• We conducted systematic observations of the HI Br-alpha line (4.05 micron) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature (3.3 micron) in 50 nearby (z<0.3) ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with AKARI. The Br-alpha line is predicted to be the brightest among the HI lines under high dust-extinction conditions (A_V>15 mag). The Br-alpha line traces ionizing photons from OB stars and so is used as an indicator of star formation on the assumption of the initial mass function. We detected the Br-alpha line in 33 ULIRGs. The luminosity of the line (L_BrA) correlates well with that of the 3.3 micron PAH emission (L_3.3). Thus we utilize L_3.3 as an indicator of star formation in fainter objects where the Br-alpha line is undetected. The mean L_BrA/L_IR ratio in LINERs/Seyferts is significantly lower than that in HII galaxies. This difference is reconfirmed with the L_3.3/L_IR ratio in the larger sample (46 galaxies). Using the ratios, we estimate that the contribution of starburst in LINERs/Seyferts is ~67%, and active galactic nuclei contribute to the remaining ~33%. However, comparing the number of ionizing photons, Q_BrA, derived from L_BrA with that, Q_IR, expected from star formation rate required to explain L_IR, we find that the mean Q_BrA/Q_IR ratio is only 55.5+/-7.5% even in HII galaxies which are thought to be energized by pure starburst. This deficit of ionizing photons traced by the Br-alpha line is significant even taking heavy dust extinction into consideration. We propose that dust within HII regions absorbs a significant fraction of ionizing photons.
  • 23 giant flares from 13 active stars (eight RS CVn systems, one Algol system, three dMe stars and one YSO) were detected during the first two years of our all-sky X-ray monitoring with the gas propotional counters (GSC) of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). The observed parameters of all of these MAXI/GSC flares are found to be at the upper ends for stellar flares with the luminosity of 10^(31-34) ergs s-1 in the 2-20 keV band, the emission measure of 10^(54-57) cm-3, the e-folding time of 1 hour to 1.5 days, and the total radiative energy released during the flare of 10^(34-39) ergs. Notably, the peak X-ray luminosity of 5(3-9)*10^33 ergs s-1 in the 2-20 keV band was detected in one of the flares on II Peg, which is one of the, or potentially the, largest ever observed in stellar flares. X-ray flares were detected from GT Mus, V841 Cen, SZ Psc, and TWA-7 for the first time in this survey. Whereas most of our detected sources are multiple-star systems, two of them are single stars (YZ CMi and TWA-7). Among the stellar sources within 100 pc distance, the MAXI/GSC sources have larger rotation velocities than the other sources. This suggests that the rapid rotation velocity may play a key role in generating large flares. Combining the X-ray flare data of nearby stars and the sun, taken from literature and our own data, we discovered a universal correlation of tau~L_X^0.2 for the flare duration tau and the intrinsic X-ray luminosity L_X in the 0.1-100 keV band, which holds for 5 and 12 orders of magnitude in tau and L_X, respectively. The MAXI/GSC sample is located at the highest ends on the correlation.
  • Nearby active galactic nuclei were diagnosed in the X-ray and mid-to-far infrared wavelengths, with Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) and the Japanese infrared observatory AKARI, respectively. Among the X-ray sources listed in the second release of the MAXI all-sky X-ray source catalog, 100 ones are currently identified as a non-blazar-type active galactic nucleus. These include 95 Seyfert galaxies and 5 quasars, and they are composed of 73 type-1 and 27 type-2 objects. The AKARI all-sky survey point source catalog was searched for their mid- and far-infrared counterparts at 9, 18, and 90 $\mu$m. As a result, 69 Seyfert galaxies in the MAXI catalog (48 type-1 and 21 type-2 ones) were found to be detected with AKARI. The X-ray (3-4 keV and 4-10 keV) and infrared luminosities of these objects were investigated, together with their color information. Adopting the canonical photon index, $\Gamma = 1.9$, of the intrinsic X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert galaxies, the X-ray hardness ratio between the 3-4 and 4-10 keV ranges derived with MAXI was roughly converted into the absorption column density. After the X-ray luminosity was corrected for absorption from the estimated column density, the well-known X-ray-to-infrared luminosity correlation was confirmed at least in the Compton-thin regime. In contrast, NGC 1365, only one Compton-thick object in the MAXI catalog, was found to deviate from the correlation toward a significantly lower X-ray luminosity by nearly an order of magnitude. It was verified that the relation between the X-ray hardness below 10 keV and X-ray-to-infrared color acts as an effective tool to pick up Compton-thick objects. The difference in the infrared colors between the type-1 and type-2 Seyfert galaxies and its physical implication on the classification and unification of active galactic nuclei were briefly discussed.
  • The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO) has detected direct signals of gravitational waves (GWs) from GW150914. The event was a merger of binary black holes whose masses are $36^{+5}_{-4}M_{\odot}$ and $29^{+4}_{-4}M_{\odot}$. Such binary systems are expected to be directly evolved from stellar binary systems or formed by dynamical interactions of black holes in dense stellar environments. Here we derive the binary black hole merger rate based on the nearby ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) luminosity function (LF) under the assumption that binary black holes evolve through X-ray emitting phases. We obtain the binary black hole merger rate as $5.8 ({t}_{\rm ULX}/{0.1 \ \rm Myr})^{-1} \lambda^{-0.6} \exp{(-0.30\lambda)} \ {\rm Gpc^{-3}\ yr^{-1}}$, where $t_{\rm ULX}$ is the typical duration of the ULX phase and $\lambda$ is the Eddington ratio in luminosity. This is coincident with the event rate inferred from the detection of GW150914 as well as the predictions based on binary population synthesis models. Although we are currently unable to constrain the Eddington ratio of ULXs in luminosity due to the uncertainties of our models and measured binary black hole merger event rates, further X-ray and GW data will allow us to narrow down the range of the Eddington ratios of ULXs. We also find the cumulative merger rate for the mass range of $5M_\odot\le M_{\rm BH}\le100M_\odot$ inferred from the ULX LF is consistent with that estimated by the aLIGO collaboration considering various astrophysical conditions such as the mass function of black holes.
  • X-ray emission associated with the west lobe of the giant radio galaxy, 3C 236, was investigated with the Suzaku observatory, to evaluate the energetics in the lobe. After removing contamination from X-ray sources detected with Chandra and subtracting the X-ray and non-X-ray backgrounds, the Suzaku spectrum from the lobe was reproduced by a power-low model with a photon index of $\Gamma = 2.23_{-0.38-0.12}^{+0.44+0.14}$ where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones, respectively. Within the errors, the X-ray index was consistent with the radio synchrotron one, $\Gamma_{\rm R} = 1.74 \pm 0.07$, estimated in the 326 -- 2695 MHz range. This agreement supports that the X-ray emission is attributed to the inverse-Compton (IC) radiation from the synchrotron electrons filling the lobe, where the cosmic microwave background photons are up-scattered. This result made 3C 236 the largest radio galaxy, of which the lobe has ever been probed through the IC X-ray photons. When the photon index was fixed at $\Gamma_{\rm R}$, the X-ray flux density at 1 keV was measured as $S_{\rm X} = 12.3 \pm 2.0 \pm 1.9$ nJy. A comparison of the X-ray flux to the radio one ($S_{\rm R} = 1.11 \pm 0.02$ Jy at 608.5 MHz) yields the energy densities of the electrons and magnetic field in the west lobe as $u_{\rm e} = 3.9_{-0.7 -0.9}^{+0.6 +1.0} \times 10^{-14} $ ergs cm$^{-3}$ and $u_{\rm m} = 0.92_{-0.15 -0.35}^{+0.21 +0.52}\times 10^{-14} $ ergs cm$^{-3}$, respectively, indicating a mild electron dominance of $u_{\rm e}/u_{\rm m} = 4.2_{-1.3 -2.3}^{+1.6 +4.1}$. The latter corresponds to the magnetic field strength of $B = 0.48_{-0.04 -0.10}^{+0.05 +0.12}$ $\mu$G.These are typical among the lobes of giant radio galaxies. A compilation of the $u_{\rm e}$-size relation for the IC-detected radio galaxies implies that the west lobe of 3C 236 is still actively energized by its jet.
  • Since August 2009, MAXI experiment on the ISS has been performing all-sky X-ray monitoring. With MAXI, we detected flaring activities of some blazers, including Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 3C 273. Recently, new X-ray flaring activities were detected from two blazers, MAXI J1930+093 = 2FGL J1931.1+0938 (Atel#5943) and 2MAXI J0243-582 = BZB J0244-5819 (Atel#6012). The MAXI monitoring also covers black hole binaries, including Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3 which emit GeV gamma-rays. Their gamma-ray emission was found to coincide with their X-ray state transitions. We present light curves and outstanding events of these sources.
  • The archetypical very-high-energy gamma-ray blazar Mrk 421 was monitored for more than 3 years with the Gas Slit Camera onboard Monitor of All Sky X-ray Image (MAXI), and its longterm X-ray variability was investigated. The MAXI lightcurve in the 3 -- 10 keV range was transformed to the periodogram in the frequency range $f = 1 \times 10^{-8}$ -- $2 \times 10^{-6}$ Hz. The artifacts on the periodogram, resulting from data gaps in the observed lightcurve, were extensively simulated for variations with a power-law like Power Spectrum Density (PSD). By comparing the observed and simulated periodograms, the PSD index was evaluated as $\alpha = 1.60 \pm 0.25$. This index is smaller than that obtained in the higher frequency range ($f > 1 \times 10^{-5}$ Hz), namely, $\alpha = 2.14 \pm 0.06$ in the 1998 ASCA observation of the object. The MAXI data impose a lower limit on the PSD break at $f_{\rm b} = 5 \times 10^{-6}$ Hz, consistent with the break of $f_{\rm b} = 9.5 \times 10^{-6}$ Hz, suggested from the ASCA data. The low frequency PSD index of Mrk 421 derived with MAXI falls well within the range of the typical value among nearby Seyfert galaxies ($\alpha = 1$ -- $2$). The physical implications from these results are briefly discussed.
  • In this work, we investigate the dependence of the covering factor (CF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) (i) on the mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity and (ii) on the redshift. We constructed 12- and 22-micron luminosity functions (LFs) at 0.006 < z < 0.3 using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) data. Combining the WISE catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic data, we selected 223,982 galaxies at 12 micron and 25,721 galaxies at 22 micron for spectroscopic classification. We then identified 16,355 AGNs at 12 micron and 4,683 AGNs at 22 micron by their optical emission lines and cataloged classifications in the SDSS. Following that, we estimated the CF as the fraction of type 2 AGN in all AGNs whose MIR emissions are dominated by the active nucleus (not their host galaxies) based on their MIR colors. We found that (i) the CF decreased with increasing MIR luminosity, regardless of the choice of type 2 AGN classification criteria, and (ii) the CF did not change significantly with the redshift for z < 0.2. Furthermore, we carried out various tests to determine the influence of selection bias and confirmed similar dependences exist even when taking these uncertainties into account. The luminosity dependence of the CF can be explained by the receding torus model, but the "modified" receding torus model gives a slightly better fit, as suggested by Simpson.
  • We made simultaneous single-dish and very long baseline interferometer (VLBI) observations of a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) 1H 0323+342, showing gamma-ray activity revealed by Fermi/LAT observations. We found significant variation of the total flux density at 8 GHz on the time scale of one month by the single-dish monitoring. The total flux density varied by 5.5% in 32 days, which is comparable to the gamma-ray variability time scale, corresponding to the variability brightness temperature of $7.0 \times 10^{11}$ K. The source consists of central and southeastern components on the parsec (pc) scale. The flux of only the central component decreased in the same way as the total flux density, indicating that the short-term radio variability, and probably the gamma-ray emitting region, is associated with this component. From the VLBI observations we obtained the brightness temperatures of greater than $(5.2 \pm 0.3) \times 10^{10}$ K, and derived the equipartition Doppler factor of greater than 1.7, the variability Doppler factor of 2.2, and the 8 GHz radio power of $10^{24.6}$ W Hz$^{-1}$. Combining them we conclude that acceleration of radio jets and creation of high-energy particles are ongoing in the central engine, and that the apparent very radio-loud feature of the source is due to the Doppler-boosting effect, resulting in the intrinsic radio loudness to be an order of magnitude smaller than the observed values. We also conclude that the pc-scale jet represents recurrent activity from the the spectral fitting and the estimated kinematic age of pc- and kpc-scale extended components with different position angle.
  • An observation of the West lobe of radio galaxy Fornax A (NGC 1316) with Suzaku is reported. Since Feigelson et al. (1995) and Kaneda et al. (1995) discovered the cosmic microwave background boosted inverse-Comptonized (IC) X-rays from the radio lobe, the magnetic field and electron energy density in the lobes have been estimated under the assumption that a single component of the relativistic electrons generates both the IC X-rays and the synchrotron radio emission. However, electrons generating the observed IC X-rays in the 1 -- 10 keV band do not possess sufficient energy to radiate the observed synchrotron radio emission under the estimated magnetic field of a few micro-G. On the basis of observations made with Suzaku, we show in the present paper that a 0.7 -- 20 keV spectrum is well described by a single power-law model with an energy index of 0.68 and a flux density of 0.12+/-0.01 micro-Jy at 1 keV from the West lobe. The derived multiwavelength spectrum strongly suggests that a single electron energy distribution over a Lorentz factor gamma = 300 - 90000 is responsible for generating both the X-ray and radio emissions. The derived physical quantities are not only consistent with those reported for the West lobe, but are also in very good agreement with those reported for the East lobe.
  • We present the catalog of high Galactic-latitude ($|b|>10^{\circ}$) X-ray sources detected in the first 37-month data of Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) / Gas Slit Camera (GSC). To achieve the best sensitivity, we develop a background model of the GSC that well reproduces the data based on the detailed on-board calibration. Source detection is performed through image fit with the Poisson likelihood algorithm. The catalog contains 500 objects detected in the 4--10 keV band with significance of $s_{\rm D, 4-10 keV} \geq 7$. The limiting sensitivity is $\approx 7.5\times10^{-12}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ ($\approx 0.6$ mCrab) in the 4--10 keV band for 50% of the survey area, which is the highest ever achieved as an all-sky survey mission covering this energy band. We summarize the statistical properties of the catalog and results from cross matching with the Swift/BAT 70-month catalog, the meta-catalog of X-ray detected clusters of galaxies, and the MAXI/GSC 7-month catalog. Our catalog lists the source name (2MAXI), position and its error, detection significances and fluxes in the 4--10 keV and 3--4 keV bands, their hardness ratio, and basic information of the likely counterpart available for 296 sources.
  • We report on the spectral evolution of a new X-ray transient, MAXI J0556-332, observed by MAXI, Swift, and RXTE. The source was discovered on 2011 January 11 (MJD=55572) by MAXI Gas Slit Camera all-sky survey at (l,b)=(238.9deg, -25.2deg), relatively away from the Galactic plane. Swift/XRT follow-up observations identified it with a previously uncatalogued bright X-ray source and led to optical identification. For more than one year since its appearance, MAXI J0556-332 has been X-ray active, with a 2-10 keV intensity above 30 mCrab. The MAXI/GSC data revealed rapid X-ray brightening in the first five days, and a hard-to-soft transition in the meantime. For the following ~ 70 days, the 0.5-30 keV spectra, obtained by the Swift/XRT and the RXTE/PCA on an almost daily basis, show a gradual hardening, with large flux variability. These spectra are approximated by a cutoff power-law with a photon index of 0.4-1 and a high-energy exponential cutoff at 1.5-5 keV, throughout the initial 10 months where the spectral evolution is mainly represented by a change of the cutoff energy. To be more physical, the spectra are consistently explained by thermal emission from an accretion disk plus a Comptonized emission from a boundary layer around a neutron star. This supports the source identification as a neutron-star X-ray binary. The obtained spectral parameters agree with those of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the soft state, whose luminosity is higher than 1.8x10^37 erg s^-1. This suggests a source distance of >17 kpc.
  • In order to elucidate the emission properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) during their power-law (PL) state, we examined long-term X-ray spectral data of IC342 X-1 during its PL state by using our own Suzaku data and the archival data by XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift observations. The PL state of this source seems to be classified into two sub-states in terms of the X-ray luminosities in 0.5-10 keV: the low luminosity PL state with 4-6*10^{39} erg/s and the high luminosity one with 1.1-1.4*10^{40} erg/s. During the Suzaku observations which were made in 2010 August and 2011 March, X-1 stayed in the low luminosity PL state. The observed X-ray luminosity (4.9-5.6*10^{39} erg/s) and the spectral shape (photon index = 1.67-1.83) slightly changed between the two observations. Using the Suzaku PIN detector, we for the first time confirmed a PL tail extending up to at least 20 keV with no signatures of a high-energy turnover in both of the Suzaku observations. In contrast, a turnover at about 6 keV was observed during the high luminosity PL state in 2004 and 2005 with XMM-Newton. Importantly, photon indices are similar between the two PL states and so is the Compton y-parameters of y ~ 1, which indicates a similar energy balance (between the corona and the accretion disk) holding in the two PL states despite different electron temperatures. From spectral similarities with recent studies about other ULXs and the Galactic black hole binary GRS1915+105, IC342 X-1 is also likely to be in a state with a supercritical accretion rate, although more sensitive higher energy observations would be necessary to conclude.
  • The X-ray spectrum of the nearest ultraluminous X-ray source, M33 X-8, obtained by Suzaku during 2010 January 11 -- 13, was closely analyzed to examine its nature. It is, by far, the only data with the highest signal statistic in 0.4 -- 10 keV range. Despite being able to reproduce the X-ray spectrum, Comptonization of the disk photons failed to give a physically meaningful solution. A modified version of the multi-color disk model, in which the dependence of the disk temperature on the radius is described as r^(-p) with p being a free parameter, can also approximate the spectrum. From this model, the innermost disk temperature and bolometric luminosity were obtained as T_in = 2.00-0.05+0.06 keV and L_disk = 1.36 x 10^39 (cos i)^(-1) ergs/s, respectively, where i is the disk inclination. A small temperature gradient of p = 0.535-0.005+0.004, together with the high disk temperature, is regarded as the signatures of the slim accretion disk model, suggesting that M33 X-8 was accreting at high mass accretion rate. With a correction factor for the slim disk taken into account, the innermost disk radius, R_in =81.9-6.5+5.9 (cos i)^(-0.5) km, corresponds to the black hole mass of M \sim 10 M_sun (cos i)^(-0.5). Accordingly, the bolometric disk luminosity is estimated to be about 80 (cos i)^(-0.5)% of the Eddington limit. A numerically calculated slim disk spectrum was found to reach a similar result. Thus, the extremely super-Eddington luminosity is not required to explain the nature of M33 X-8. This conclusion is utilized to argue for the existence of intermediate mass black holes with M > 100 M_sun radiating at the sub/trans-Eddington luminosity, among ultraluminous X-ray sources with L_disk > 10^(40) ergs/s.
  • We combine data from two all-sky surveys in order to study the connection between the infrared and hard X-ray (>10keV) properties for local active galactic nuclei (AGN). The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope all-sky survey provides an unbiased, flux-limited selection of hard X-ray detected AGN. Cross-correlating the 22-month hard X-ray survey with the AKARI all-sky survey, we studied 158 AGN detected by the AKARI instruments. We find a strong correlation for most AGN between the infrared (9, 18, and 90 micron) and hard X-ray (14-195 keV) luminosities, and quantify the correlation for various subsamples of AGN. Partial correlation analysis confirms the intrinsic correlation after removing the redshift contribution. The correlation for radio galaxies has a slope and normalization identical to that for Seyfert 1s, implying similar hard X-ray/infrared emission processes in both. In contrast, Compton-thick sources show a large deficit in the hard X-ray band, because high gas column densities diminish even their hard X-ray luminosities. We propose two photometric diagnostics for source classification: one is an X-ray luminosity vs. infrared color diagram, in which type 1 radio-loud AGN are well isolated from the others in the sample. The other uses the X-ray vs. infrared color as a useful redshift-independent indicator for identifying Compton-thick AGN. Importantly, Compton-thick AGN and starburst galaxies in composite systems can also be differentiated in this plane based upon their hard X-ray fluxes and dust temperatures. This diagram may be useful as a new indicator to classify objects in new and upcoming surveys such as WISE and NuSTAR.
  • We report on the first observation of an X-ray outburst of a Be/X-ray binary pulsar LS V +44 17/RX J0440.9+4431, and the discovery of an absorption dip structure in the pulse profile. An outburst of this source was discovered by MAXI GSC in 2010 April. It was the first detection of the transient activity of LS V +44 17 since the source was identified as a Be/X-ray binary in 1997. From the data of the follow-up RXTE observation near the peak of the outburst, we found a narrow dip structure in its pulse profile which was clearer in the lower energy bands. The pulse-phase-averaged energy spectra in the 3$-$100 keV band can be fitted with a continuum model containing a power-law function with an exponential cutoff and a blackbody component, which are modified at low energy by an absorption component. A weak iron K$\alpha$ emission line is also detected in the spectra. From the pulse-phase-resolved spectroscopy we found that the absorption column density at the dip phase was much higher than those in the other phases. The dip was not seen in the subsequent RXTE observations at lower flux levels. These results suggest that the dip in the pulse profile originates from the eclipse of the radiation from the neutron star by the accretion column.
  • We present the results of monitoring the Galactic black hole candidate GX 339-4 with the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) / Gas Slit Camera (GSC) in the high/soft state during the outburst in 2010. All the spectra throughout the 8-month period are well reproduced with a model consisting of multi-color disk (MCD) emission and its Comptonization component, whose fraction is <= 25% in the total flux. In spite of the flux variability over a factor of 3, the innermost disk radius is constant at R_in = 61 +/- 2 km for the inclination angle of i = 46 deg and the distance of d=8 kpc. This R_in value is consistent with those of the past measurements with Tenma in the high/soft state. Assuming that the disk extends to the innermost stable circular orbit of a non-spinning black hole, we estimate the black hole mass to be M = 6.8 +/- 0.2 M_sun for i = 46 deg and d = 8 kpc, which is consistent with that estimated from the Suzaku observation of the previous low/hard state. Further combined with the mass function, we obtain the mass constraint of 4.3 M_sun < M < 13.3 M_sun for the allowed range of d = 6-15 kpc and i < 60 deg. We also discuss the spin parameter of the black hole in GX 339-4 by applying relativistic accretion disk models to the Swift/XRT data.
  • We construct a new X-ray (2--10 keV) luminosity function of Compton-thin active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the local universe, using the first MAXI/GSC source catalog surveyed in the 4--10 keV band. The sample consists of 37 non-blazar AGNs at $z=0.002-0.2$, whose identification is highly ($>97%$) complete. We confirm the trend that the fraction of absorbed AGNs with $N_{\rm H} > 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ rapidly decreases against luminosity ($L_{\rm X}$), from 0.73$\pm$0.25 at $L_{\rm X} = 10^{42-43.5}$ erg s$^{-1}$ to 0.12$\pm0.09$ at $L_{\rm X} = 10^{43.5-45.5}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The obtained luminosity function is well fitted with a smoothly connected double power-law model whose indices are $\gamma_1 = 0.84$ (fixed) and $\gamma_2 = 2.0\pm0.2$ below and above the break luminosity, $L_{*} = 10^{43.3\pm0.4}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, respectively. While the result of the MAXI/GSC agrees well with that of HEAO-1 at $L_{\rm X} \gtsim 10^{43.5}$ erg s$^{-1}$, it gives a larger number density at the lower luminosity range. Comparison between our luminosity function in the 2--10 keV band and that in the 14--195 keV band obtained from the Swift/BAT survey indicates that the averaged broad band spectra in the 2--200 keV band should depend on luminosity, approximated by $\Gamma\sim1.7$ for $L_{\rm X} \ltsim 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$ while $\Gamma\sim 2.0$ for $L_{\rm X} \gtsim 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. This trend is confirmed by the correlation between the luminosities in the 2--10 keV and 14--195 keV bands in our sample. We argue that there is no contradiction in the luminosity functions between above and below 10 keV once this effect is taken into account.
  • We present a large X-ray flare from a nearby weak-lined T Tauri star TWA-7 detected with the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) on the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). The GSC captured X-ray flaring from TWA-7 with a flux of $3\times10^{-9}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in 2--20 keV band during the scan transit starting at UT 2010-09-07 18:24:30.The estimated X-ray luminosity at the scan in the energy band is 3$\times10^{32}$ ergs s$^{-1}$,indicating that the event is among the largest X-ray flares fromT Tauri stars.Since MAXI GSC monitors a target only during a scan transit of about a minute per 92 min orbital cycle, the luminosity at the flare peak might have been higher than that detected. At the scan transit, we observed a high X-ray-to-bolometric luminosity ratio, log $L_{\rm X}/L_{\rm bol}$ = $-0.1^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$; i.e., the X-ray luminosity is comparable to the bolometric luminosity. Since TWA-7 has neither an accreting disk nor a binary companion, the observed event implies that none of those are essential to generate such big flares in T Tauri stars.
  • We present the first unbiased source catalog of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) mission at high Galactic latitudes ($|b| > 10^{\circ}$), produced from the first 7-month data (2009 September 1 to 2010 March 31) of the Gas Slit Camera in the 4--10 keV band. We develop an analysis procedure to detect faint sources from the MAXI data, utilizing a maximum likelihood image fitting method, where the image response, background, and detailed observational conditions are taken into account. The catalog consists of 143 X-ray sources above 7 sigma significance level with a limiting sensitivity of $\sim1.5\times10^{-11}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (1.2 mCrab) in the 4--10 keV band. Among them, we identify 38 Galactic/LMC/SMC objects, 48 galaxy clusters, 39 Seyfert galaxies, 12 blazars, and 1 galaxy. Other 4 sources are confused with multiple objects, and one remains unidentified. The log $N$ - log $S$ relation of extragalactic objects is in a good agreement with the HEAO-1 A-2 result, although the list of the brightest AGNs in the entire sky has significantly changed since that in 30 years ago.
  • The monitor of all-sky X-ray image (MAXI) Gas Slit Camera (GSC) on the International Space Station (ISS) detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB) on 2009, September 26, GRB\,090926B. This GRB had extremely hard spectra in the X-ray energy range. Joint spectral fitting with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope shows that this burst has peculiarly narrow spectral energy distribution and is represented by Comptonized blackbody model. This spectrum can be interpreted as photospheric emission from the low baryon-load GRB fireball. Calculating the parameter of fireball, we found the size of the base of the flow $r_0 = (4.3 \pm 0.9) \times 10^{9} \, Y^{\prime \, -3/2}$ cm and Lorentz factor of the plasma $\Gamma = (110 \pm 10) \, Y^{\prime \, 1/4}$, where $Y^{\prime}$ is a ratio between the total fireball energy and the energy in the blackbody component of the gamma-ray emission. This $r_0$ is factor of a few larger, and the Lorentz factor of 110 is smaller by also factor of a few than other bursts that have blackbody components in the spectra.
  • We report on the MAXI GSC X-ray monitoring of the Crab nebula and pulsar during the GeV gamma-ray flare for the period of 2010 September 18-24 (MJD 55457-55463) detected by AGILE and Fermi-LAT. There were no significant variations on the pulse phase averaged and pulsed fluxes during the gamma-ray flare on time scales from 0.5 to 5 days. The pulse profile also showed no significant change during this period. The upper limits on the variations of the pulse phase averaged and pulsed fluxes for the period MJD 55457.5-55462.5 in the 4-10 keV band are derived to be 1 and 19%, respectively, at the 90% confidence limit of the statistical uncertainty. The lack of variations in the pulsed component over the multi-wavelength range (radio, X-ray, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray) supports not the pulsar but the nebular origin for the gamma-ray flare.
  • A careful analysis of the Suzaku data of the giant radio galaxy DA 240, of which the size is 1.48 Mpc, revealed diffuse X-ray emission associated with its east lobe. The diffuse X-ray spectrum was described with a simple power-law model with a photon index of 1.92 (-0.17+0.13) (-0.06+0.04), where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones. The agreement with the synchrotron radio photon index, 1.95 +- 0.01 in 326 -- 608.5 MHz, ensures that the excess X-ray emission is attributed to the inverse Compton emission from the synchrotron-radiating electrons, boosting up the cosmic microwave background photons. From the X-ray flux density, 51.5 +-3.9 (-5.4+6.2) nJy at 1 keV derived with the photon index fixed at the radio index, in comparison with the synchrotron radio intensity of 10.30 +- 0.12 Jy at 326 MHz, the magnetic and electron energy densities was estimated as u_m = (3.0 +-0.2 +-0.4) \times 10^(-14) ergs/cm3 and u_e = (3.4 (-0.2+0.3) (-0.4+0.5)) \times 10^(-14) ergs/cm3 integrated over the electron Lorentz factor of 10^3 -- 10^5, respectively. Thus, the east lobe is found to reside in an equipartition condition between the electrons and magnetic field parametrized as u_e/u_m = 1.1 (-0.1+0.2) (-0.2+0.4). The east lobe of DA 240 is indicated to exhibit the lowest value of u_e, among all the X-ray detected lobes of radio galaxies. A comparison of the energetics in the giant radio galaxies with a size of about 1 Mpc to those in the smaller objects suggests a possibility that radio galaxies lose their jet power, as they evolve from 100 kpc to 1 Mpc.
  • The Gas Slit Camera (GSC) is an X-ray instrument on the MAXI (Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image) mission on the International Space Station. It is designed to scan the entire sky every 92-minute orbital period in the 2--30 keV band and to achieve the highest sensitivity among the X-ray all-sky monitors ever flown so far. The GSC employs large-area position-sensitive proportional counters with the total detector area of 5350 cm$^2$. The on-board data processor has functions to format telemetry data as well as to control the high voltage of the proportional counters to protect them from the particle irradiation. The paper describes the instruments, on-board data processing, telemetry data formats, and performance specifications expected from the ground calibration tests.
  • We report the in-orbit performance of the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) on the MAXI (Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image) mission carried on the International Space Station (ISS). Its commissioning operation started on August 8, 2009, confirmed the basic performances of the effective area in the energy band of 2--30 keV, the spatial resolution of the slit-and-slat collimator and detector with 1.5 degree FWHM, the source visibility of 40-150 seconds for each scan cycle, and the sky coverage of 85% per 92-minute orbital period and 95% per day. The gas gains and read-out amplifier gains have been stable within 1%. The background rate is consistent with the past X-ray experiments operated at the similar low-earth orbit if its relation with the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity is extrapolated to the high latitude. We also present the status of the in-orbit operation and the calibration of the effective area and the energy response matrix using Crab-nebula data.