• A. De Angelis, V. Tatischeff, I. A. Grenier, J. McEnery, M. Mallamaci, M. Tavani, U. Oberlack, L. Hanlon, R. Walter, A. Argan, P. Von Ballmoos, A. Bulgarelli, A. Bykov, M. Hernanz, G. Kanbach, I. Kuvvetli, M. Pearce, A. Zdziarski, J. Conrad, G. Ghisellini, A. Harding, J. Isern, M. Leising, F. Longo, G. Madejski, M. Martinez, M. N. Mazziotta, J. M. Paredes, M. Pohl, R. Rando, M. Razzano, A. Aboudan, M. Ackermann, A. Addazi, M. Ajello, C. Albertus, J. M. Alvarez, G. Ambrosi, S. Anton, L. A. Antonelli, A. Babic, B. Baibussinov, M. Balbo, L. Baldini, S. Balman, C. Bambi, U. Barres de Almeida, J. A. Barrio, R. Bartels, D. Bastieri, W. Bednarek, D. Bernard, E. Bernardini, T. Bernasconi, B. Bertucci, A. Biland, E. Bissaldi, M. Boettcher, V. Bonvicini, V. Bosch Ramon, E. Bottacini, V. Bozhilov, T. Bretz, M. Branchesi, V. Brdar, T. Bringmann, A. Brogna, C. Budtz Jorgensen, G. Busetto, S. Buson, M. Busso, A. Caccianiga, S. Camera, R. Campana, P. Caraveo, M. Cardillo, P. Carlson, S. Celestin, M. Cermeno, A. Chen, C. C Cheung, E. Churazov, S. Ciprini, A. Coc, S. Colafrancesco, A. Coleiro, W. Collmar, P. Coppi, R. Curado da Silva, S. Cutini, F. DAmmando, B. De Lotto, D. de Martino, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, L. Delgado, R. Diehl, S. Dietrich, A. D. Dolgov, A. Dominguez, D. Dominis Prester, I. Donnarumma, D. Dorner, M. Doro, M. Dutra, D. Elsaesser, M. Fabrizio, A. FernandezBarral, V. Fioretti, L. Foffano, V. Formato, N. Fornengo, L. Foschini, A. Franceschini, A. Franckowiak, S. Funk, F. Fuschino, D. Gaggero, G. Galanti, F. Gargano, D. Gasparrini, R. Gehrz, P. Giammaria, N. Giglietto, P. Giommi, F. Giordano, M. Giroletti, G. Ghirlanda, N. Godinovic, C. Gouiffes, J. E. Grove, C. Hamadache, D. H. Hartmann, M. Hayashida, A. Hryczuk, P. Jean, T. Johnson, J. Jose, S. Kaufmann, B. Khelifi, J. Kiener, J. Knodlseder, M. Kole, J. Kopp, V. Kozhuharov, C. Labanti, S. Lalkovski, P. Laurent, O. Limousin, M. Linares, E. Lindfors, M. Lindner, J. Liu, S. Lombardi, F. Loparco, R. LopezCoto, M. Lopez Moya, B. Lott, P. Lubrano, D. Malyshev, N. Mankuzhiyil, K. Mannheim, M. J. Marcha, A. Marciano, B. Marcote, M. Mariotti, M. Marisaldi, S. McBreen, S. Mereghetti, A. Merle, R. Mignani, G. Minervini, A. Moiseev, A. Morselli, F. Moura, K. Nakazawa, L. Nava, D. Nieto, M. Orienti, M. Orio, E. Orlando, P. Orleanski, S. Paiano, R. Paoletti, A. Papitto, M. Pasquato, B. Patricelli, M. A. PerezGarcia, M. Persic, G. Piano, A. Pichel, M. Pimenta, C. Pittori, T. Porter, J. Poutanen, E. Prandini, N. Prantzos, N. Produit, S. Profumo, F. S. Queiroz, S. Raino, A. Raklev, M. Regis, I. Reichardt, Y. Rephaeli, J. Rico, W. Rodejohann, G. Rodriguez Fernandez, M. Roncadelli, L. Roso, A. Rovero, R. Ruffini, G. Sala, M. A. SanchezConde, A. Santangelo, P. Saz Parkinson, T. Sbarrato, A. Shearer, R. Shellard, K. Short, T. Siegert, C. Siqueira, P. Spinelli, A. Stamerra, S. Starrfield, A. Strong, I. Strumke, F. Tavecchio, R. Taverna, T. Terzic, D. J. Thompson, O. Tibolla, D. F. Torres, R. Turolla, A. Ulyanov, A. Ursi, A. Vacchi, J. Van den Abeele, G. Vankova Kirilovai, C. Venter, F. Verrecchia, P. Vincent, X. Wang, C. Weniger, X. Wu, G. Zaharijas, L. Zampieri, S. Zane, S. Zimmer, A. Zoglauer, the eASTROGAM collaboration
    e-ASTROGAM (enhanced ASTROGAM) is a breakthrough Observatory space mission, with a detector composed by a Silicon tracker, a calorimeter, and an anticoincidence system, dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV - the lower energy limit can be pushed to energies as low as 150 keV for the tracker, and to 30 keV for calorimetric detection. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Thanks to its performance in the MeV-GeV domain, substantially improving its predecessors, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on the surroundings. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, e-ASTROGAM will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and LISA.
  • The POLAR detector is a space based Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) polarimeter with a wide field of view, which covers almost half the sky. The instrument uses Compton scattering of gamma rays on a plastic scintillator hodoscope to measure the polarization of the incoming photons. The instrument has been successfully launched on board of the Chinese space laboratory Tiangong~2 on September 15, 2016. The construction of the instrument components is described in this article. Details are provided on problems encountered during the construction phase and their solutions. Initial performance of the instrument in orbit is as expected from ground tests and Monte Carlo simulation.
  • POLAR is a new satellite-born detector aiming to measure the polarization of an unprecedented number of Gamma-Ray Bursts in the 50-500 keV energy range. The instrument, launched on-board the Tiangong-2 Chinese Space lab on the 15th of September 2016, is designed to measure the polarization of the hard X-ray flux by measuring the distribution of the azimuthal scattering angles of the incoming photons. A detailed understanding of the polarimeter and specifically of the systematic effects induced by the instrument's non-uniformity are required for this purpose. In order to study the instrument's response to polarization, POLAR underwent a beam test at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France. In this paper both the beam test and the instrument performance will be described. This is followed by an overview of the Monte Carlo simulation tools developed for the instrument. Finally a comparison of the measured and simulated instrument performance will be provided and the instrument response to polarization will be presented.
  • POLAR is space-borne detector designed for a precise measurement of gamma-ray polarization of the prompt emissions of Gamma-Ray Bursts in the energy range 50 keV - 500 keV. POLAR is a compact Compton polarimeter consisting of 40$\times$ 40 plastic scintillator bars read out by 25 multi-anode PMTs. In May 2015, we performed a series of tests of the POLAR flight model with 100\% polarized x-rays beams at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility beam-line ID11 aming to study thresholds, crosstalk between channels and responses of POLAR flight model to polarized X-ray beams. In this paper we present the data analysis method and some analysis results. According the results, POLAR FM has good polarimetric capabilities.
  • Gamma-ray polarimetry is a new powerful tool to study the processes responsible for the emission from astrophysical sources and the environments in which this emission takes place. Few successful polarimetric measurements have however been performed thus far in the gamma-ray energy band due to the difficulties involved. POLAR is a dedicated polarimeter designed to perform high precision measurements of the polarization of the emission from gamma-ray burst in the 50-500 keV energy range. This new polarimeter is expected to detect approximately 50 gamma-ray bursts per year while performing high precision polarization measurements on approximately 10 bursts per year. The instrument was launched into lower earth orbit as part of the second Chinese space lab, the Tiangong-2, on September 15th 2016 and has been taking data successfully since being switched on one week after. The instrument uses a segmented scintillator array consisting of 1600 plastic scintillator bars, read out by 25 flat-panel multi-anode photomultipliers, to measure the Compton scattering angles of incoming photons. The small segmentation and relatively large uniform effective area allow the instrument to measure the polarization of a large number of transient events, such as gamma-ray bursts, with an unprecedented precision during its two year life-time. The final flight model underwent detailed calibration prior to launch as well as intensive space qualification tests, a summary of which will be presented in this paper. The instrument design will be discussed first followed by an overview of the on-ground tests, finally the in-orbit behavior as measured during the first weeks of the mission will be presented.
  • Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the strongest explosions in the universe which might be associated with creation of black holes. Magnetic field structure and burst dynamics may influence polarization of the emitted gamma-rays. Precise polarization detection can be an ultimate tool to unveil the true GRB mechanism. POLAR is a space-borne Compton scattering detector for precise measurements of the GRB polarization. It consists of a 40$\times$40 array of plastic scintillator bars read out by 25 multi-anode PMTs (MaPMTs). It is scheduled to be launched into space in 2016 onboard of the Chinese space laboratory TG2. We present a dedicated methodology for POLAR calibration and some calibration results based on the combined use of the laboratory radioactive sources and polarized X-ray beams from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. They include calibration of the energy response, computation of the energy conversion factor vs. high voltage as well as determination of the threshold values, crosstalk contributions and polarization modulation factors.
  • A new series of Earth occultation observations has been started in 2012 to refine the determination of the cosmic X-ray background by the INTEGRAL mission. We show here that the new detector lightcurves in the 3 to 160 keV range differ from the ones obtained in 2006. Instead of the expected modulation induced by the passage of the Earth through the field of view of the JEM-X, IBIS/ISGRI and SPI instruments, we record unrelated variability on shorter timescales. We discuss the differences obtained with the datasets of 2006 and 2012 in view of the changes in pointing direction, spacecraft orbit and solar cycle phase. We conclude that the Earth occultation signal in 2012 is likely blended by radioactive decay resulting from the activation of the spacecraft when crossing the proton radiation belt at perigee passage. The observed variability, on the other hand, results most likely from the current solar maximum. In addition to a variable particle environment from inhomogeneities of the solar wind, we also find evidence for hard X-ray auroral emission. While the former can be traced by SPI/ACS counts, the latter - by enhancing unpredictably the Earth emission - is a major disturbance for measuring the diffuse X-ray background through occultation by the Earth.
  • The hard X-ray polarimeter POLAR aims to measure the linear polarization of the 50-500 keV photons arriving from the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The position in the sky of the detected GRBs is needed to determine their level of polarization. We present here a method by which, despite of the polarimeter incapability of taking images, GRBs can be roughly localized using POLAR alone. For this purpose scalers are attached to the output of the 25 multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMs) that collect the light from the POLAR scintillator target. Each scaler measures how many GRB photons produce at least one energy deposition above 50 keV in the corresponding MAPM. Simulations show that the relative outputs of the 25 scalers depend on the GRB position. A database of very strong GRBs simulated at 10201 positions has been produced. When a GRB is detected, its location is calculated searching the minimum of the chi2 obtained in the comparison between the measured scaler pattern and the database. This GRB localization technique brings enough accuracy so that the error transmitted to the 100% modulation factor is kept below 10% for GRBs with fluence Ftot \geq 10^(-5) erg cm^(-2) . The POLAR localization capability will be useful for those cases where no other instruments are simultaneously observing the same field of view.
  • Context: In 6 years of operation, INTEGRAL/ISGRI revealed more than 500 sources. Many of these sources are variable. Taking into account that nearly half of INTEGRAL/ISGRI sources are new and many of them are still unidentified, the variability properties of the sources can serve as additional parameters that may help to classify and identify the unknown sources. Aims: In order to study the variability properties of the sources detected by INTEGRAL/ISGRI we develop a method to quantify the variability of a source. We describe here our techniques and compile a catalog of the sources that fit our criteria of variability. Methods: We use the natural time binning of INTEGRAL observations called Science Window ($\approx 2000$ seconds) and test the hypothesis that the detected sources are constant using a $\chi^2$ all-sky map in three energy bands (20-40, 40-100, 100-200 keV). We calculate an intrinsic variance of the flux in individual pixels and use it to define the fractional variability of a source. The method is sensitive to the source variability on time scales of one Science Window and higher. We concentrate only on the sources which were already reported to be detected by INTEGRAL. Results: We present a catalog of 202 sources which are found to be significantly variable. For the catalog sources we give the measure of variability and fluxes with corresponding errors in 20-40, 40-100, 100-200 keV energy bands, and we present some statistics about the population of variable sources. The description of the physical properties of the variable sources will be given in a forthcoming paper.
  • We derive the spectra of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) and of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) in the ~20-200 keV range from the data of the IBIS instrument aboard the INTEGRAL satellite obtained during the four dedicated Earth-occultation observations of early 2006. We analyse the modulation of the IBIS/ISGRI detector counts induced by the passage of the Earth through the field of view of the instrument. Unlike previous studies, we do not fix the spectral shape of the various contributions, but model instead their spatial distribution and derive for each of them the expected modulation of the detector counts. The spectra of the diffuse emission components are obtained by fitting the normalizations of the model lightcurves to the observed modulation in different energy bins. The obtained CXB spectrum is consistent with the historic HEAO-1 results and falls slightly below the spectrum derived with Swift/BAT. A 10% higher normalization of the CXB cannot be completely excluded, but it would imply an unrealistically high albedo of the Earth. The derived spectrum of the GRXE confirms the presence of a minimum around 80 keV with improved statistics and yields an estimate of ~0.6 M_Sun for the average mass of white dwarfs in the Galaxy. The analysis also provides updated normalizations for the spectra of the Earth's albedo and the cosmic-ray induced atmospheric emission.
  • Aims. We use the IBIS/ISGRI telescope on-board INTEGRAL to measure the position of the centroid of the 20-200 keV emission from the Crab region. Methods. We find that the astrometry of the IBIS telescope is affected by the temperature of the IBIS mask during the observation. After correcting for this effect, we show that the systematic errors in the astrometry of the telescope are of the order of 0.5 arcsec. In the case of the Crab nebula and several other bright sources, the very large number of photons renders the level of statistical uncertainty in the centroid smaller or comparable to this value. Results. We find that the centroid of the Crab nebula in hard X-rays (20-40 keV) is shifted by 8.0 arcsec with respect to the Crab pulsar in the direction of the X-ray centroid of the nebula. A similar shift is also found at higher energies (40-100 and 100-200 keV). We observe a trend of decreasing shift with energy, which can be explained by an increase in the pulsed fraction. To differentiate between the contribution of the pulsar and the nebula, we divide our data into an on-pulse and off-pulse sample. Surprisingly, the nebular emission (i.e., off-pulse) is located significantly away from the X-ray centroid of the nebula. Conclusions. In all 3 energy bands (20-40, 40-100, and 100-200 keV), we find that the centroid of the nebula is significantly offset from the predicted position. We interpret this shift in terms of a cut-off in the electron spectrum in the outer regions of the nebula, which is probably the origin of the observed spectral break around 100 keV. From a simple spherically-symmetric model for the nebula, we estimate that the electrons in the external regions of the torus (d ~ 0.35 pc from the pulsar) reach a maximal energy slightly below 10^14 eV.
  • We examine the energy losses of a small black hole passing through the Earth, and in particular, the excitations created in the frequency range accessible to modern acoustic detectors. The dominating contributions to the effect are due to the coherent sound radiation of the Cherenkov type and to the conversion of black hole radiation into sound waves.
  • We present the results of deep observations of the Ophiuchus cluster of galaxies with INTEGRAL in the 3-80 keV band. We analyse 3 Ms of INTEGRAL data on the Ophiuchus cluster with the IBIS/ISGRI hard X-ray imager and the JEM-X X-ray monitor. In the X-ray band using JEM-X, we show that the source is extended, and that the morphology is compatible with the results found by previous missions. Above 20 keV, we show that the size of the source is slightly larger than the PSF of the instrument, and is consistent with the soft X-ray morphology found with JEM-X and ASCA. Thanks to the constraints on the temperature provided by JEM-X, we show that the spectrum of the cluster is not well fitted by a single-temperature thermal Bremsstrahlung model, and that another spectral component is needed to explain the high energy data. We detect the high energy tail with a higher detection significance (6.4 sigma) than the BeppoSAX claim (2 sigma). Because of the imaging capabilities of JEM-X and ISGRI, we are able to exclude the possibility that the excess emission comes from very hot regions or absorbed AGN, which proves that the excess emission is indeed of non-thermal origin. Using the available radio data together with the non-thermal hard X-ray flux, we estimate a magnetic field B ~ 0.1-0.2 mu G.
  • We present the results of a deep (1.1 Ms) observation of the Coma cluster of galaxies in the 18-30 keV band with the IBIS/ISGRI imager on board the INTEGRAL satellite. We show that the source extension in the North-East to South-West (SW) direction ($\sim 17'$) significantly exceeds the size of the point spread function of ISGRI, and that the centroid of the image of the source in the 18-30 keV band is displaced in the SW direction compared to the centroid in the 1-10 keV band. To test the nature of the SW extension we fit the data assuming different models of source morphology. The best fit is achieved with a diffuse source of elliptical shape, although an acceptable fit can be achieved assuming an additional point source SW of the cluster core. In the case of an elliptical source, the direction of extension of the source coincides with the direction toward the subcluster falling onto the Coma cluster. If the SW excess is due to the presence of a point source with a hard spectrum, we show that there is no obvious X-ray counterpart for this additional source, and that the closest X-ray source is the quasar EXO 1256+281, which is located $6.1'$ from the centroid of the excess. Finally, we show that the hard X-ray emission coincides with the 1.4 GHz radio emission, which suggests that the hard X-ray emission comes from the same population of electrons that is responsible for radio haloes through synchrotron emission.
  • The energy losses of a small black hole passing through the Earth are examined. In particular, we investigate the excitations in the frequency range accessible to modern acoustic detectors. The main contribution to the effect is given by the coherent sound radiation of the Cherenkov type.
  • We explore the morphology of hard (18-30 keV) X-ray emission from the Coma cluster of galaxies. We analyze a deep (1.1 Ms) observation of the Coma cluster with the ISGRI imager on board the \emph{INTEGRAL} satellite. We show that the source extension in the North-East to South-West (SW) direction ($\sim 17'$) significantly exceeds the size of the point spread function of ISGRI, and that the centroid of the image of the source in the 18-30 keV band is displaced in the SW direction compared to the centroid in the 1-10 keV band. To test the nature of the SW extension we fit the data assuming different models of source morphology. The best fit is achieved with a diffuse source of elliptical shape, although an acceptable fit can be achieved assuming an additional point source SW of the cluster core. In the case of an elliptical source, the direction of extension of the source coincides with the direction toward the subcluster falling onto the Coma cluster. If the SW excess is due to the presence of a point source with a hard spectrum, we show that there is no obvious X-ray counterpart for this additional source, and that the closest X-ray source is the quasar EXO 1256+281, which is located $6.1'$ from the centroid of the excess. The observed morphology of the hard X-ray emission clarifies the nature of the hard X-ray "excess" emission from the Coma cluster, which is due to the presence of an extended hard X-ray source SW of the cluster core.
  • Parameters from the literature, such as positions, photoelectric absorption (nH), spin and orbital periods, and distances or redshifts, were collected for all ~500 sources detected by INTEGRAL-ISGRI so far. We investigate where new and previously-known sources detected by ISGRI fit in the parameter space of high-energy objects, and we use the parameters to test correlations expected from theoretical predictions. For example, the influence of the local absorbing matter on periodic modulations is studied for Galactic High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) with OB supergiant and Be companions. We examine the spatial distribution of different types of sources in the Milky Way using various projections of the Galactic plane, in order to highlight signatures of stellar evolution and to speculate on the origin of the group of sources whose classifications are still uncertain. ISGRI has detected similar numbers of X-ray Binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The former group contains new members of the class of HMXBs with supergiant stellar companions. Thanks to these additional systems, we are able to show that HMXBs are generally segregated in plots of intrinsic nH versus the orbital period of the system and versus the spin period of the pulsar, based on whether the companion is a Be or an OB supergiant star. We also find a tentative but expected anti-correlation between nH and the orbital period, and a possible and unexpected correlation between the nH and the spin period. While only a handful of new Low-Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) have been discovered, there are many sources that remain unclassified and they appear to follow a spatial distribution typical of Galactic sources (especially LMXBs) rather than extragalactic sources.
  • We study the spectrum of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) in energy range $\sim$5-100 keV. Early in 2006 the INTEGRAL observatory performed a series of four 30ksec observations with the Earth disk crossing the field of view of the instruments. The modulation of the aperture flux due to occultation of extragalactic objects by the Earth disk was used to obtain the spectrum of the Cosmic X-ray Background(CXB). Various sources of contamination were evaluated, including compact sources, Galactic Ridge emission, CXB reflection by the Earth atmosphere, cosmic ray induced emission by the Earth atmosphere and the Earth auroral emission. The spectrum of the cosmic X-ray background in the energy band 5-100 keV is obtained. The shape of the spectrum is consistent with that obtained previously by the HEAO-1 observatory, while the normalization is $\sim$10% higher. This difference in normalization can (at least partly) be traced to the different assumptions on the absolute flux from the Crab Nebulae. The increase relative to the earlier adopted value of the absolute flux of the CXB near the energy of maximum luminosity (20-50 keV) has direct implications for the energy release of supermassive black holes in the Universe and their growth at the epoch of the CXB origin.
  • In this paper we report on the third soft gamma-ray source catalog obtained with the IBIS/ISGRI gamma-ray imager on board the INTEGRAL satellite. The scientific dataset is based on more than 40 Ms of high quality observations performed during the first three and a half years of Core Program and public IBIS/ISGRI observations. Compared to previous IBIS/ISGRI surveys, this catalog includes a substantially increased coverage of extragalactic fields, and comprises more than 400 high-energy sources detected in the energy range 17-100 keV, including both transients and faint persistent objects which can only be revealed with longer exposure times.
  • If primordial black holes (PBH) saturate the present upper limit on the dark matter density in our Solar system and if their radiation spectrum is discrete, the sensitivity of modern detectors is close to that necessary for detecting this radiation. This conclusion is not in conflict with the upper limits on the PBH evaporation rate.
  • The decline of the high mass X-ray transient V0332+53 during the Dec. 2004 to Feb. 2005 outburst is analysed from the data recorded by INTEGRAL. The flux is shown to decrease exponentially until 2005 Feb. 10, with a decay time scale of \~30 days above 20 keV and ~20 days at lower energies, and to decrease linearly thereafter. The energy spectrum is well modelled throughout the decay by a power law with a folding energy of ~7.5 keV, and with two cyclotron absorption features. The folding energy does not vary significantly over the decay, but the spectrum becomes harder with time. Most importantly, we show that the parameters describing the fundamental cyclotron line around 27 keV do vary with time: its energy and depth increase (by about 17% for the energy in ~6 weeks), while its width decreases. These changes of the cyclotron line parameters are interpreted as resulting from a change in the extent of the cyclotron scattering region. Two quasi-periodic oscillations are also observed at various times during the observations, one at 0.05 Hz and another one near the pulsation frequency around 0.23 Hz.
  • We present the spectral and temporal analysis of the 2004/2005 outburst of the transient X-ray pulsar V0332+53 as observed with Integral. After the discovery of the third cyclotron line in phase averaged spectra (Kreykenbohm et al 2005, Pottschmidt et al 2005), detailed pulse phase spectroscopy revealed remarkably little variability of the cyclotron lines through the 4.4s X-ray pulse (Pottschmidt et al 2005). During the decline of the outburst, the flux was observed to decay exponentially until 2005 Feb 10 and linearly thereafter. The spectrum was found to become harder with time, while the folding energy remained constant. The energy of the fundamental cyclotron line increased with time from 26.5kev in the RXTE observation up to 29.5kev in the last Integral one indicating that the emission region is moving closer to the surface of the neutron star. For a detailed analysis, see Mowlavi et al (2005).
  • The design and the simulated performances of a compact detector dedicated to the measurement of GRB photon polarization is presented. Such a detector would permit to answer the question ``are most of the GRB strongly polarized?'' in a mission of one year in space.
  • We present the analysis of a 100ksec Integral(3-100kev) observation of the transient X-ray pulsar V0332+53 inoutburst. The source is pulsating at P=4.3751+/-0.0002s with a clear double pulse from 6 kev to 60 kev. The average flux was ~550mCrab between 20 kev and 60 kev. We modeled the broad band continuum from 5 kev to 100 kev with a power-law modified by an exponential cut off. We observe three cyclotron lines: the fundamental line at 24.9+/-0.1 kev, the first harmonic at 50.5+/-0.1 kev as well as the second harmonic at71.7+/-0.8 kev, thus confirming the discovery of the harmonic lines by Coburn et al. (2005) in RXTE data.
  • We report the discovery of a high-energy transient with the IBIS/ISGRI detector on board the INTEGRAL observatory. The source, namely IGR J00291+5934, was first detected on 2nd December 2004 in the routine monitoring of the IBIS/ISGRI 20--60 keV images. The observations were conducted during Galactic Plane Scans, which are a key part of the INTEGRAL Core Programme observations. After verifying the basic source behaviour, the discovery was announced on 3rd December. The transient shows a hard Comptonised spectrum, with peak energy release at about 20 keV and a total luminosity of ~ 0.9E36 erg/s in the 5--100 keV range, assuming a distance of 3 kpc. Following the INTEGRAL announcement of the discovery of IGR J00291+5934, a number of observations were made by other instruments. We summarise the results of those observations and, together with the INTEGRAL data, identifiy IGR J00291+5934 as the 6th member of a class of accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars.