• We have conducted an imaging survey with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera~3 (WFC3) of 70 Galactic Cepheids, typically within 1~kpc, with the aim of finding resolved physical companions. The WFC3 field typically covers the 0.1 pc area where companions are expected. In this paper, we identify 39 Cepheids having candidate companions, based on their positions in color--magnitude diagrams, and having separations $\geq$5$"$ from the Cepheids. We use follow-up observations of 14 of these candidates with XMM-Newton, and of one of them with ROSAT, to separate X-ray-active young stars (probable physical companions) from field stars (chance alignments). Our preliminary estimate, based on the optical and X-ray observations, is that only 3\% of the Cepheids in the sample have wide companions. Our survey easily detects resolved main-sequence companions as faint as spectral type K\null. Thus the fact that the two most probable companions (those of FF~Aql and RV~Sco) are earlier than type K is not simply a function of the detection limit. We find no physical companions having separations larger than 4,000~AU in the X-ray survey. Two Cepheids are exceptions in that they do have young companions at significantly larger separations ($\delta$~Cep and S~Nor), but both belong to a cluster or a loose association, so our working model is that they are not gravitationally bound binary members, but rather cluster/association members. All of these properties provide constraints on both star formation and subsequent dynamical evolution. The low frequency of true physical companions at separations $>\!5"$ is confirmed by examination of the subset of the nearest Cepheids and also the density of the fields.
  • We have made {\it XMM-Newton\/} observations of 14 Galactic Cepheids that have candidate resolved ($\geq$5$\arcsec$) companion stars based on our earlier {\it HST\/} WFC3 imaging survey. Main-sequence stars that are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids are expected to be strong X-ray producers in contrast to field stars. {\it XMM-Newton\/} exposures were set to detect essentially all companions hotter than spectral type M0 (corresponding to 0.5 $ M_\odot$.) The large majority of our candidate companions were not detected in X-rays, and hence are not confirmed as young companions. One resolved candidate (S~Nor \#4) was unambiguously detected, but the Cepheid is a member of a populous cluster. For this reason, it is likely that S~Nor \#4 is a cluster member rather than a gravitationally bound companion. Two further Cepheids (S~Mus and R~Cru) have X-ray emission that might be produced by either the Cepheid or the candidate resolved companion. A subsequent {\it Chandra} observation of S Mus shows that the X-rays are at the location of the Cepheid/spectroscopic binary. R Cru and also V659 Cen (also X-ray bright) have possible companions closer than 5$\arcsec$ (the limit for this study) which are the likely source of X-rays. One final X-ray detection (V473 Lyr) has no known optical companion, so the prime suspect is the Cepheid itself. It is a unique Cepheid with a variable amplitude.
  • We have examined high accuracy radial velocities of Cepheids to determine the binary frequency. The data are largely from the CORAVEL spectrophotometer and the Moscow version, with a typical uncertainty of $\leq1$~km~s$^{-1}$, and a time span from 1 to 20 years. A systemic velocity was obtained by removing the pulsation component using a high order Fourier series. From this data we have developed a list of stars showing no orbital velocity larger than $\pm1$~km~s$^{-1}$. The binary fraction was analyzed as a function of magnitude, and yields an apparent decrease in this fraction for fainter stars. We interpret this as incompleteness at fainter magnitudes, and derive the preferred binary fraction of $29\pm8$\% ( $20\pm6$\% per decade of orbital period) from the brightest 40 stars. Comparison of this fraction in this period range (1-20 years) implies a large fraction for the full period range. This is reasonable in that the high accuracy velocities are sensitive to the longer periods and smaller orbital velocity amplitudes in the period range sampled here. Thus the Cepheid velocity sample provides a sensitive detection in the period range between short period spectroscopic binaries and resolved companions. The recent identification of $\delta$ Cep as a binary with very low amplitude and high eccentricity underscores the fact that the binary fractions we derive are lower limits, to which other low amplitude systems will probably be added. The mass ratio (q) distribution derived from ultraviolet observations of the secondary is consistent with a flat distribution for the applicable period range (1 to 20 years).
  • Over the past decade, the Secret Lives of Cepheids (SLiC) program has been carried out at Villanova University to study aspects and behaviors of classical Cepheids that are still not well-understood. In this, the first of several planned papers on program Cepheids, we report the current results for delta Cep, the Cepheid prototype. Ongoing photometry has been obtained to search for changes in the pulsation period, light curve morphology and amplitude. Combining our photometry with the times of maximum light compilation by Berdnikov 2000 returns a small period change of dP/dt ~ -0.1006 +/- 0.0002 sec yr^-1. There is also evidence for a gradual light amplitude increase of ~0.011-mag (V-band) and ~0.012-mag (B-band) per decade over the last ~50 years. In addition, HST-COS UV spectrophotometry and XMM-Newton X-ray data were carried out to investigate the high-temperature plasmas present above the Cepheid photospheres. In total, from the five visits (eight exposures) with XMM-Newton, delta Cep is found to be a soft X-ray source (Lx [0.3--2 keV] ~ 4.5-13x10^28 erg sec^-1) with peak flux at kT = 0.6-0.9 keV. The X-ray activity is found to vary, possibly in phase with the stellar pulsations. From 2010-2013, nine observations of delta Cep were carried out with HST-COS. The UV emissions are also variable, and well-phased with the stellar pulsations. Maximum UV line emissions occur near, or slightly before, maximum optical light, varying by as much as twenty times. This variability shows that pulsation-induced shock-heating plays a significant role in Cepheid atmospheres, possibly in addition to a quiescent, magnetic heating. The results of this study show Cepheid atmospheres to be rather complex and dynamic.
  • The galactic Cepheid S Muscae has recently been added to the important list of Cepheids linked to open clusters, in this case the sparse young cluster ASCC 69. Low-mass members of a young cluster are expected to have rapid rotation and X-ray activity, making X-ray emission an excellent way to discriminate them from old field stars. We have made an XMM-Newton observation centered on S Mus and identified (Table 1) a population of X-ray sources whose near-IR 2MASS counterparts lie at locations in the J, (J-K) color-magnitude diagram consistent with cluster membership at the distance of S Mus. Their median energy and X-ray luminosity are consistent with young cluster members as distinct from field stars. These strengthen the association of S Mus with the young cluster, making it a potential Leavitt Law (Period-Luminosity relation) calibrator.
  • Cepheids provide approaches to determining binary parameters which are often complementary to those for main sequence massive and intermediate mass stars. Specifically, we are using high resolution imaging, radial velocities, and X-ray studies to determine binary characteristics. Among the results are that they have both a high frequency of binary systems, and also a high proportion of triple systems.
  • Classical Cepheids form one of the foundations of modern cosmology and the extragalactic distance scale, however, cosmic microwave background observations measure cosmological parameters and indirectly the Hubble Constant, H0, to unparalleled precision. The coming decade will provide opportunities to measure H0 to 2% uncertainty thanks to the GAIA satellite, JWST, ELTs and other telescopes using Cepheids and other standard candles. In this work, we discuss the upcoming role for variable stars and asteroseismology in calibrating the distance scale and measuring H0 and what problems exist in understanding these stars that will feedback on these measurements.
  • Deriving the distribution of binary parameters for a particular class of stars over the full range of orbital separations usually requires the combination of results from many different observing techniques (radial velocities, interferometry, astrometry, photometry, direct imaging), each with selection biases. However, Cepheids---cool, evolved stars of $\sim$$5\, M_\odot$---are a special case because ultraviolet spectra will immediately reveal any companion star hotter than early type A, {\it regardless of the orbital separation}. We have used {\it International Ultraviolet Explorer} (\IUE) UV spectra of a complete sample of all 76 Cepheids brighter than V=8 to create a list of {\it all 18} Cepheids with companions more massive than $2.0\, M_\odot$. Orbital periods of many of these binaries are available from radial-velocity studies, or can be estimated for longer-period systems from detected velocity variability. In an imaging survey with the {\it Hubble Space Telescope} Wide Field Camera 3, we resolved three of the companions (those of $\eta$ Aql, S Nor, and V659 Cen), allowing us to make estimates of the periods out to the long-period end of the distribution. Combining these separations with orbital data in the literature, we derive an unbiased distribution of binary separations, orbital periods, and mass ratios. The distribution of orbital periods shows that the $5\, M_\odot$ binaries have systematically shorter periods than do $1\, M_\odot$ stars. Our data also suggest that the distribution of mass ratios depends both on binary separation and system multiplicity. The distribution of mass ratios as a function of orbital separation, however, does not depend on whether a system is a binary or a triple.
  • We report on the analysis of an archival observation of part of the {\alpha} Persei cluster obtained with XMM-Newton. We detected 102 X-ray sources in the band 0.3-8.0 keV, of which 39 of them are associated with the cluster as evidenced by appropriate magnitudes and colors from 2MASS photometry. We extend the X-ray Luminosity Distribution (XLD) for M dwarfs, to add to the XLD found for hotter dwarfs from spatially extensive surveys of the whole cluster by ROSAT. Some of the hotter stars are identified as a background, possible slightly older group of stars at a distance of approximately 500 pc.
  • New instrumentation is providing new insights into intermediate mass pulsating Cepheids, particularly about their formation and history. Three approaches are discussed, using space (Hubble and Chandra) and ground-based studies (radial velocities). First, we are conducting a survey of Cepheids with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) to identify possible resolved companions (for example Eta Aql) and thus provide constraints on star formation. Followup X-ray observations (Chandra and XMM-Newton) can confirm whether possible low mass companions are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids. In a related study of intermediate mass stars, Chandra X-ray observations of late B stars in Tr 16 have been used to determine the fraction which have X-ray active low mass companions. Finally, the Tennessee State Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope AST and the Moscow University group have obtained velocities of a number of Cepheids. As an example, the orbit of V350 Sgr has been redetermined, providing a new level of accuracy to the orbital velocity amplitude, which is needed for mass determination.
  • We have developed lists of likely B3--A0 stars (called "late B" stars) in the young cluster Trumpler 16. The following criteria were used: location within 3' of Eta Car, an appropriate V and B-V combination, and proper motion (where available). Color and magnitude cuts have been made assuming an E(B-V) =0.55 mag +/- 0.1, which is a good approximation close to the center of Trumpler 16. These lists have been cross-correlated with X-ray sources found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP). Previous studies have shown that only very rarely (if at all) do late main sequence B stars produce X-rays. We present evidence that the X-ray detected sources are binaries with low-mass companions, since stars less massive than 1.4 Msun are strong X-ray sources at the age of the cluster. Both the median X-ray energies and X-ray luminosities of these sources are in good agreement with values for typical low-mass coronal X-ray sources. We find that 39% of the late B stars based on a list with proper motions have low-mass companions. Similarly, 32% of a sample without proper motions have low-mass companions. We discuss the X-ray detection completeness. These results on low-mass companions of intermediate mass stars are complementary to spectroscopic and interferometric results, and probe new parameter space of low mass companions at all separations. They do not support a steeply rising distribution of mass ratios to low masses for intermediate-mass (5 Msun) primaries, such as would be found by random pairing from the Initial Mass Function.
  • The Chandra Carina Complex contains 200 known O- and B type stars. The Chandra survey detected 68 of the 70 O stars and 61 of 127 known B0-B3 stars. We have assembled a publicly available optical/X-ray database to identify OB stars that depart from the canonical Lx/Lbol relation, or whose average X-ray temperatures exceed 1 keV. Among the single O stars with high kT we identify two candidate magnetically confined wind shock sources: Tr16-22, O8.5 V, and LS 1865, O8.5 V((f)). The O4 III(fc) star HD 93250 exhibits strong, hard, variable X-rays, suggesting it may be a massive binary with a period of >30 days. The visual O2 If* binary HD 93129A shows soft 0.6 keV and hard 1.9 keV emission components, suggesting embedded wind shocks close to the O2 If* Aa primary, and colliding wind shocks between Aa and Ab. Of the 11 known O-type spectroscopic binaries, the long orbital-period systems HD 93343, HD 93403 and QZ Car have higher shock temperatures than short-period systems such as HD 93205 and FO 15. Although the X-rays from most B stars may be produced in the coronae of unseen, low-mass pre-main-sequence companions, a dozen B stars with high Lx cannot be explained by a distribution of unseen companions. One of these, SS73 24 in the Treasure Chest cluster, is a new candidate Herbig Be star.
  • Multiwavelength opportunities have provided important new insights into the properties of binary/multiple 5 Msun stars. The combination of cool evolved primaries and hot secondaries in Cepheids (geriatric B stars) has yielded detailed information about the distribution of mass ratios. It has also provided a surprisingly high fraction of triple systems. Ground-based radial velocity orbits combined with satellite data from Hubble, FUSE, IUE, and Chandra can provide full information about the systems, including the masses. In particular, X-ray observations can identify low mass companions which are young enough to be physical companions. These multiwavelength observations provide important tests for star formation scenarios including diffenences between high and low mass results and differences between close and wide binaries.
  • The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this Special Issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.
  • Binary/multiple status can affect stars at all stages of their lifetimes: evolution onto the main sequence, properties on the main sequence, and subsequent evolution. 5 $M_\odot$ stars have provided a wealth of information about the binary properties fairly massive stars. The combination of cool evolved primaries and hot secondaries in Cepheids (geriatric B stars) have yielded detailed information about the distribution of mass ratios. and have also provided a surprisingly high fraction of triple systems. Ground-based radial velocity orbits combined with satellite data from Hubble, FUSE, IUE, and Chandra are needed to provide full information about the systems, including the masses. As a recent example, X-ray observations can identify low mass companions which are young enough to be physical companions. Typically binary status and properties (separation, eccentricity, mass ratio) determine whether any stage of evolution takes an exotic form.
  • Masses determined from classical Cepheids in binary systems are a primary test of both pulsation and evolutionary calculations. The first step is to determine the orbit from ground-based radial velocities. Complementary satellite data from Hubble, FUSE, IUE, and Chandra provide full information about the system. A summary of recent results on masses is given. Cepheids have also provided copious information about the multiplicity of massive stars, as well as the distribution of mass ratios and separations. This provides some important constraints for star formation scenarios including differences between high and low mass results and differences between close and wide binaries.
  • We have obtained spectra of the W Sgr system with the STIS spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The spectra resolve the system into a distant companion B which is the hottest star in the system and the spectroscopic binary (A = Aa + Ab). A and B are separated by 0.16". We have extracted the spectra of both of these. We see no flux in the Aa + Ab spectrum which cannot be accounted for by the Cepheid, and put an upper limit on the spectral type and mass of the companion Ab of F5 V and $\leq$1.4Msun. Using the orbit from HST FGS measurements from Benedict, et al., this results in an upper limit to the mass of the Cepheid of $\leq$5.4Msun. We also discuss two possible distant companions. Based on photometry from the 2MASS Point Source Catalog, they are not physical companions of the W Sgr system.
  • We describe Chandra/ACIS-I observations of the massive ~ 13--14 Myr-old cluster, h Persei, part of the famous Double Cluster (h and chi Persei) in Perseus. Combining the list of Chandra-detected sources with new optical/IR photometry and optical spectroscopy reveals ~ 165 X-ray bright stars with V < 23. Roughly 142 have optical magnitudes and colors consistent with cluster membership. The observed distribution of Lx peaks at Lx ~ 10^30.3 ergs/s and likely traces the bright edge of a far larger population of ~ 0.4--2 Msun X-ray active stars. From a short list of X-ray active stars with IRAC 8 micron excess from warm, terrestrial-zone dust, we derive a maximum X-ray flux incident on forming terrestrial planets. Although there is no correlation between X-ray activity and IRAC excess, the fractional X-ray luminosity correlates with optical colors and spectral type. By comparing the distribution of Lx/L* vs. spectral type and V-I in h Per with results for other 1--100 Myr-old clusters, we show that stars slightly more massive than the Sun (> 1.5 Msun) fall out of X-ray saturation by ~ 10--15 Myr. Changes in stellar structure for > 1.5 Msun stars likely play an important role in this decline of X-ray emission.
  • Polaris, the nearest and brightest classical Cepheid, is a single-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 30 years. Using the High Resolution Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at a wavelength of ~2255\AA, we have directly detected the faint companion at a separation of 0\farcs17. A second HST observation 1.04 yr later confirms orbital motion in a retrograde direction. By combining our two measures with the spectroscopic orbit of Kamper and an analysis of the Hipparcos and FK5 proper motions by Wielen et al., we find a mass for Polaris Aa of 4.5^{+2.2}_{-1.4} M_\odot--the first purely dynamical mass determined for any Cepheid. For the faint companion Polaris Ab we find a dynamical mass of 1.26^{+0.14}_{-0.07} M_\odot, consistent with an inferred spectral type of F6 V and with the flux difference of 5.4 mag observed at 2255\AA. The magnitude difference at the V band is estimated to be 7.2 mag. Continued HST observations will significantly reduce the mass errors, which are presently still too large to provide critical constraints on the roles of convective overshoot, mass loss, rotation, and opacities in the evolution of intermediate-mass stars. Our astrometry, combined with two centuries of archival measurements, also confirms that the well-known, more distant (18") visual companion, Polaris B, has a nearly common proper motion with that of the Aa,Ab pair. This is consistent with orbital motion in a long-period bound system. The ultraviolet brightness of Polaris B is in accordance with its known F3 V spectral type if it has the same distance as Polaris Aa,Ab.
  • The high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy made possible by the 1999 deployment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory has revolutionized our understanding of stellar X-ray emission. Many puzzles remain, though, particularly regarding the mechanisms of X-ray emission from OB stars. Although numerous individual stars have been observed in high-resolution, realizing the full scientific potential of these observations will necessitate studying the high-resolution Chandra dataset as a whole. To facilitate the rapid comparison and characterization of stellar spectra, we have compiled a uniformly processed database of all stars observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). This database, known as X-Atlas, is accessible through a web interface with searching, data retrieval, and interactive plotting capabilities. For each target, X-Atlas also features predictions of the low-resolution ACIS spectra convolved from the HETG data for comparison with stellar sources in archival ACIS images. Preliminary analyses of the hardness ratios, quantiles, and spectral fits derived from the predicted ACIS spectra reveal systematic differences between the high-mass and low-mass stars in the atlas and offer evidence for at least two distinct classes of high-mass stars. A high degree of X-ray variability is also seen in both high and low-mass stars, including Capella, long thought to exhibit minimal variability. X-Atlas contains over 130 observations of approximately 25 high-mass stars and 40 low-mass stars and will be updated as additional stellar HETG observations become public. The atlas has recently expanded to non-stellar point sources, and Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) observations are currently being added as well.
  • Polaris, the nearest and brightest classical Cepheid, is a member of at least a triple system. It has a wide ($18''$) physical companion, the F-type dwarf Polaris B. Polaris itself is a single-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 30 years (Kamper, 1996, JRASC, 90, 140). By combining {\it Hipparcos} measurements of the instantaneous proper motion with long-term measurements and the Kamper radial-velocity orbit, Wielen et al. (2000, A&A, 360, 399) have predicted the astrometric orbit of the close companion. Using the {\it Hubble Space Telescope} and the Advanced Camera for Surveys' High-Resolution Channel with an ultraviolet (F220W) filter, we have now directly detected the close companion. Based on the Wielen et al. orbit, the {\it Hipparcos} parallax, and our measurement of the separation ($0.176''$ $\pm$ $0.002''$), we find a preliminary mass of 5.0 $\pm$ 1.5 M$_{\odot}$ for the Cepheid and 1.38 $\pm$ 0.61 M$_{\odot}$ for the close companion. These values will be refined by additional {\it HST} observations scheduled for the next 3 years. We have also obtained a {\it Chandra} ACIS-I image of the Polaris field. Two distant companions C and D are not X-rays sources and hence are not young enough to be physical companions of the Cepheid. There is one additional stellar X-ray source in the field, located $253''$ from Polaris A, which is a possible companion. Further investigation of such a distant companion is valuable to confirm the full extent of the system.
  • S Mus is the Cepheid with the hottest known companion. The large ultraviolet flux means that it is the only Cepheid companion for which the velocity amplitude could be measured with the echelle mode of the HST GHRS. Unfortunately, the high temperature is difficult to constrain at wavelengths longer than 1200 \AA because of the degeneracy between temperature and reddening. We have obtained a FUSE spectrum in order to improve the determination of the temperature of the companion. Two regions which are temperature sensitive near 16,000 K but relatively unaffected by H$_2$ absorption (940 \AA, and the Ly $\beta$ wings) have been identified. By comparing FUSE spectra of S Mus B with spectra of standard stars, we have determined a temperature of 17,000 $\pm$ 500 K. The resultant Cepheid mass is 6.0 $\pm$ 0.4 M$_\odot$. This mass is consistent with main sequence evolutionary tracks with a moderate amount of convective overshoot.
  • The low resolution X-ray spectra around $\eta$ Car covering Tr 16 and part of Tr 14 have been extracted from a Chandra CCD ACIS image. Various analysis techniques have been applied to the spectra based on their count rates. The spectra with the greatest number of counts (HD 93162 = WR 25, HD 93129AB, and HD 93250) have been fit with a wind model, which uses several components with different temperatures and depths in the wind. Weaker spectra have been fit with Raymond-Smith models. The weakest spectra are simply inter-compared with strong spectra. In general, fits produce reasonable parameters based on knowledge of the extinction from optical studies and on the range of temperatures for high and low mass stars. Direct comparisons of spectra confirm the consistency of the fitting results and also hardness ratios for cases of unusually large extinction in the clusters. The spectra of the low mass stars are harder than the more massive stars. Stars in the sequence evolving from the main sequence (HD 93250) through the system containing the O supergiant (HD 93129AB) and then through the Wolf-Rayet stage (HD93162), presumably ending in the extreme example of $\eta$ Car, share the property of being unusually luminous and hard in X-rays. For these X-ray luminous stars, their high mass and evolutionary status (from the very last stages of the main sequence and beyond) is the common feature. Their binary status is mixed, and magnetic status is still uncertain.
  • The region around the $\eta$ Car nebula has three OB associations, which contain a Wolf-Rayet star and several massive O3 stars. An early Chandra ACIS-I image was centered on $\eta$ Car and includes Trumpler 16 and part of Trumpler 14. The Chandra image confirms the well-known result that O and very early B stars are X-ray sources with L$_X$ $\simeq$ 10$^{-7} \times$ L$_{bol}$ over an X-ray luminosity range of about 100. Two new anomalously strong X-ray sources have been found among the hot star population, Tr 16-244, a heavily-reddened O3 I star, and Tr 16-22, a heavily-reddened O8.5 V star. Two stars have an unusually large L$_X$/L$_{bol}$: HD 93162, a Wolf-Rayet star (and possible binary), and Tr 16-22, a possible colliding wind binary In addition, a population of sources associated with cool stars is detected. In the color-magnitude diagram, these X-ray sources sit above the sequence of field stars in the Carina arm. The OB stars are on average more X-ray luminous than the cool star X-ray sources. X-ray sources among A stars have similar X-ray luminosities to cooler stars, and may be due to cooler companions. Upper limits are presented for B stars which are not detected in X-rays. These upper limits are also the upper limits for any cool companions which the hot stars may have. Hardness ratios are presented for the most luminous sources in bands 0.5 to 0.9 keV, 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and 1.5 to 2.04 kev. The available information on the binary nature of the hot stars is discussed, but binarity does not correlate with X-ray strength in a simple way.
  • We have measured the centroid shift of low resolution HST FOC spectra as the dominant star changes from the Cepheid to the hot companion. With this approach we have resolved the AW Per system and marginally resolved the U Aql system.