• We investigate the stellar mass and baryonic mass Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs) of massive star-forming disk galaxies at redshift z~2.3 and z~0.9 as part of the KMOS^3D integral field spectroscopy survey. Our spatially resolved data allow reliable modelling of individual galaxies, including the effect of pressure support on the inferred gravitational potential. At fixed circular velocity, we find higher baryonic masses and similar stellar masses at z~2.3 as compared to z~0.9. Together with the decreasing gas-to-stellar mass ratios with decreasing redshift, this implies that the contribution of dark matter to the dynamical mass at the galaxy scale increases towards lower redshift. A comparison to local relations reveals a negative evolution of the stellar and baryonic TFR zero-points from z=0 to z~0.9, no evolution of the stellar TFR zero-point from z~0.9 to z~2.3, and a positive evolution of the baryonic TFR zero-point from z~0.9 to z~2.3. We discuss a toy model of disk galaxy evolution to explain the observed, non-monotonic TFR evolution, taking into account the empirically motivated redshift dependencies of galactic gas fractions, and of the relative amount of baryons to dark matter on galaxy and halo scales.
  • We exploit the deep resolved Halpha kinematic data from the KMOS^3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys to examine the largely unexplored outer disk kinematics of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) out to the peak of cosmic star formation. Our sample contains 101 SFGs representative of the more massive (9.3 < log(M*/Msun) < 11.5) main sequence population at 0.6<z<2.6. Through a novel stacking approach we are able to constrain a representative rotation curve extending out to ~4 effective radii. This average rotation curve exhibits a significant drop in rotation velocity beyond the turnover, with a slope of Delta(V)/Delta(R) = $-0.26^{+0.10}_{-0.09}$ in units of normalized coordinates V/V_max and R/R_turn. This result confirms that the fall-off seen previously in some individual galaxies is a common feature of our sample of high-z disks. We show that this outer fall-off strikingly deviates from the flat or mildly rising rotation curves of local spiral galaxies of similar masses. We furthermore compare our data with models including baryons and dark matter demonstrating that the falling stacked rotation curve can be explained by a high mass fraction of baryons relative to the total dark matter halo (m_d>~0.05) in combination with a sizeable level of pressure support in the outer disk. These findings are in agreement with recent studies demonstrating that star-forming disks at high redshift are strongly baryon dominated within the disk scale, and furthermore suggest that pressure gradients caused by large turbulent gas motions are present even in their outer disks. We demonstrate that these results are largely independent of our model assumptions such as the presence of a central stellar bulge, the effect of adiabatic contraction at fixed m_d, and variations in the concentration parameter.
  • In cold dark matter cosmology, the baryonic components of galaxies are thought to be mixed with and embedded in non-baryonic and non-relativistic dark matter, which dominates the total mass of the galaxy and its dark matter halo. In the local Universe, the mass of dark matter within a galactic disk increases with disk radius, becoming appreciable and then dominant in the outer, baryonic regions of the disks of star-forming galaxies. This results in rotation velocities of the visible matter within the disk that are constant or increasing with disk radius. Comparison between the dynamical mass and the sum of stellar and cold gas mass at the peak epoch of galaxy formation, inferred from ancillary data, suggest high baryon factions in the inner, star-forming regions of the disks. Although this implied baryon fraction may be larger than in the local Universe, the systematic uncertainties (stellar initial mass function, calibration of gas masses) render such comparisons inconclusive in terms of the mass of dark matter. Here we report rotation curves for the outer disks of six massive star-forming galaxies, and find that the rotation velocities are not constant, but decrease with radius. We propose that this trend arises because of two main factors: first, a large fraction of the massive, high-redshift galaxy population was strongly baryon dominated, with dark matter playing a smaller part than in the local Universe; and second, the large velocity dispersion in high-redshift disks introduces a substantial pressure term that leads to a decrease in rotation velocity with increasing radius. The effect of both factors appears to increase with redshift. Qualitatively, the observations suggest that baryons in the early Universe efficiently condensed at the centres of dark matter halos when gas fractions were high, and dark matter was less concentrated. [Abridged]
  • We use Herschel 70 to 160um images to study the size of the far-infrared emitting region in about 400 local galaxies and quasar (QSO) hosts. The sample includes normal `main-sequence' star-forming galaxies, as well as infrared luminous galaxies and Palomar-Green QSOs, with different levels and structures of star formation. Assuming Gaussian spatial distribution of the far-infrared (FIR) emission, the excellent stability of the Herschel point spread function (PSF) enables us to measure sizes well below the PSF width, by subtracting widths in quadrature. We derive scalings of FIR size and surface brightness of local galaxies with FIR luminosity, with distance from the star-forming main-sequence, and with FIR color. Luminosities L_FIR ~ 10^11 L_Sun can be reached with a variety of structures spanning 2 dex in size. Ultraluminous L_FIR >~ 10^12 L_Sun galaxies far above the main-sequence inevitably have small Re_70um ~ 0.5 kpc FIR emitting regions with large surface brightness, and can be close to optically thick in the FIR on average over these regions. Compared to these local relations, first ALMA sizes for the dust emission regions in high redshift galaxies, measured at somewhat longer rest wavelengths, suggest larger sizes at the same IR luminosity. We report a remarkably tight relation with 0.15 dex scatter between FIR surface brightness and the ratio of [CII] 158um emission and FIR emission -- the so-called [CII]-deficit is more tightly linked to surface brightness than to FIR luminosity or FIR color. Among 33 z <~ 0.1 PG QSOs with typical L_FIR/L_Bol,AGN ~ 0.1, 19 have a measured 70um half light radius, with median Re_70um = 1.1kpc. This is consistent with the FIR size for galaxies with similar L_FIR but lacking a QSO, in accordance with a scenario where the rest FIR emission of these types of QSOs is, in most cases, due to host star formation.
  • We analyze the angular momenta of massive star forming galaxies (SFGs) at the peak of the cosmic star formation epoch (z~0.8-2.6). Our sample of ~360 log(M*/Msun) ~ 9.3-11.8 SFGs is mainly based on the KMOS3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys of H$\alpha$ kinematics, and collectively provides a representative subset of the massive star forming population. The inferred halo scale angular momentum distribution is broadly consistent with that theoretically predicted for their dark matter halos, in terms of mean spin parameter <$\lambda$> ~ 0.037 and its dispersion ($\sigma_{log(\lambda)}$~0.2). Spin parameters correlate with the disk radial scale, and with their stellar surface density, but do not depend significantly on halo mass, stellar mass, or redshift. Our data thus support the long-standing assumption that on average, even at high redshifts, the specific angular momentum of disk galaxies reflects that of their dark matter halos (j_d = j_DM). The lack of correlation between $\lambda$ x (j_d/j_DM) and the nuclear stellar density $\Sigma_{*}$(1kpc) favors a scenario where disk-internal angular momentum redistribution leads to "compaction" inside massive high-redshift disks. For our sample, the inferred average stellar-to-dark matter mass ratio is ~2%, consistent with abundance matching results. Including the molecular gas, the total baryonic disk-to-dark matter mass ratio is ~5% for halos near $10^{12}$ Msun, which corresponds to 31% of the cosmologically available baryons, implying that high-redshift disks are strongly baryon dominated.
  • We present the KMOS^3D survey, a new integral field survey of over 600 galaxies at 0.7<z<2.7 using KMOS at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The KMOS^3D survey utilizes synergies with multi-wavelength ground and space-based surveys to trace the evolution of spatially-resolved kinematics and star formation from a homogeneous sample over 5 Gyrs of cosmic history. Targets, drawn from a mass-selected parent sample from the 3D-HST survey, cover the star formation-stellar mass ($M_*$) and rest-frame $(U-V)-M_*$ planes uniformly. We describe the selection of targets, the observations, and the data reduction. In the first year of data we detect Halpha emission in 191 $M_*=3\times10^{9}-7\times10^{11}$ Msun galaxies at z=0.7-1.1 and z=1.9-2.7. In the current sample 83% of the resolved galaxies are rotation-dominated, determined from a continuous velocity gradient and $v_{rot}/\sigma>1$, implying that the star-forming 'main sequence' (MS) is primarily composed of rotating galaxies at both redshift regimes. When considering additional stricter criteria, the Halpha kinematic maps indicate at least ~70% of the resolved galaxies are disk-like systems. Our high-quality KMOS data confirm the elevated velocity dispersions reported in previous IFS studies at z>0.7. For rotation-dominated disks, the average intrinsic velocity dispersion decreases by a factor of two from 50 km/s at z~2.3 to 25 km/s at z~0.9 while the rotational velocities at the two redshifts are comparable. Combined with existing results spanning z~0-3, disk velocity dispersions follow an approximate (1+z) evolution that is consistent with the dependence of velocity dispersion on gas fractions predicted by marginally-stable disk theory.
  • We combine molecular gas masses inferred from CO emission in 500 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 3, from the IRAM-COLDGASS, PHIBSS1/2 and other surveys, with gas masses derived from Herschel far-IR dust measurements in 512 galaxy stacks over the same stellar mass/redshift range. We constrain the scaling relations of molecular gas depletion time scale (tdepl) and gas to stellar mass ratio (Mmolgas/M*) of SFGs near the star formation main-sequence with redshift, specific star formation rate (sSFR) and stellar mass (M*). The CO- and dust-based scaling relations agree remarkably well. This suggests that the CO-H2 mass conversion factor varies little within 0.6dex of the main sequence (sSFR(ms,z,M*)), and less than 0.3dex throughout this redshift range. This study builds on and strengthens the results of earlier work. We find that tdepl scales as (1+z)^-0.3 *(sSFR/sSFR(ms,z,M*))^-0.5, with little dependence on M*. The resulting steep redshift dependence of Mmolgas/M* ~(1+z)^3 mirrors that of the sSFR and probably reflects the gas supply rate. The decreasing gas fractions at high M* are driven by the flattening of the SFR-M* relation. Throughout the redshift range probed a larger sSFR at constant M* is due to a combination of an increasing gas fraction and a decreasing depletion time scale. As a result galaxy integrated samples of the Mmolgas-SFR rate relation exhibit a super-linear slope, which increases with the range of sSFR. With these new relations it is now possible to determine Mmolgas with an accuracy of 0.1dex in relative terms, and 0.2dex including systematic uncertainties.
  • We present PHIBSS, the IRAM Plateau de Bure high-z blue sequence CO 3-2 survey of the molecular gas properties in normal star forming galaxies (SFGs) near the cosmic star formation peak. PHIBSS provides 52 CO detections in two redshift slices at z~1.2 and 2.2, with log(M*(M_solar))>10.4 and log(SFR(M_solar/yr))>1.5. Including a correction for the incomplete coverage of the M*-SFR plane, we infer average gas fractions of ~0.33 at z~1.2 and ~0.47 at z~2.2. Gas fractions drop with stellar mass, in agreement with cosmological simulations including strong star formation feedback. Most of the z~1-3 SFGs are rotationally supported turbulent disks. The sizes of CO and UV/optical emission are comparable. The molecular gas - star formation relation for the z=1-3 SFGs is near-linear, with a ~0.7 Gyrs gas depletion timescale; changes in depletion time are only a secondary effect. Since this timescale is much less than the Hubble time in all SFGs between z~0 and 2, fresh gas must be supplied with a fairly high duty cycle over several billion years. At given z and M*, gas fractions correlate strongly with the specific star formation rate. The variation of specific star formation rate between z~0 and 3 is mainly controlled by the fraction of baryonic mass that resides in cold gas.
  • We study a sample of 61 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) selected from ground-based surveys, with known spectroscopic redshifts and observed with Herschel as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) key programmes. We use the broad far-infrared wavelength coverage (100-600um) provided by the combination of PACS and SPIRE observations. Using a power-law temperature distribution model to derive infrared luminosities and dust temperatures, we measure a dust emissivity spectral index for SMGs of beta=2.0+/-0.2. Our results unveil the diversity of the SMG population. Some SMGs exhibit extreme infrared luminosities of ~10^13 Lsun and relatively warm dust components, while others are fainter (~10^12 Lsun) and are biased towards cold dust temperatures. The extreme infrared luminosities of some SMGs (LIR>10^12.7 Lsun, 26/61 systems) imply SFRs of >500Msun yr^-1. Such high SFRs are difficult to reconcile with a secular mode of star formation, and may instead correspond to a merger-driven stage in the evolution of these galaxies. Another observational argument in favour of this scenario is the presence of dust temperatures warmer than that of SMGs of lower luminosities (~40K as opposed to ~25K), consistent with observations of local ULIRGs triggered by major mergers and with results from hydrodynamic simulations of major mergers combined with radiative transfer calculations. Luminous SMGs are also offset from normal star-forming galaxies in the stellar mass-SFR plane, suggesting that they are undergoing starburst events with short duty cycles, compatible with the major merger scenario. On the other hand, a significant fraction of the low infrared luminosity SMGs have cold dust temperatures, are located close to the main sequence of star formation, and thus might be evolving through a secular mode of star formation. [abridged]
  • Galaxy dynamical masses are important physical quantities to constrain galaxy evolutionary models, especially at high redshifts. However, at z~2 the limited signal to noise ratio and spatial resolution of the data usually do not allow spatially resolved kinematical modeling and very often only virial masses can be estimated from line widths. But even such estimates require a good knowledge of galaxy size, which may be smaller than the spatial resolution. Spectroastrometry is a technique which combines spatial and spectral resolution to probe spatial scales significantly smaller than the spatial resolution of the observations. Here we apply it to the case of high-z galaxies and present a method based on spectroastrometry to estimate dynamical masses of high z galaxies, which overcomes the problem of size determination with poor spatial resolution. We construct and calibrate a "spectroastrometric" virial mass estimator, modifying the "classical" virial mass formula. We apply our method to the [O III] or H{\alpha} emission line detected in z~2-3 galaxies from AMAZE, LSD and SINS samples and we compare the spectroastrometric estimator with dynamical mass values resulting from full spatially resolved kinematical modeling. The spectroastrometric estimator is found to be a good approximation of dynamical masses, presenting a linear relation with a residual dispersion of only 0.15 dex. This is a big improvement compared to the "classical" virial mass estimator which has a non linear relation and much larger dispersion (0.47 dex) compared to dynamical masses. By applying our calibrated estimator to 16 galaxies from the AMAZE and LSD samples, we obtain masses in the ~10^7-10^10 M\odot range extending the mass range attainable with dynamical modeling.
  • The kinematics of distant galaxies, from z=0.1 to z>2, play a key role in our understanding of galaxy evolution from early times to the present. One of the important parameters is the intrinsic, or local, velocity dispersion of a galaxy, which allows one to quantify the degree of non-circular motions such as pressure support. However, this is difficult to measure because the observed dispersion includes the effects of (often severe) beam smearing on the velocity gradient. Here we investigate four methods of measuring the dispersion that have been used in the literature, to assess their effectiveness at recovering the intrinsic dispersion. We discuss the biasses inherent in each method, and apply them to model disk galaxies in order to determine which methods yield meaningful quantities, and under what conditions. All the mean weighted dispersion estimators are affected by (residual) beam smearing. In contrast, the dispersion recovered by fitting a spatially and spectrally convolved disk model to the data is unbiassed by the beam smearing it is trying to compensate. Because of this, and because the bias it does exhibit depends only on the signal-to-noise, it can be considered reliable. However, at very low signal-to-noise, all methods should be used with caution.
  • Deep far-infrared photometric surveys studying galaxy evolution and the nature of the cosmic infrared background are a key strength of the Herschel mission. We describe the scientific motivation for the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) guaranteed time key program and its role in the complement of Herschel surveys, and the field selection which includes popular multiwavelength fields such as GOODS, COSMOS, Lockman Hole, ECDFS, EGS. We provide an account of the observing strategies and data reduction methods used. An overview of first science results illustrates the potential of PEP in providing calorimetric star formation rates for high redshift galaxy populations, thus testing and superseeding previous extrapolations from other wavelengths, and enabling a wide range of galaxy evolution studies.
  • We have studied the properties of giant star forming clumps in five z~2 star-forming disks with deep SINFONI AO spectroscopy at the ESO VLT. The clumps reside in disk regions where the Toomre Q-parameter is below unity, consistent with their being bound and having formed from gravitational instability. Broad H{\alpha}/[NII] line wings demonstrate that the clumps are launching sites of powerful outflows. The inferred outflow rates are comparable to or exceed the star formation rates, in one case by a factor of eight. Typical clumps may lose a fraction of their original gas by feedback in a few hundred million years, allowing them to migrate into the center. The most active clumps may lose much of their mass and disrupt in the disk. The clumps leave a modest imprint on the gas kinematics. Velocity gradients across the clumps are 10-40 km/s/kpc, similar to the galactic rotation gradients. Given beam smearing and clump sizes, these gradients may be consistent with significant rotational support in typical clumps. Extreme clumps may not be rotationally supported; either they are not virialized, or they are predominantly pressure supported. The velocity dispersion is spatially rather constant and increases only weakly with star formation surface density. The large velocity dispersions may be driven by the release of gravitational energy, either at the outer disk/accreting streams interface, and/or by the clump migration within the disk. Spatial variations in the inferred gas phase oxygen abundance are broadly consistent with inside-out growing disks, and/or with inward migration of the clumps.
  • Gravitational lensing by massive galaxy clusters allows study of the population of intrinsically faint infrared galaxies that lie below the sensitivity and confusion limits of current infrared and submillimeter telescopes. We present ultra-deep PACS 100 and 160 microns observations toward the cluster lens Abell 2218, to penetrate the Herschel confusion limit. We derive source counts down to a flux density of 1 mJy at 100 microns and 2 mJy at 160 microns, aided by strong gravitational lensing. At these levels, source densities are 20 and 10 beams/source in the two bands, approaching source density confusion at 160 microns. The slope of the counts below the turnover of the Euclidean-normalized differential curve is constrained in both bands and is consistent with most of the recent backwards evolutionary models. By integrating number counts over the flux range accessed by Abell 2218 lensing (0.94-35 mJy at 100 microns and 1.47-35 mJy at 160 microns, we retrieve a cosmic infrared background (CIB) surface brightness of ~8.0 and ~9.9 nW m^-2 sr^-1, in the respective bands. These values correspond to 55% (+/- 24%) and 77% (+/- 31%) of DIRBE direct measurements. Combining Abell 2218 results with wider/shallower fields, these figures increase to 62% (+/- 25%) and 88% (+/- 32%) CIB total fractions, resolved at 100 and 160 microns, disregarding the high uncertainties of DIRBE absolute values.
  • The star formation rate (SFR) is a key parameter in the study of galaxy evolution. The accuracy of SFR measurements at z~2 has been questioned following a disagreement between observations and theoretical models. The latter predict SFRs at this redshift that are typically a factor 4 or more lower than the measurements. We present star-formation rates based on calorimetric measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for massive 1.5<z<2.5, normal star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which do not depend on extinction corrections and/or extrapolations of spectral energy distributions. The measurements are based on observations in GOODS-N with the Photodetector Array Camera & Spectrometer (PACS) onboard Herschel, as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) project, that resolve for the first time individual SFGs at these redshifts at FIR wavelengths. We compare FIR-based SFRs to the more commonly used 24 micron and UV SFRs. We find that SFRs from 24 micron alone are higher by a factor of ~4-7.5 than the true SFRs. This overestimation depends on luminosity: gradually increasing for log L(24um)>12.2 L_sun. The SFGs and AGNs tend to exhibit the same 24 micron excess. The UV SFRs are in closer agreement with the FIR-based SFRs. Using a Calzetti UV extinction correction results in a mean excess of up to 0.3 dex and a scatter of 0.35 dex from the FIR SFRs. The previous UV SFRs are thus confirmed and the mean excess, while narrowing the gap, is insufficient to explain the discrepancy between the observed SFRs and simulation predictions.
  • Sensitive Herschel far-infrared observations can break degeneracies that were inherent to previous studies of star formation in high-z AGN hosts. Combining PACS 100 and 160um observations of the GOODS-N field with 2Msec Chandra data, we detect ~20% of X-ray AGN individually at >3sig. The host far-infrared luminosity of AGN with L2-10~10^43erg/s increases with redshift by an order of magnitude from z=0 to z~1. In contrast, there is little dependence of far-infrared luminosity on AGN luminosity, for L2-10<~10^44erg/s AGN at z>~1. We do not find a dependence of far-infrared luminosity on X-ray obscuring column, for our sample which is dominated by L2-10<10^44erg/s AGN. In conjunction with properties of local and luminous high-z AGN, we interpret these results as reflecting the interplay between two paths of AGN/host coevolution. A correlation of AGN luminosity and host star formation is traced locally over a wide range of luminosities and also extends to luminous high z AGN. This correlation reflects an evolutionary connection, likely via merging. For lower AGN luminosities, star formation is similar to that in non-active massive galaxies and shows little dependence on AGN luminosity. The level of this secular, non-merger driven star formation increasingly dominates over the correlation at increasing redshift.
  • We study the co-existence of star formation and AGN activity in X-ray selected AGN by analyzing stacked 870um submm emission from a deep and wide map of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, obtained with LABOCA at the APEX telescope. The total X-ray sample of 895 sources with median redshift z~1 is detected at a mean submm flux of 0.49+-0.04mJy, corresponding to a typical star formation rate around 30Msun/yr for a T=35K, beta=1.5 greybody far-infrared SED. The good S/N permits stacking analyses for subgroups. We observe a trend of star formation rate increasing with redshift. An increase of star formation rate with AGN luminosity is indicated at the highest L_2-10>~1E44erg/s luminosities only. Increasing trends with X-ray obscuration as expected in some AGN evolutionary scenarios are not observed for the bulk of the X-ray AGN sample but may be present for the highest intrinsic luminosity objects. This suggests a transition between two modes in the coexistence of AGN activity and star formation. For the bulk of the sample, the X-ray luminosity and obscuration of the AGN are not intimately linked to the global star formation rate of their hosts. The hosts are likely massive and forming stars secularly, at rates similar to the pervasive star formation seen in massive galaxies without an AGN at similar redshifts. The change indicated towards more intense star formation, and a more pronounced increase in star formation rates between unobscured and obscured AGN at highest luminosities suggests that luminous AGN follow an evolutionary path on which obscured AGN activity and intense star formation are linked, possibly via merging. Comparison to local hard X-ray selected AGN supports this interpretation. [Abridged]
  • We present the SINS survey with SINFONI of high redshift galaxies. With 80 objects observed and 63 detected, SINS is the largest survey of spatially resolved gas kinematics, morphologies, and physical properties of star-forming galaxies at z~1-3. We describe the selection of the targets, the observations, and the data reduction. We then focus on the "SINS Halpha sample" of 62 rest-UV/optically-selected sources at 1.3<z<2.6 for which we targeted primarily the Halpha and [NII] emission lines. Only 30% of this sample had previous near-IR spectroscopic observations. As a whole, the SINS Halpha sample covers a reasonable representation of massive log(M*/Msun)>~10 star-forming galaxies at z~1.5-2.5, with some bias towards bluer systems compared to pure K-selected samples due to the requirement of secure optical redshift. The sample spans two orders of magnitude in stellar mass and in absolute and specific star formation rates, with median values of approximately log(M*/Msun) = 10.5, 70 Msun/yr, and 3/Gyr. The ionized gas distribution and kinematics are spatially resolved on scales ranging from 1.5 kpc for adaptive optics assisted observations to typically 4-5 kpc for seeing-limited data. The Halpha morphologies tend to be irregular and/or clumpy. About one-third are rotation-dominated yet turbulent disks, another third comprises compact and velocity dispersion-dominated objects, and the remaining galaxies are clear interacting/merging systems; the fraction of rotation-dominated systems increases among the more massive part of the sample. The Halpha luminosities and equivalent widths suggest on average roughly twice higher dust attenuation towards the HII regions relative to the bulk of the stars, and comparable current and past-averaged star formation rates. [Abridged]
  • We present HST NICMOS+ACS and Spitzer IRAC+MIPS observations of 41 galaxies at 2<z<3.5 in the FIRES MS1054 field with red and blue rest-frame optical colors. About half of the galaxies are very compact (effective radii r_e < 1 kpc) at rest-frame optical wavelengths, the others are extended (1< r_e < 10 kpc). For reference, 1 kpc corresponds to 0.12 arcsec at z=2.5 in the adopted cosmology. We separate actively star forming galaxies from quiescent galaxies by modeling their rest-frame UV-NIR SEDs. The star forming galaxies span the full range of sizes, while the quiescent galaxies all have r_e<2kpc. In the redshift range where MIPS 24 micron imaging is a sensitive probe of re-radiated dust emission (z<2.5), the 24 micron fluxes confirm that the light of the small quiescent galaxies is dominated by old stars, rather than dust-enshrouded star formation or AGN activity. The inferred surface mass densities and velocity dispersions for the quiescent galaxies are very high compared to those in local galaxies. The galaxies follow a Kormendy relation (between surface brightness and size) with approximately the same slope as locally, but shifted to brighter surface brightnesses, consistent with a mean stellar formation redshift of z_f~5. This paper demonstrates a direct relation between star formation activity and size at z~2.5, and the existence of a significant population of massive, extremely dense, old stellar systems without readily identifiable counterparts in the local universe.
  • We combine samples of spiral galaxies and starburst systems observed with ISOCAM to investigate the reliability of mid-infrared (MIR) dust emission as a quantitative tracer of star formation (SF) activity. The total sample covers very diverse galactic environments and probes a much wider dynamic range in SF rate density than previous similar studies. We find that both the monochromatic 15 micron continuum and the 5-8.5 micron emission constitute excellent indicators of the SF rate as quantified by the Lyman continuum luminosity L_Lyc, within specified validity limits which are different for the two tracers. Normalized to projected surface area, the 15 micron luminosity S_15ct is directly proportional to S_Lyc over several orders of magnitude. Two regimes are distinguished from the relative offsets in the observed relation: the proportionality factor increases by a factor of ~ 5 between quiescent disks in spiral galaxies, and moderate to extreme star-forming environments in circumnuclear regions of spirals and in starburst systems. The transition occurs near S_Lyc ~ 10^2 L_sun pc^{-2} and is interpreted as due to very small dust grains starting to dominate the emission at 15 microns over aromatic species above this threshold. The 5-8.5 micron luminosity per unit area is also proportional to S_Lyc, with a single conversion factor from the most quiescent objects in the sample up to S_Lyc ~ 10^4 L_sun pc^{-2}, where the relation then flattens. The turnover is attributed to depletion of aromatic band carriers in the harsher conditions prevailing in extreme starbursts. The observed relations provide empirical calibrations useful for estimating SF rates from mid-IR observations in deeply embedded HII regions and obscured starbursts, and for predictions from evolutionary synthesis models.