• We report the first detection of linearly polarized emission at an observing wavelength of 350 $\mu$m from the radio-loud Active Galactic Nucleus 3C 279. We conducted polarization observations for 3C 279 using the SHARP polarimeter in the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on 2014 March 13 and 14. For the first time, we detected the linear polarization with the degree of polarization of 13.3\%$\pm$3.4\% ($3.9\sigma$) and the Electric Vector Position Angle (EVPA) of 34.7$^\circ\pm5.6^\circ$. We also observed 3C~279 simultaneously at 13, 7, and 3.5 mm in dual polarization with the Korean very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) Network on 2014 March 6 (single dish) and imaged in milliarcsecond (mas) scales at 13, 7, 3.5, and 2.3 mm on March 22 (VLBI). We found that the degree of linear polarization increases from 10\% to 13\% at 13 mm to 350 $\mu$m and the EVPAs at all observing frequencies are parallel within $<10^\circ$ to the direction of the jet at mas scale, implying that the integrated magnetic fields are perpendicular to the jet in the innermost regions. We also found that the Faraday rotation measures RM are in a range of $-6.5\times10^2 \sim -2.7\times10^3$ rad m$^{-2}$ between 13 and 3.5 mm, and are scaled as a function of wavelength: $|{\rm RM}|\propto\lambda^{-2.2}$. These results indicate that the mm and sub-mm polarization emission are generated in the compact jet within 1~mas scale and affected by a Faraday screen in or in the close proximity of the jet.
  • We report on Submillimeter Array observations of the 870 micron continuum and CO(3-2), 13CO(2-1) and C18O(2-1) line emission of a faint object, SMM2E, near the driving source of the HH797 outflow in the IC348 cluster. The continuum emission shows an unresolved source for which we estimate a mass of gas and dust of 30 Mjup, and the CO(3-2) line reveals a compact bipolar outflow centred on SMM2E, and barely seen also in 13CO(2-1). In addition, C18O(2-1) emission reveals hints of a possible rotating envelope/disk perpendicular to the outflow, for which we infer a dynamical mass of ~16 Mjup. In order to further constrain the accreted mass of the object, we gathered data from Spitzer, Herschel, and new and archive submillimetre observations, and built the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED). The SED can be fitted with one single modified black-body from 70 micron down to 2.1 cm, using a dust temperature of ~24 K, a dust emissivity index of 0.8, and an envelope mass of ~35 Mjup. The bolometric luminosity is 0.10 Lsun, and the bolometric temperature is 35 K. Thus, SMM2E is comparable to the known Class 0 objects in the stellar domain. An estimate of the final mass indicates that SMM2E will most likely remain substellar, and the SMM2E outflow force matches the trend with luminosity known for young stellar objects. Thus, SMM2E constitutes an excellent example of a Class 0 proto-brown dwarf candidate which forms as a scaled-down version of low-mass stars. Finally, SMM2E seems to be part of a wide (~2400 AU) multiple system of Class 0 sources.
  • We present a high-resolution $1.5"$ observational study towards two massive dust-and-gas cores, ORI8nw\_2 and ORI2\_6 in Orion Molecular Cloud using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). In both regions the 3.2 mm continuum emission reveals a dense and compact dust core of 1 to 3 solar masses. The cores are estimated to have number densities more than $10^9$ cm$^{-3}$, which are among the highest volume density ever published for the star-forming cores. In both regions the ${\rm N_2H^+}$ shows multiple gas clumps which are spatially displaced from the dense gas traced by the 3.2 mm continuum as well as the ${\rm HCO^+}$. The ${\rm N_2H^+}$ clumps in ORI8nw\_2 are gravitationally unbound. The clumps have masses comparable to the thermal Jeans mass, and are separated with intervals comparable with the Jeans length, thus likely result from thermal Jeans fragmentation. The fragmentation may have prohibited the high-mass star formation in the two cores which originally have larger total masses. In both regions the abundance ratio of ${\rm [N_2H^+]/[HCO^+]}$ appears to be higher than those in infrared dark clouds as a result of CO depletion. The extreme high central density in these Orion cores implies a very small Jeans scale ($<500$ AU). To further reveal the evolution of such dense cores requires higher resolution and sensitivity.
  • We present the first detection of polarization around the Class 0 low-mass protostar L1157-mm at two different wavelengths. We show polarimetric maps at large scales (10" resolution at 350 um) from the SHARC-II Polarimeter and at smaller scales (1.2"-4.5" at 1.3 mm) from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The observations are consistent with each other and show inferred magnetic field lines aligned with the outflow. The CARMA observations suggest a full hourglass magnetic field morphology centered about the core; this is only the second well-defined hourglass detected around a low-mass protostar to date. We apply two different methods to CARMA polarimetric observations to estimate the plane-of-sky magnetic field magnitude, finding values of 1.4 and 3.4 mG.
  • We present 3.6 to 70 {\mu}m Spitzer photometry of 154 weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTS) in the Chamaeleon, Lupus, Ophiuchus and Taurus star formation regions, all of which are within 200 pc of the Sun. For a comparative study, we also include 33 classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) which are located in the same star forming regions. Spitzer sensitivities allow us to robustly detect the photosphere in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8 {\mu}m) and the 24 {\mu}m MIPS band. In the 70 {\mu}m MIPS band, we are able to detect dust emission brighter than roughly 40 times the photosphere. These observations represent the most sensitive WTTS survey in the mid to far infrared to date, and reveal the frequency of outer disks (r = 3-50 AU) around WTTS. The 70 {\mu}m photometry for half the c2d WTTS sample (the on-cloud objects), which were not included in the earlier papers in this series, Padgett et al. (2006) and Cieza et al. (2007), are presented here for the first time. We find a disk frequency of 19% for on-cloud WTTS, but just 5% for off- cloud WTTS, similar to the value reported in the earlier works. WTTS exhibit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that are quite diverse, spanning the range from optically thick to optically thin disks. Most disks become more tenuous than Ldisk/L* = 2 x 10^-3 in 2 Myr, and more tenuous than Ldisk/L* = 5 x 10^-4 in 4 Myr.
  • (abridged) We report a study of the relation between dust and gas over a 100deg^2 area in the Taurus molecular cloud. We compare the H2 column density derived from dust extinction with the CO column density derived from the 12CO and 13CO J= 1-0 lines. We derive the visual extinction from reddening determined from 2MASS data. The comparison is done at an angular size of 200", corresponding to 0.14pc at a distance of 140pc. We find that the relation between visual extinction Av and N(CO) is linear between Av~3 and 10 mag in the region associated with the B213--L1495 filament. In other regions the linear relation is flattened for Av > 4 mag. We find that the presence of temperature gradients in the molecular gas affects the determination of N(CO) by ~30--70% with the largest difference occurring at large column densities. Adding a correction for this effect and accounting for the observed relation between the column density of CO and CO2 ices and Av, we find a linear relationship between the column of carbon monoxide and dust for observed visual extinctions up to the maximum value in our data 23mag. We have used these data to study a sample of dense cores in Taurus. Fitting an analytical column density profile to these cores we derive an average volume density of about 1.4e4 cm^-3 and a CO depletion age of about 4.2e5 years. We estimate the H2 mass of Taurus to be about 1.5e4 M_sun, independently derived from the Av and N(CO) maps. We derive a CO integrated intensity to H2 conversion factor of about 2.1e20 cm^-2 (K km/s)^-1, which applies even in the region where the [CO]/[H_2] ratio is reduced by up to two orders of magnitude. The distribution of column densities in our Taurus maps resembles a log--normal function but shows tails at large and low column densities.
  • We present c2d Spitzer/IRAC observations of the Lupus I, III and IV dark clouds and discuss them in combination with optical and near-infrared and c2d MIPS data. With the Spitzer data, the new sample contains 159 stars, 4 times larger than the previous one. It is dominated by low- and very-low mass stars and it is complete down to M $\approx$ 0.1M$_\odot$. We find 30-40 % binaries with separations between 100 to 2000 AU with no apparent effect in the disk properties of the members. A large majority of the objects are Class II or Class III objects, with only 20 (12%) of Class I or Flat spectrum sources. The disk sample is complete down to ``debris''-like systems in stars as small as M $\approx$ 0.2 M$_\odot$ and includes sub-stellar objects with larger IR excesses. The disk fraction in Lupus is 70 -- 80%, consistent with an age of 1 -- 2 Myr. However, the young population contains 20% optically thick accretion disks and 40% relatively less flared disks. A growing variety of inner disk structures is found for larger inner disk clearings for equal disk masses. Lupus III is the most centrally populated and rich, followed by Lupus I with a filamentary structure and by Lupus IV, where a very high density core with little star-formation activity has been found. We estimate star formation rates in Lupus of 2 -- 10 M$_\odot$ Myr$^{-1}$ and star formation efficiencies of a few percent, apparently correlated with the associated cloud masses.
  • We discuss the results of the optical spectroscopic follow-up of pre-main sequence (PMS) objects and candidates selected in the Chamaeleon II dark cloud based on data from the Spitzer Legacy survey "From Molecular Cores to Planet Forming Disks" (c2d) and from previous surveys. Our sample includes both objects with infrared excess selected according to c2d criteria and referred to as Young Stellar Objects and other cloud members and candidates selected from complementary optical and near-infrared data. We characterize the sample of objects by deriving their physical parameters. The vast majority of objects have masses < 1 solar mass and ages < 6 Myr. Several of the PMS objects and candidates lie very close to or below the Hydrogen-burning limit. A first estimate of the slope of the Initial Mass Function in Cha II is consistent with that of other T associations. The star formation efficiency in the cloud (1-4%) is consistent with our own estimates for Taurus and Lupus, but significantly lower than for Cha I. This might mean that different star-formation activities in the Chamaeleon clouds may reflect a different history of star formation. We also find that the Cha II cloud is turning some 8 solar masses into stars every Myr, which is less than the star formation rate in the other c2d clouds. However, the star formation rate is not steady and evidence is found that the star formation in Cha II might have occurred very rapidly. The H_alpha emission of the Cha II PMS objects, as well as possible correlations between their stellar and disk properties, are also investigated.
  • We discuss the results from the combined IRAC and MIPS c2d Spitzer Legacy survey observations and complementary optical and near infrared data of the Chamaeleon II (Cha II) dark cloud. We perform a census of the young population of Cha II, in a mapped area of ~1.75 square degrees, and study the spatial distribution and properties of the cloud members and candidate pre-main sequence (PMS) objects and their circumstellar matter. From the analysis of the volume density of the PMS objects and candidates we find two tight groups of objects with volume densities higher than 25 solar masses per cubic parsec and 5-10 members each. These groups correlate well in space with the regions of high extinction. A multiplicity fraction of about 13% is observed for objects with separations between 0.8" and 6.0". Using the results of masses and ages from a companion paper, we estimate the star formation efficiency to be 1-4% significantly lower than for Cha I. This might mean that different star-formation activities in the Chamaeleon clouds reflect a different history of star formation. We also find that the Cha II cloud is turning some 6-7 solar masses into stars every Myr, which is low in comparison with the star formation rate in other c2d clouds. On the other hand, the disk fraction of 70-80% that we estimate in Cha II is much higher than in other star forming regions and indicates that the population in this cloud is dominated by objects with active accretion. Finally, the Cha II outflows are discussed, with particular regard to the discovery of a new Herbig-Haro outflow, HH 939, driven by the classical T Tauri star Sz 50.
  • One of the central goals of the Spitzer Legacy Project ``From Molecular Cores to Planet-forming Disks'' (c2d) is to determine the frequency of remnant circumstellar disks around weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTs) and to study the properties and evolutionary status of these disks. Here we present a census of disks for a sample of over 230 spectroscopically identified wTTs located in the c2d IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 4.8, and 8.0 um) and MIPS (24 um) maps of the Ophiuchus, Lupus, and Perseus Molecular Clouds. We find that ~20% of the wTTs in a magnitude limited subsample have noticeable IR-excesses at IRAC wavelengths indicating the presence of a circumstellar disk. The disk frequencies we find in these 3 regions are ~3-6 times larger than that recently found for a sample of 83 relatively isolated wTTs located, for the most part, outside the highest extinction regions covered by the c2d IRAC and MIPS maps. The disk fractions we find are more consistent with those obtained in recent Spitzer studies of wTTs in young clusters such as IC 348 and Tr 37. From their location in the H-R diagram, we find that, in our sample, the wTTs with excesses are among the younger part of the age distribution. Still, up to ~50% of the apparently youngest stars in the sample show no evidence of IR excess, suggesting that the circumstellar disks of a sizable fraction of pre-main-sequence stars dissipate in a timescale of ~1 Myr. We also find that none of the stars in our sample apparently older than ~10 Myrs have detectable circumstellar disks at wavelengths < 24 um. Also, we find that the wTTs disks in our sample exhibit a wide range of properties (SED morphology, inner radius, L_DISK/L*, etc) which bridge the gaps observed between the cTTs and the debris disk regimes.
  • We discuss the results from the combined IRAC and MIPS c2d Spitzer Legacy observations of the Serpens star-forming region. In particular we present a set of criteria for isolating bona fide young stellar objects, YSO's, from the extensive background contamination by extra-galactic objects. We then discuss the properties of the resulting high confidence set of YSO's. We find 235 such objects in the 0.85 deg^2 field that was covered with both IRAC and MIPS. An additional set of 51 lower confidence YSO's outside this area is identified from the MIPS data combined with 2MASS photometry. We describe two sets of results, color-color diagrams to compare our observed source properties with those of theoretical models for star/disk/envelope systems and our own modeling of the subset of our objects that appear to be star+disks. These objects exhibit a very wide range of disk properties, from many that can be fit with actively accreting disks to some with both passive disks and even possibly debris disks. We find that the luminosity function of YSO's in Serpens extends down to at least a few x .001 Lsun or lower for an assumed distance of 260 pc. The lower limit may be set by our inability to distinguish YSO's from extra-galactic sources more than by the lack of YSO's at very low luminosities. A spatial clustering analysis shows that the nominally less-evolved YSO's are more highly clustered than the later stages and that the background extra-galactic population can be fit by the same two-point correlation function as seen in other extra-galactic studies. We also present a table of matches between several previous infrared and X-ray studies of the Serpens YSO population and our Spitzer data set.
  • We present maps of 1.5 square degrees of the Serpens dark cloud at 24, 70, and 160\micron observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS Camera. More than 2400 compact sources have been extracted at 24um, nearly 100 at 70um, and 4 at 160um. We estimate completeness limits for our 24um survey from Monte Carlo tests with artificial sources inserted into the Spitzer maps. We compare source counts, colors, and magnitudes in the Serpens cloud to two reference data sets, a 0.50 deg^2 set on a low-extinction region near the dark cloud, and a 5.3 deg^2 subset of the SWIRE ELAIS N1 data that was processed through our pipeline. These results show that there is an easily identifiable population of young stellar object candidates in the Serpens Cloud that is not present in either of the reference data sets. We also show a comparison of visual extinction and cool dust emission illustrating a close correlation between the two, and find that the most embedded YSO candidates are located in the areas of highest visual extinction.
  • We present IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron) observations of the Chamaeleon II molecular cloud. The observed area covers about 1 square degree defined by $A_V >2$. Analysis of the data in the 2005 c2d catalogs reveals a small number of sources (40) with properties similar to those of young stellaror substellar objects (YSOs). The surface density of these YSO candidates is low, and contamination by background galaxies appears to be substantial, especially for sources classified as Class I or flat SED. We discuss this problem in some detail and conclude that very few of the candidate YSOs in early evolutionary stages are actually in the Cha II cloud. Using a refined set of criteria, we define a smaller, but more reliable, set of 24 YSO candidates.
  • Infrared images of the dark cloud core B59 were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the "Cores to Disks" Legacy Science project. Photometry from 3.6-70 microns indicates at least 20 candidate low-mass young stars near the core, more than doubling the previously known population. Out of this group, 13 are located within about 0.1 pc in projection of the molecular gas peak, where a new embedded source is detected. Spectral energy distributions span the range from small excesses above photospheric levels to rising in the mid-infrared. One other embedded object, probably associated with the millimeter source B59-MMS1, with a bolometric luminosity L(bol) roughly 2 L(sun), has extended structure at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, possibly tracing the edges of an outflow cavity. The measured extinction through the central part of the core is A(V) greater than of order 45 mag. The B59 core is producing young stars with a high efficiency.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the "evolved starless core" L1521F which reveal the presence of a very low luminosity object (L < 0.07 Lsun). The object, L1521F-IRS, is directly detected at mid-infrared wavelengths (>5 micron) but only in scattered light at shorter infrared wavelengths, showing a bipolar nebula oriented east-west which is probably tracing an outflow cavity. The nebula strongly suggests that L1521F-IRS is embedded in the L1521F core. Thus L1521F-IRS is similar to the recently discovered L1014-IRS and the previously known IRAM 04191 in its substellar luminosity and dense core environment. However these objects differ significantly in their core density, core chemistry, and outflow properties, and some may be destined to be brown dwarfs rather than stars.
  • We present observations of 3.86 sq. deg. of the Perseus molecular cloud complex with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The maps show strong extended emission arising from shocked H2 in outflows in the region and from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. More than 120,000 sources are extracted toward the cloud. Based on their IRAC colors and comparison to off-cloud and extragalactic fields, we identify 400 candidate young stellar objects. About two thirds of these are associated with the young clusters IC348 and NGC1333, while the last third is distributed over the remaining cloud. We classify the young stellar objects according to the traditional scheme based on the slope of their spectral energy distributions. Significant differences are found for the numbers of embedded Class I objects relative to more evolved Class II objects in IC348, NGC1333 and the remaining cloud with the embedded Class I and "flat spectrum" YSOs constituting 14%, 36% and 47% of the total number of YSOs identified in each of these regions. The high number of Class I objects in the extended cloud (61% of the Class I objects in the entire cloud) suggests that a significant fraction of the current star formation is occuring outside the two main clusters. Finally we discuss a number of outflows and identify their driving sources, including the known deeply embedded Class 0 sources outside the two major clusters. The Class 0 objects are found to be detected by Spitzer and have very red [3.6]-[4.5] colors but do not show similarly red [5.8]-[8.0] colors. The Class 0 objects are easily identifiable in color-color diagrams plotting these two colors but are problematic to extract automatically due to the extended emission from shocked gas or scattered light in cavities related to the associated outflows.