• We report a method of correcting a near-infrared (0.90-1.35 $\mu$m) high-resolution ($\lambda/\Delta\lambda\sim28,000$) spectrum for telluric absorption using the corresponding spectrum of a telluric standard star. The proposed method uses an A0\,V star or its analog as a standard star from which on the order of 100 intrinsic stellar lines are carefully removed with the help of a reference synthetic telluric spectrum. We find that this method can also be applied to feature-rich objects having spectra with heavily blended intrinsic stellar and telluric lines and present an application to a G-type giant using this approach. We also develop a new diagnostic method for evaluating the accuracy of telluric correction and use it to demonstrate that our method achieves an accuracy better than 2\% for spectral parts for which the atmospheric transmittance is as low as $\sim$20\% if telluric standard stars are observed under the following conditions: (1) the difference in airmass between the target and the standard is $\lesssim 0.05$; and (2) that in time is less than 1 h. In particular, the time variability of water vapor has a large impact on the accuracy of telluric correction and minimizing the difference in time from that of the telluric standard star is important especially in near-infrared high-resolution spectroscopic observation.
  • We obtained deep near-infrared images of Sh 2-208, one of the lowest-metallicity HII regions in the Galaxy, [O/H] = -0.8 dex. We detected a young cluster in the center of the HII region with a limiting magnitude of K = 18.0 mag (10sigma), which corresponds to a mass detection limit of ~0.2 M_sun. This enables the comparison of star-forming properties under low metallicity with those of the solar neighborhood. We identified 89 cluster members. From the fitting of the K-band luminosity function (KLF), the age and distance of the cluster are estimated to be ~0.5 Myr and ~4 kpc, respectively. The estimated young age is consistent with the detection of strong CO emission in the cluster region and the estimated large extinction of cluster members (Av ~ 4--25 mag). The observed KLF suggests that the underlying initial mass function (IMF) of the low-metallicity cluster is not significantly different from canonical IMFs in the solar neighborhood in terms of both high-mass slope and IMF peak (characteristic mass). Despite the very young age, the disk fraction of the cluster is estimated at only 27pm6 %, which is significantly lower than those in the solar metallicity. Those results are similar to Sh 2-207, which is another low-metallicity star-forming region close to Sh 2-208 with a separation of 12 pc,suggesting that their star-forming activities in low-metallicity environments are essentially identical to those in the solar neighborhood, except for the disk dispersal timescale. From large-scale mid-infrared images, we suggest that sequential star formation is taking place in Sh 2-207, Sh 2-208 and the surrounding region, triggered by an expanding bubble with a ~30 pc radius.
  • We obtained the near-infrared (NIR) high-resolution ($R\equiv\lambda/\Delta\lambda\sim20,000$) spectra of the seven brightest early-type stars in the Cygnus OB2 association for investigating the environmental dependence of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). The WINERED spectrograph mounted on the Araki 1.3m telescope in Japan was used to collect data. All 20 of the known DIBs within the wavelength coverage of WINERED ($0.91<\lambda<1.36\mu$m) were clearly detected along all lines of sight because of their high flux density in the NIR wavelength range and the large extinction. The equivalent widths (EWs) of DIBs were not correlated with the column densities of C$_2$ molecules, which trace the patchy dense component, suggesting that the NIR DIB carriers are distributed mainly in the diffuse component. On the basis of the correlations among the NIR DIBs both for stars in Cyg OB2 and stars observed previously, $\lambda\lambda$10780, 10792, 11797, 12623, and 13175 are found to constitute a "family", in which the DIBs are correlated well over the wide EW range. In contrast, the EW of $\lambda$10504 is found to remain almost constant over the stars in Cyg OB2. The extinction estimated from the average EW of $\lambda$10504 ($A_V\sim3.6$mag) roughly corresponds to the lower limit of the extinction distribution of OB stars in Cyg OB2. This suggests that $\lambda$10504 is absorbed only by the foreground clouds, implying that the carrier of $\lambda$10504 is completely destroyed in Cyg OB2, probably by the strong UV radiation field. The different behaviors of the DIBs may be caused by different properties of the DIB carriers.
  • In order to investigate the Galactic-scale environmental effects on the evolution of protoplanetary disks, we explored the near-infrared (NIR) disk fraction of the Quartet cluster, which is a young cluster in the innermost Galactic disk at the Galactocentric radius Rg ~ 4 kpc. Because this cluster has a typical cluster mass of ~10^3 M_sun as opposed to very massive clusters, which have been observed in previous studies (>10^4 M_sun), we can avoid intra-cluster effects such as strong UV field from OB stars. Although the age of the Quartet is previously estimated to be 3-8 Myr old, we find that it is most likely ~3-4.5 Myr old. In moderately deep JHK images from the UKIDSS survey, we found eight HAeBe candidates in the cluster, and performed K-band medium-resolution ($R \equiv \Delta \lambda / \lambda ~ 800$) spectroscopy for three of them with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. These are found to have both Br\gamma absorption lines as well as CO bandhead emission, suggesting that they are HAeBe stars with protoplanetary disks. We estimated the intermediate-mass disk fraction (IMDF) to be ~25 % for the cluster, suggesting slightly higher IMDF compared to those for young clusters in the solar neighborhood with similar cluster age, although such conclusion should await future spectroscopic study of all candidates of cluster members.
  • To study star formation in low metallicity environments ([M/H] ~ -1 ,dex), we obtained deep near-infrared (NIR) images of Sh 2-207 (S207), which is an HII region in the outer Galaxy with spectroscopically determined metallicity of [O/H] ~= -0.8 dex. We identified a young cluster in the western region of S207 with a limiting magnitude of Ks =19.0 mag (10 sigma) that corresponds to a mass detection limit of <~0.1 M_sun and enables the comparison of star-forming properties under low metallicity with those of the solar neighborhood. From the fitting of the K-band luminosity function (KLF), the age and distance of S207 cluster are estimated at 2-3Myr and ~4 kpc, respectively. The estimated age is consistent with the suggestion of small extinctions of stars in the cluster (Av ~ 3 mag) and the non-detection of molecular clouds. The reasonably good fit between observed KLF and model KLF suggests that the underlying initial mass function (IMF) of the cluster down to the detection limit is not significantly different from the typical IMFs in the solar metallicity. From the fraction of stars with NIR excesses, a low disk fraction (<10 %) in the cluster with relatively young age is suggested, as we had previously proposed.
  • During the "WISE at 5: Legacy and Prospects" conference in Pasadena, CA -- which ran from February 10 - 12, 2015 -- attendees were invited to engage in an interactive session exploring the future uses of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. The 65 participants -- many of whom are extensive users of the data -- brainstormed the top questions still to be answered by the mission, as well as the complementary current and future datasets and additional processing of WISE/NEOWISE data that would aid in addressing these most important scientific questions. The results were mainly bifurcated between topics related to extragalactic studies (e.g. AGN, QSOs) and substellar mass objects. In summary, participants found that complementing WISE/NEOWISE data with cross-correlated multiwavelength surveys (e.g. SDSS, Pan-STARRS, LSST, Gaia, Euclid, etc.) would be highly beneficial for all future mission goals. Moreover, developing or implementing machine-learning tools to comb through and understand cross-correlated data was often mentioned for future uses. Finally, attendees agreed that additional processing of the data such as co-adding WISE and NEOWISE and extracting a multi-epoch photometric database and parallax and proper motion catalog would greatly improve the scientific results of the most important projects identified. In that respect, a project such as MaxWISE which would execute the most important additional processing and extraction as well as make the data and catalogs easily accessible via a public portal was deemed extremely important.
  • We present a comprehensive survey of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in $0.91-1.32\mu$m with a newly-developed near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph, WINERED, mounted on the Araki 1.3 m Telescope in Japan. We obtained high-resolution ($R=28,300$) spectra of 25 early-type stars with color excesses of $0.07<E(B-V)<3.4$. In addition to the five DIBs previously detected in this wavelength range, we identified 15 new DIBs, 7 of which were reported as DIB "candidates" by Cox. We analyze the correlations among NIR DIBs, strong optical DIBs, and the reddening of the stars. Consequently, we found that all NIR DIBs show weaker correlations with the reddening rather than the optical DIBs, suggesting that the equivalent widths of NIR DIBs depend on some physical conditions of the interstellar clouds, such as UV flux. Three NIR DIBs, $\lambda\lambda$10780, 10792, and 11797, are found to be classifiable as a "family," in which the DIBs are well correlated with each other, suggesting that the carriers of these DIBs are connected with some chemical reactions and/or have similar physical properties such as ionization potential. We also found that three strongest NIR DIBs $\lambda\lambda10780, 11797, 13175$ are well correlated with the optical DIB $\lambda 5780.5$, whose carrier is proposed to be a cation molecule with high ionization potential, indicating that the carriers of the NIR DIBs could be cation molecules.
  • WINERED is a newly built high-efficiency (throughput$ > 25-30\%$) and high-resolution spectrograph customized for short NIR bands at 0.9-1.35 ${\rm \mu}$m. WINERED is equipped with ambient temperature optics and a cryogenic camera using a 1.7 ${\rm \mu}$m cut-off HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG array detector. WINERED has two grating modes: one with a conventional reflective echelle grating (R$\sim$28,300), which covers 0.9-1.35 $\mu$m simultaneously, the other with ZnSe or ZnS immersion grating (R$\sim$100,000). We have completed the development of WINERED except for the immersion grating, and started engineering and science observations at the Nasmyth platform of the 1.3 m Araki Telescope at Koyama Astronomical Observatory of Kyoto-Sangyo University in Japan. We confirmed that the spectral resolution ($R\sim$ 28,300) and the throughput ($>$ 40\% w/o telescope/atmosphere/array QE) meet our specifications. We measured ambient thermal backgrounds (e.g., 0.06 ${\rm [e^{-}/sec/pixel]}$ at 287 K), which are roughly consistent with that we expected. WINERED is a portable instrument that can be installed at any telescope with Nasmyth focus as a PI-type instrument. If WINERED is installed on a 10 meter telescope, the limiting magnitude is expected to be J=18-19, which can provide high-resolution spectra with high quality even for faint distant objects.
  • We report the discovery of star formation activity in perhaps the most distant molecular cloud in the extreme outer galaxy. We performed deep near infrared imaging with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope, and found two young embedded clusters at two CO peaks of Digel Cloud 1 at the kinematic distance of D = 16 kpc (Galactocentric radius RG = 22 kpc). We identified 18 and 45 cluster members in the two peaks, and the estimated stellar density are ~ 5 and ~ 3 pc^-2, respectively. The observed K-band luminosity function suggests that the age of the clusters is less than 1 Myr and also the distance to the clusters is consistent with the kinematic distance. On the sky, Cloud 1 is located very close to the H I peak of high-velocity cloud (HVC) Complex H, and there are some H I intermediate velocity structures between the Complex H and the Galactic disk, which could indicate an interaction between them. We suggest possibility that Complex H impacting on the Galactic disk has triggered star formation in Cloud 1 as well as the formation of Cloud 1 molecular cloud.