• We extend previously proposed measures of complexity, emergence, and self-organization to continuous distributions using differential entropy. This allows us to calculate the complexity of phenomena for which distributions are known. We find that a broad range of common parameters found in Gaussian and scale-free distributions present high complexity values. We also explore the relationship between our measure of complexity and information adaptation.
  • This thesis presents the theoretical, conceptual and methodological aspects that support the modeling of dynamical systems (DS) by using several agents. The modeling approach permits the assessment of properties representing order, change, equilibrium, adaptability, and autonomy, in DS. The modeling processes were supported by a conceptual corpus regarding systems dynamics, multi-agent systems, graph theory, and, particularly, the information theory. Besides to the specification of the dynamical systems as a computational network of agents, metrics that allow characterizing and assessing the inherent complexity of such systems were defined. As a result, properties associated with emergence, self-organization, complexity, homeostasis and autopoiesis were defined, formalized and measured. The validation of the underlying DS model was carried out on discrete systems (boolean networks and cellular automata) and ecological systems. The central contribution of this thesis was the development of a methodological approach for DS modeling. This approach includes a larger set of properties than in traditional studies, what allows us to deepen in questioning essential issues associated with the DS field. All this was achieved from a simple base of calculation and interpretation, which does not require advanced mathematical knowledge, and facilitates their application in different fields of science.
  • We apply measures of complexity, emergence and self-organization to an abstract city traffic model for comparing a traditional traffic coordination method with a self-organizing method in two scenarios: cyclic boundaries and non-orientable boundaries. We show that the measures are useful to identify and characterize different dynamical phases. It becomes clear that different operation regimes are required for different traffic demands. Thus, not only traffic is a non-stationary problem, which requires controllers to adapt constantly. Controllers must also change drastically the complexity of their behavior depending on the demand. Based on our measures, we can say that the self-organizing method achieves an adaptability level comparable to a living system.
  • This chapter reviews measures of emergence, self-organization, complexity, homeostasis, and autopoiesis based on information theory. These measures are derived from proposed axioms and tested in two case studies: random Boolean networks and an Arctic lake ecosystem. Emergence is defined as the information a system or process produces. Self-organization is defined as the opposite of emergence, while complexity is defined as the balance between emergence and self-organization. Homeostasis reflects the stability of a system. Autopoiesis is defined as the ratio between the complexity of a system and the complexity of its environment. The proposed measures can be applied at different scales, which can be studied with multi-scale profiles.
  • We apply formal measures of emergence, self-organization, homeostasis, autopoiesis and complexity to an aquatic ecosystem; in particular to the physiochemical component of an Arctic lake. These measures are based on information theory. Variables with an homogeneous distribution have higher values of emergence, while variables with a more heterogeneous distribution have a higher self-organization. Variables with a high complexity reflect a balance between change (emergence) and regularity/order (self-organization). In addition, homeostasis values coincide with the variation of the winter and summer seasons. Autopoiesis values show a higher degree of independence of biological components over their environment. Our approach shows how the ecological dynamics can be described in terms of information.
  • Concepts used in the scientific study of complex systems have become so widespread that their use and abuse has led to ambiguity and confusion in their meaning. In this paper we use information theory to provide abstract and concise measures of complexity, emergence, self-organization, and homeostasis. The purpose is to clarify the meaning of these concepts with the aid of the proposed formal measures. In a simplified version of the measures (focusing on the information produced by a system), emergence becomes the opposite of self-organization, while complexity represents their balance. Homeostasis can be seen as a measure of the stability of the system. We use computational experiments on random Boolean networks and elementary cellular automata to illustrate our measures at multiple scales.