• In this paper, a regularization of Wasserstein barycenters for random measures supported on $\mathbb{R}^{d}$ is introduced via convex penalization. The existence and uniqueness of such barycenters is first proved for a large class of penalization functions. The Bregman divergence associated to the penalization term is then considered to obtain a stability result on penalized barycenters. This allows the comparison of data made of $n$ absolutely continuous probability measures, within the more realistic setting where one only has access to a dataset of random variables sampled from unknown distributions. The convergence of the penalized empirical barycenter of a set of $n$ iid random probability measures towards its population counterpart is finally analyzed. This approach is shown to be appropriate for the statistical analysis of either discrete or absolutely continuous random measures. It also allows to construct, from a set of discrete measures, consistent estimators of population Wasserstein barycenters that are absolutely continuous.
  • This paper presents a unified framework for smooth convex regularization of discrete optimal transport problems. In this context, the regularized optimal transport turns out to be equivalent to a matrix nearness problem with respect to Bregman divergences. Our framework thus naturally generalizes a previously proposed regularization based on the Boltzmann-Shannon entropy related to the Kullback-Leibler divergence, and solved with the Sinkhorn-Knopp algorithm. We call the regularized optimal transport distance the rot mover's distance in reference to the classical earth mover's distance. We develop two generic schemes that we respectively call the alternate scaling algorithm and the non-negative alternate scaling algorithm, to compute efficiently the regularized optimal plans depending on whether the domain of the regularizer lies within the non-negative orthant or not. These schemes are based on Dykstra's algorithm with alternate Bregman projections, and further exploit the Newton-Raphson method when applied to separable divergences. We enhance the separable case with a sparse extension to deal with high data dimensions. We also instantiate our proposed framework and discuss the inherent specificities for well-known regularizers and statistical divergences in the machine learning and information geometry communities. Finally, we demonstrate the merits of our methods with experiments using synthetic data to illustrate the effect of different regularizers and penalties on the solutions, as well as real-world data for a pattern recognition application to audio scene classification.
  • We present a framework to simultaneously align and smooth data in the form of multiple point clouds sampled from unknown densities with support in a d-dimensional Euclidean space. This work is motivated by applications in bio-informatics where researchers aim to automatically normalize large datasets to compare and analyze characteristics within a same cell population. Inconveniently, the information acquired is noisy due to mis-alignment caused by technical variations of the environment. To overcome this problem, we propose to register multiple point clouds by using the notion of regularized barycenter (or Fr\'echet mean) of a set of probability measures with respect to the Wasserstein metric which allows to smooth such data and to remove mis-alignment effect in the sample acquisition process. A first approach consists in penalizing a Wasserstein barycenter with a convex functional as recently proposed in Bigot and al. (2018). A second strategy is to modify the Wasserstein metric itself by using an entropically regularized transportation cost between probability measures as introduced in Cuturi (2013). The main contribution of this work is to propound data-driven choices for the regularization parameters involved in each approach using the Goldenshluger-Lepski's principle. Simulated data sampled from Gaussian mixtures are used to illustrate each method, and an application to the analysis of flow cytometry data is finally proposed.
  • This paper is concerned by the statistical analysis of data sets whose elements are random histograms. For the purpose of learning principal modes of variation from such data, we consider the issue of computing the PCA of histograms with respect to the 2-Wasserstein distance between probability measures. To this end, we propose to compare the methods of log-PCA and geodesic PCA in the Wasserstein space as introduced by Bigot et al. (2015) and Seguy and Cuturi (2015). Geodesic PCA involves solving a non-convex optimization problem. To solve it approximately, we propose a novel forward-backward algorithm. This allows a detailed comparison between log-PCA and geodesic PCA of one-dimensional histograms, which we carry out using various data sets, and stress the benefits and drawbacks of each method. We extend these results for two-dimensional data and compare both methods in that setting.
  • We investigate in this work a versatile convex framework for multiple image segmentation, relying on the regularized optimal mass transport theory. In this setting, several transport cost functions are considered and used to match statistical distributions of features. In practice, global multidimensional histograms are estimated from the segmented image regions, and are compared to referring models that are either fixed histograms given a priori, or directly inferred in the non-supervised case. The different convex problems studied are solved efficiently using primal-dual algorithms. The proposed approach is generic and enables multi-phase segmentation as well as co-segmentation of multiple images.
  • This work is about the use of regularized optimal-transport distances for convex, histogram-based image segmentation. In the considered framework, fixed exemplar histograms define a prior on the statistical features of the two regions in competition. In this paper, we investigate the use of various transport-based cost functions as discrepancy measures and rely on a primal-dual algorithm to solve the obtained convex optimization problem.
  • This article reviews the use of first order convex optimization schemes to solve the discretized dynamic optimal transport problem, initially proposed by Benamou and Brenier. We develop a staggered grid discretization that is well adapted to the computation of the $L^2$ optimal transport geodesic between distributions defined on a uniform spatial grid. We show how proximal splitting schemes can be used to solve the resulting large scale convex optimization problem. A specific instantiation of this method on a centered grid corresponds to the initial algorithm developed by Benamou and Brenier. We also show how more general cost functions can be taken into account and how to extend the method to perform optimal transport on a Riemannian manifold.
  • This article introduces a generalization of the discrete optimal transport, with applications to color image manipulations. This new formulation includes a relaxation of the mass conservation constraint and a regularization term. These two features are crucial for image processing tasks, which necessitate to take into account families of multimodal histograms, with large mass variation across modes. The corresponding relaxed and regularized transportation problem is the solution of a convex optimization problem. Depending on the regularization used, this minimization can be solved using standard linear programming methods or first order proximal splitting schemes. The resulting transportation plan can be used as a color transfer map, which is robust to mass variation across images color palettes. Furthermore, the regularization of the transport plan helps to remove colorization artifacts due to noise amplification. We also extend this framework to the computation of barycenters of distributions. The barycenter is the solution of an optimization problem, which is separately convex with respect to the barycenter and the transportation plans, but not jointly convex. A block coordinate descent scheme converges to a stationary point of the energy. We show that the resulting algorithm can be used for color normalization across several images. The relaxed and regularized barycenter defines a common color palette for those images. Applying color transfer toward this average palette performs a color normalization of the input images.