• We describe the afterglows of long GRBs within the context of a binary-driven hypernova (BdHN). In this paradigm afterglows originate from the interaction between a newly born neutron star (vNS), created by an Ic supernova (SN), and a mildly relativistic ejecta of a hypernova (HN). Such a HN in turn results from the impact of the GRB on the original SN Ic. The mildly relativistic expansion velocity of the afterglow ($\Gamma$~3) is determined, using our model indipendent approach, from the thermal emission between 196s and 461s. The observed power-law afterglow in the optical and X-ray bands is shown to arise from the synchrotron emission of relativistic electrons in the expanding magnetized HN ejecta. Two components contribute to the injected energy: the kinetic energy of the mildly relativistic expanding HN and the rotational energy of the fast rotating highly magnetized vNS. As an example we reproduce the observed afterglow of GRB130427A [...]. Initially, the emission is dominated by the loss of kinetic energy of the HN component. After $10^5$s the emission is dominated by the loss of rotational energy of the vNS, for which we adopt an initial rotation period of 2ms and a dipole/quadrupole magnetic field of $\lesssim7x10^{12}$G/~$10^{14}$G. This approach opens new views on the roles of the GRB interaction with the SN ejecta, on the mildly relativistic kinetic energy of the HN and on the pulsar-like phenomena of the vNS. This scenario differs from the current ultra-relativistic treatments of the afterglows and is consistent with the current observations of the mildly relativistic expansions determined in a model independent approach in the Hard X-ray flares (HXFs), extended thermal emission (ETE), soft X-ray flares (SXFs) and flare-plateau-afterglow (FPA) phase in the BdHN, as well as of the thermal emission between 196s and 461s first presented in this paper.
  • We report on a detailed investigation of the $\gamma$-ray emission from 26 non-blazar AGNs based on the Fermi LAT data accumulated for 7 years. The photon index of non-blazar AGNs changes in the range of 1.84-2.86 and the flux varies from a few times $10^{-9} photon\: cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ to $10^{-7} photon\: cm^{-2}s^{-1}$. Over long time periods, power-law provides an adequate description of the $\gamma$-ray spectra of almost all sources. Significant curvature is observed in the $\gamma$-ray spectra of NGC 1275, NGC 6251, SBS 0846+513 and PMN J0948+0022 and their spectra are better described by log-parabola or power-law with exponential cut-off models. The $\gamma$-ray spectra of PKS 0625-25 and 3C 380 show a possible deviation from a simple power-law shape, indicating a spectral cutoff around the observed photon energy of $E_{cut}=131.2\pm88.04$ GeV and $E_{cut}=55.57\pm50.74$ GeV, respectively. Our analysis confirms the previous finding of an unusual spectral turnover in the $\gamma$-ray spectrum of Cen A: the photon index changes from $2.75\pm0.02$ to $2.31\pm0.1$ at $2.35\pm0.08$ GeV. In the $\Gamma-L_{\gamma}$ plane, the luminosity of non-blazar AGNs is spread in the range of $10^{41}-10^{47}\: erg\: s^{-1}$, where the lowest luminosity have FRI radio galaxies (but typically appear with a harder photon index) and the highest- SSRQs/NLSY1s (with softer photon indexes). We confirm the previously reported short-timescale flux variability of NGC 1275 and 3C 120. The $\gamma$-ray emission from NLSY1s, 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513 and PMN J0948+0022, is variable, showing flares in short scales sometimes accompanied by a moderate hardening of their spectra (e.g., on MJD 56146.8 the $\gamma$-ray photon index of SBS 0846+513 was $1.73\pm0.14$). 3C 111, Cen A core, 3C 207, 3C 275.1, 3C 380, 4C+39.23B, PKS 1502+036 and PKS 2004-447 show a long-timescale flux variability in the $\gamma$-ray band.
  • Context. Important information on the evolution of the jet can be obtained by comparing the physical state of the plasma at its propagation through the broad-line region (where the jet is most likely formed) into the intergalactic medium, where it starts to significantly decelerate. Aims. We compare the constraints on the physical parameters in the innermost ($\leq$ pc) and outer ($\geq$ kpc) regions of the 3C 120 jet by means of a detailed multiwavelength analysis and theoretical modeling of their broadband spectra. Methods.The data collected by Fermi LAT, Swift and Chandra are analyzed together and the spectral energy distributions are modeled using a leptonic synchrotron and inverse Compton model, taking into account the seed photons originating inside and outside of the jet. The model parameters are estimated using the MCMC method. Results. The $\gamma$-ray flux from the inner jet of 3C 120 was characterized by rapid variation from MJD 56900 to MJD 57300. Two strong flares were observed on April 24, 2015 when, within 19.0 minutes and 3.15 hours the flux was as high as $(7.46\pm1.56)\times10^{-6}photon\:cm^{-2}\:s^{-1}$ and $(4.71\pm0.92)\times10^{-6}photon\:cm^{-2}\:s^{-1}$ respectively. The broadband emission in the quiet and flaring states can be described as SSC emission while IC scattering of dusty torus photons cannot be excluded for the flaring states. The X-ray emission from the knots can be well reproduced by IC scattering of CMB photons only if the jet is highly relativistic (since even when $\delta=10$ still $U_{\rm e}/U_B\geq80$). These extreme requirements can be somewhat softened assuming the X-rays are from the synchrotron emission of a second population of very-high-energy electrons. Conclusions. We found that the jet power estimated at two scales is consistent, suggesting that the jet does not suffer severe dissipation, it simply becomes radiatively inefficient.
  • We report on a detailed analysis of the $\gamma$-ray light curve of NGC 1275 using the Fermi large area telescope data accumulated in 2008-2017. Major $\gamma$-ray flares were observed in October 2015 and December 2016/January 2017 when the source reached a daily peak flux of $(2.21\pm0.26)\times10^{-6}\:{\rm photon\:cm^{-2}\:s^{-1}}$, achieving a flux of $(3.48\pm0.87)\times10^{-6}\:{\rm photon\:cm^{-2}\:s^{-1}}$ within 3 hours, which corresponds to an apparent isotropic $\gamma$-ray luminosity of $\simeq3.84\times10^{45}\:{\rm erg\:s^{-1}}$. The most rapid flare had e-folding time as short as $1.21\pm0.22$ hours which had never been previously observed for any radio galaxy in $\gamma$-ray band. Also $\gamma$-ray spectral changes were observed during these flares: in the flux versus photon index plane the spectral evolution follows correspondingly a counter clockwise and a clockwise loop inferred from the light curve generated by an adaptive binning method. On December 30, 2016 and January 01, 2017 the X-ray photon index softened ($\Gamma_{\rm X}\simeq 1.75-1.77$) and the flux increased nearly $\sim3$ times as compared with the quiet state. The observed hour-scale variability suggests a very compact emission region ($R_\gamma\leq5.22\times10^{14}\:(\delta/4)\:{\rm cm}$) implying that the observed emission is most likely produced in the subparsec-scale jet if the entire jet width is responsible for the emission. During the active periods the $\gamma$-ray photon index hardened, shifting the peak of the high energy spectral component to $>{\rm GeV}$, making it difficult to explain the observed X-ray and $\gamma$-ray data in the standard one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model.
  • We present the $\gamma$-ray observations of the flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1441+25 (z=0.939), using the {\it Fermi} large Area Telescope data accumulated during January - December 2015. A $\gamma$-ray flare was observed in January 24, when the flux increased up to $(2.22\pm0.38)\times10^{-6}\;{\rm photon\:cm^{-2}\:s^{-1}}$ with the flux-doubling time scale being as short as $\sim1.44$ days. The spectral analysis shows that from April 13 to April 28, 2015 the MeV-to-GeV photon index has hardened and changes in the range of $\Gamma=(1.73-1.79)$ for most of the time. The hardest photon index of $\Gamma=1.54\pm0.16$ has been observed on MJD 57131.46 with $11.8\sigma$ which is not common for flat-spectrum radio quasars. For the same period the \gray spectrum shows a possible deviation from a simple power-law shape, indicating a spectral cutoff at $E_{\rm cut}=17.7\pm8.9$ GeV. The spectral energy distributions during quiescent and flaring states are modeled using one-zone leptonic models that include the synchrotron, synchrotron self Compton and external inverse Compton processes; the model parameters are estimated using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. The emission in the flaring states can be modeled assuming that either the bulk Lorentz factor or the magnetic field has increased. The modeling shows that there is a hint of hardening of the low-energy index ($\sim1.98$) of the underlying non-thermal distribution of electrons responsible for the emission in April 2015. Such hardening agrees with the $\gamma$-ray data, which pointed out a significant $\gamma$-ray photon index hardening on April 13 to 28, 2015.
  • The recent results from ground based $\gamma$-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic $\gamma$-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the $\gamma$-rays and $\nu$ -s are produced from decays of neutral and charged pions, the flux of TeV $\gamma$-rays can be used to estimate the upper limit of $\nu$ flux and vice versa; the detectability of $\nu$ flux implies a minimum flux of the accompanying $\gamma$-rays (assuming the internal and the external absorption of $\gamma$-rays is negligible). Using this minimum flux, it is possible to find the sources which can be detected with cubic-kilometer telescopes. I will discuss the possibility to detect HE neutrinos from powerful galactic accelerators, such as Supernova Remnants (SNRs) and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) and show that likely only RX J1713.7-3946 , RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela X can be detected by current generation of instruments (IceCube and Km3Net). It will be shown also, that galactic binary systems could be promising sources of HE $\nu$ -s. In particular, $\nu$-s and $\gamma$-rays from Cygnus X-3 will be discussed during recent gamma-ray activity, showing that in the future such kind of activities could produce detectable flux of HE $\nu$-s
  • We report the analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope data from five years of observations of the broad line radio galaxy 3C 120. The accumulation of larger data set results in the detection of high-energy $\gamma$-rays up to 10 GeV, with a detection significance of about $8.7\sigma$. A power-law spectrum with a photon index of $2.72\pm0.1$ and integrated flux of $F_{\gamma}=(2.35\pm0.5)\times10^{-8}\:\mathrm{photon\:cm}^{-2}s^{-1}$ above 100 MeV well describe the data averaged over five year observations. The variability analysis of the light curve with 180-, and 365- day bins reveals flux increase (nearly twice from its average level) during the last year of observation. This variability on month timescales indicates the compactness of the emitting region. The $\gamma$-ray spectrum can be described as synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission from the electron population producing the radio-to-X-ray emission in the jet. The required electron energy density exceeds the one of magnetic field only by a factor of 2 meaning no significant deviation from equipartition.
  • Cygnus X-3 (Cyg X-3) is a remarkable Galactic microquasar (X-ray binary) emitting from radio to $\gamma$-ray energies. In this paper, we consider hadronic model of emission of $\gamma$-rays above 100 MeV and their implications. We focus here on the joint $\gamma$-ray and neutrino production resulting from proton-proton interactions within the binary system. We find that the required proton injection kinetic power, necessary to explain the $\gamma$-ray flux observed by AGILE and Fermi-LAT, is $L_p \sim 10^{38}\:\rm{erg\:s^{-1}}$, a value in agreement with the average bolometric luminosity of the hypersoft state (when Cygnus X-3 was repeatedly observed to produce transient $\gamma$-ray activity). If we assume an increase of the wind density at the superior conjunction, the asymmetric production of $\gamma$-rays along the orbit can reproduce the observed modulation. According to observational constraints and our modelling, a maximal flux of high-energy neutrinos would be produced for an initial proton distribution with a power-law index $\alpha=2.4$. The predicted neutrino flux is almost two orders of magnitude less than the 2-month IceCube sensitivity at $\sim$1 TeV. If the protons are accelerated up to PeV energies, the predicted neutrino flux for a prolonged "soft X-ray state" would be a factor of about 3 lower than the 1-year IceCube sensitivity at $\sim$10 TeV. This study shows that, for a prolonged soft state (as observed in 2006) possibly related with $\gamma$-ray activity and a hard distribution of injected protons, Cygnus X-3 might be close to being detectable by cubic-kilometer neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.
  • We report on an analysis of \fermi data from four year of observations of the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A). The increased photon statistics results in a detection of high-energy ($>\:100$ MeV) $\gamma$-rays up to 50 GeV from the core of Cen A, with a detection significance of about 44$\sigma$. The average gamma-ray spectrum of the core reveals evidence for a possible deviation from a simple power-law. A likelihood analysis with a broken power-law model shows that the photon index becomes harder above $E_b \simeq 4$ GeV, changing from $\Gamma_1=2.74\pm0.03$ below to $\Gamma_2=2.09\pm0.20$ above. This hardening could be caused by the contribution of an additional high-energy component beyond the common synchrotron-self Compton jet emission. A variability analysis of the light curve with 15-, 30-, and 60-day bins does not provide evidence for variability for any of the components. Indications for a possible variability of the observed flux are found on 45-day time scale, but the statistics do not allow us to make a definite conclusion in this regards. We compare our results with the spectrum reported by H.E.S.S. in the TeV energy range and discuss possible origins for the hardening observed.
  • In the framework of a basic semiclassical time-dependent nonlinear two-state problem, we study the weak coupling limit of the nonlinear Landau-Zener transition at coherent photo- and magneto-association of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. Using an exact third-order nonlinear differential equation for the molecular state probability, we develop a variational approach which enables us to construct an accurate analytic approximation describing time dynamics of the coupled atom-molecular system for the case of weak coupling. The approximation is written in terms of the solution to an auxiliary linear Landau-Zener problem with some effective Landau-Zener parameter. The dependence of this effective parameter on the input Landau-Zener parameter is found to be unexpected: as the generic Landau-Zener parameter increases, the effective Landau-Zener parameter first monotonically increases (starting from zero), reaches its maximal value and then monotonically decreases again reaching zero at some point. The constructed approximation quantitatively well describes many characteristics of the time dynamics of the system, in particular, it provides a highly accurate formula for the final transition probability to the molecular state. The present result for the final transition probability improves the accuracy of the previous approximation by Ishkhanyan et al. [Phys. Rev. A 69, 043612 (2004); J. Phys. A 38, 3505 (2005)] by order of magnitude.