• In physics, biology and engineering, network systems abound. How does the connectivity of a network system combine with the behavior of its individual components to determine its collective function? We approach this question for networks with linear time-invariant dynamics by relating internal network feedbacks to the statistical prevalence of connectivity motifs, a set of surprisingly simple and local statistics of connectivity. This results in a reduced order model of the network input-output dynamics in terms of motifs structures. As an example, the new formulation dramatically simplifies the classic Erdos-Renyi graph, reducing the overall network behavior to one proportional feedback wrapped around the dynamics of a single node. For general networks, higher-order motifs systematically provide further layers and types of feedback to regulate the network response. Thus, the local connectivity shapes temporal and spectral processing by the network as a whole, and we show how this enables robust, yet tunable, functionality such as extending the time constant with which networks remember past signals. The theory also extends to networks composed from heterogeneous nodes with distinct dynamics and connectivity, and patterned input to (and readout from) subsets of nodes. These statistical descriptions provide a powerful theoretical framework to understand the functionality of real-world network systems, as we illustrate with examples including the mouse brain connectome.
  • Stimulus from the environment that guides behavior and informs decisions is encoded in the firing rates of neural populations. Each neuron in the populations, however, does not spike independently: spike events are correlated from cell to cell. To what degree does this apparent redundancy impact the accuracy with which decisions can be made, and the computations that are required to optimally decide? We explore these questions for two illustrative models of correlation among cells. Each model is statistically identical at the level of pairs cells, but differs in higher-order statistics that describe the simultaneous activity of larger cell groups. We find that the presence of correlations can diminish the performance attained by an ideal decision maker to either a small or large extent, depending on the nature of the higher-order interactions. Moreover, while this optimal performance can in some cases be obtained via the standard integration-to-bound operation, in others it requires a nonlinear computation on incoming spikes. Overall, we conclude that a given level of pairwise correlations--even when restricted to identical neural populations--may not always indicate redundancies that diminish decision making performance.
  • A key step in many perceptual decision tasks is the integration of sensory inputs over time, but fundamental questions remain about how this is accomplished in neural circuits. One possibility is to balance decay modes of membranes and synapses with recurrent excitation. To allow integration over long timescales, however, this balance must be precise; this is known as the fine tuning problem. The need for fine tuning can be overcome via a ratchet-like mechanism, in which momentary inputs must be above a preset limit to be registered by the circuit. The degree of this ratcheting embodies a tradeoff between sensitivity to the input stream and robustness against parameter mistuning. The goal of our study is to analyze the consequences of this tradeoff for decision making performance. For concreteness, we focus on the well-studied random dot motion discrimination task. For stimulus parameters constrained by experimental data, we find that loss of sensitivity to inputs has surprisingly little cost for decision performance. This leads robust integrators to performance gains when feedback becomes mistuned. Moreover, we find that substantially robust and mistuned integrator models remain consistent with chronometric and accuracy functions found in experiments. We explain our findings via sequential analysis of the momentary and integrated signals, and discuss their implication: robust integrators may be surprisingly well-suited to subserve the basic function of evidence integration in many cognitive tasks.