ESA's INTEGRAL gamma-ray observatory allowed scientists to measure that emission across the entire Galaxy, revealing that the bulge/disk luminosity ratio is larger than observed in any other wavelength. This mapping prompted a number of novel explanations, including rather "exotic ones (e.g. dark matter annihilation). However, conventional astrophysical sources, like type Ia supernovae, microquasars or X-ray binaries, are still plausible candidates for a large fraction of the observed total 511 keV emission of the bulge. A closer study of the subject reveals new layers of complexity, since positrons may propagate far away from their production sites, making it difficult to infer the underlying source distribution from the observed map of 511 keV emission. However, contrary to the rather well understood propagation of high energy (>GeV) particles of Galactic cosmic rays, understanding the propagation of low energy (~MeV) positrons in the turbulent, magnetized interstellar medium, still remains a formidable challenge. We review the spectral and imaging properties of the observed 511 keV emission and we critically discuss candidate positron sources and models of positron propagation in the Galaxy.
  • We study the chemical evolution of the disks of the Milky Way (MW) and of Andromeda (M31), in order to reveal common points and differences between the two major galaxies of the Local group. We use a large set of observational data for M31, including recent observations of the Star Formation Rate (SFR) and gas profiles, as well as stellar metallicity distributions along its disk. We show that, when expressed in terms of the corresponding disk scale lengths, the observed radial profiles of MW and M31 exhibit interesting similarities, suggesting the possibility of a description within a common framework. We find that the profiles of stars, gas fraction and metallicity of the two galaxies, as well as most of their global properties, are well described by our model, provided the star formation efficiency in M31 disk is twice as large as in the MW. We show that the star formation rate profile of M31 cannot be fitted with any form of the Kennicutt-Schmidt law (KS Law) for star formation. We attribute those discrepancies to the fact that M31 has undergone a more active star formation history, even in the recent past, as suggested by observations of a "head-on" collision with the neighboring M32 galaxy about 200 Myr ago. The MW has most probably undergone a quiescent secular evolution, making possible a fairly successful description with a simple model. If M31 is more typical of spiral galaxies, as recently suggested by Hammer et al. (2007), more complex models, involving galaxy interactions, will be required for the description of spirals.
  • We propose to advance investigations of electromagnetic radiation originating in atomic nuclei beyond its current infancy to a true astronomy. This nuclear emission is independent from conditions of gas, thus complements more traditional stronomical methods used to probe the nearby universe. Radioactive gamma-rays arise from isotopes which are made in specific locations inside massive stars, their decay in interstellar space traces an otherwise not directly observable hot and tenuous phase of the ISM, which is crucial for feedback from massive stars. Its intrinsic clocks can measure characteristic times of processes within the ISM. Frontier questions that can be addressed with studies in this field are the complex interiors of massive stars and supernovae which are key agents in galactic dynamics and chemical evolution, the history of star-forming and supernova activity affecting our solar-system environment, and explorations of occulted and inaccessible regions of young stellar nurseries in our Galaxy.
  • I review our current understanding of positron sources in the Galaxy, on the basis of the reported properties of the observed 511 keV annihilation line. It is argued here that most of the disk positrons propagate away from the disk and the resulting low surface brightness annihilation emission is currently undetectable by SPI/INTEGRAL. It is also argued that a large fraction of the disk positrons may be transported via the regular magnetic field of the Galaxy into the bulge and annihilate there. These ideas may alleviate current difficulties in interepreting INTEGRAL results in a "conventional" framework.
  • I discuss three different topics concerning the chemical evolution of the Milky Way (MW). 1) The metallicity distribution of the MW halo; it is shown that this distribution can be analytically derived in the framework of the hierarchical merging scenario for galaxy formation, assuming that the component sub-haloes had chemical properties similar to those of the progenitors of satellite galaxies of the MW. 2) The age-metallicity relationship (AMR) in the solar neighborhood; I argue for caution in deriving from data with important uncertainties (such as the age uncertainties in the Geneva-Kopenhaguen survey) a relationship between average metallicity and age: derived relationships are shown to be systematically flatter than the true ones and should not be directly compared to models. 3) The radial mixing of stars in the disk, which may have important effects on various observables (scatter in AMR, extension of the tails of the metallicity distribution, flatenning of disk abundance profiles). Recent SPH + N-body simulations find considerable radial mixing, but only comparison to observations will ultimately determine the extent of that mixing.
  • We propose the Wind of Fast Rotating Massive Stars scenario to explain the origin of the abundance anomalies observed in globular clusters. We compute and present models of fast rotating stars with initial masses between 20 and 120 Msun for an initial metallicity Z=0.0005 ([Fe/H]=-1.5). We discuss the nucleosynthesis in the H-burning core of these objects and present the chemical composition of their ejecta. We consider the impact of uncertainties in the relevant nuclear reaction rates. Fast rotating stars reach the critical velocity at the beginning of their evolution and remain near the critical limit during the rest of the main sequence and part of the He-burning phase. As a consequence they lose large amounts of material through a mechanical wind which probably leads to the formation of a slow outflowing disk. The material in this slow wind is enriched in H-burning products and presents abundance patterns similar to the chemical anomalies observed in globular cluster stars. In particular, the C, N, O, Na and Li variations are well reproduced by our model. However the rate of the 24Mg(p,gamma) has to be increased by a factor 1000 around 50 MK in order to reproduce the whole amplitude of the observed Mg-Al anticorrelation. We discuss how the long-lived low-mass stars currently observed in globular clusters could have formed out of the slow wind material ejected by massive stars.
  • The recent detection of gamma-ray lines from radioactive Al26 and Fe60 in the Milky Way by the RHESSI satellite calls for a reassessment of the production sites of those nuclides. The observed gamma-ray line flux ratio is in agreement with calculations of nucleosynthesis in massive stars, exploding as SNII (Woosley and Weaver 1995); in the light of those results, this observation would suggest then that SNII are the major sources of Al26 in the Milky Way, since no other conceivable source produces substantial amounts of Fe60. However, more recent theoretical studies find that SNII produce much higher Fe60/Al26 ratios than previously thought and, therefore, they cannot be the major Al26 sources in the Galaxy (otherwise Fe60 would be detected long ago, with a line flux similar to the one of Al26). Wolf-Rayet stars, ejecting Al26 (but not Fe60) in their stellar winds, appear then as a most natural candidate. We point out, however, that this scenario faces also an important difficulty. Forthcoming results of ESA's INTEGRAL satellite, as well as consistent calculations of nucleosynthesis in massive stars (including stars of initial masses as high as 100 M_sun and metallicities up to 3 Z_sun), are required to settle the issue.
  • We reassess the applicability of the Toomre criterion in galactic disks and we study the local star formation law in 16 disk galaxies for which abundance gradients are published. The data we use consists of stellar light profiles, atomic and molecular gas (deduced from CO with a metallicity-dependent conversion factor), star formation rates (from H-alpha emissivities), metallicities, dispersion velocities and rotation curves. We show that the Toomre criterion applies successfully to the case of the Milky Way disk, but it has limited success with the data of our sample; depending on whether the stellar component is included or not in the stability analysis, we find average values for the threshold ratio of the gas surface density to the critical surface density in the range 0.5 to 0.7. We also test various star formation laws proposed in the literature, i.e. either the simple Schmidt law or modifications of it, that take into account dynamical factors. We find only small differences among them as far as the overall fit to our data is concerned; in particular, we find that all three SF laws (with parameters derived from the fits to our data) match particularly well observations in the Milky Way disk. In all cases we find that the exponent n of our best fit SFR has slightly higher values than in other recent works and we suggest several reasons that may cause that discrepancy.
  • Based on the results of recent surveys, we have constructed a relatively homogeneous set of observational data concerning the chemical and photometric properties of Low Surface Brightness galaxies (LSBs). We have compared the properties of this data set with the predictions of models of the chemical and spectrophotometric evolution of LSBs. The basic idea behind the models, i.e. that LSBs are similar to 'classical' High Surface Brightness spirals except for a larger angular momentum, is found to be consistent with the results of their comparison with these data. However, some observed properties of the LSBs (e.g. their colours, and specifically the existence of red LSBs) as well as the large scatter in these properties, cannot be reproduced by the simplest models with smoothly evolving star formation rates over time. We argue that the addition of bursts and/or truncations in the star formation rate histories can alleviate that discrepancy.
  • We develop a detailed model of the Milky Way (a ``prototypical'' disk galaxy) and extend it to other disks with the help of some simple scaling relations, obtained in the framework of Cold Dark Matter models. This phenomenological (``hybrid'') approach to the study of disk galaxy evolution allows us to reproduce successfully a large number of observed properties of disk galaxies in the local Universe and up to redshift z~1. The important conclusion is that, on average, massive disks have formed the bulk of their stars earlier than their lower mass counterparts: the ``star formation hierarchy'' has been apparently opposite to the ``dark matter assembly'' hierarchy. It is not yet clear whether ``feedback'' (as used in semi-analytical models of galaxy evolution) can explain that discrepancy.
  • We show that simple models of the chemical and spectrophotometric evolution of galaxies can be used to explore the properties of present-day galaxies and especially the causes of the observed variety among disc galaxies. We focus on the link between ``classical'' spirals and Low Surface Brightness galaxies.
  • A description is given of the samples of Low Surface Brightness galaxies (LSBs) used for comparison with models of their chemical and spectro-photometric evolution (Boissier et al., this Volume). These samples show the large variation and scatter in observed global properties of LSBs, some of which cannot be modeled without adding starbursts or truncations to their star formation history.
  • In this review I focus on a few selected topics, where recent theoretical and/or observational progress has been made and important developments are expected in the future. They include: 1) Evolution of isotopic ratios, 2) Mixing processes and dispersion in abundance ratios, 3) Abundance gradients in the Galactic disk (and abundance patterns in the inner Galaxy), 4) The question of primary Nitrogen and 5) Abundance patterns in extragalactic damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs).