• We present a study of close white dwarf and M dwarf (WD+dM) binary systems and examine the effect that a close companion has on the magnetic field generation in M dwarfs. We use a base sample of 1602 white dwarf -- main sequence binaries from Rebassa et al. to develop a set of color cuts in GALEX, SDSS, UKIDSS, and 2MASS color space to construct a sample of 1756 WD+dM high-quality pairs from the SDSS DR8 spectroscopic database. We separate the individual WD and dM from each spectrum using an iterative technique that compares the WD and dM components to best-fit templates. Using the absolute height above the Galactic plane as a proxy for age, and the H{\alpha} emission line as an indicator for magnetic activity, we investigate the age-activity relation for our sample for spectral types \leqM7. Our results show that early-type M dwarfs (\leqM4) in close binary systems are more likely to be active and have longer activity lifetimes compared to their field counterparts. However, at a spectral type of M5 (just past the onset of full convection in M dwarfs), the activity fraction and lifetimes of WD+dM binary systems becomes more comparable to that of the field M dwarfs. One of the implications of having a close binary companion is presumed to be increased stellar rotation through disk-disruption, tidal effects, or angular momentum exchange. Thus, we interpret the similarity in activity behavior between late-type dMs in WD+dM pairs and late-type field dMs to be due to a decrease in sensitivity in close binary companions (or stellar rotation), which has implications for the nature of magnetic activity in fully-convective stars. (Abridged)
  • We present a new sample of $K$-band spectral observations for CVs: non-magnetic and magnetic as well as present day and pre CVs. The purpose of this diverse sample is to address the recent claim that the secondary stars in dwarf novae are carbon deficient, having become so through a far more evolved evolution than the current paradigm predicts. Our new observations, along with previous literature results, span a wide range of orbital period and CV type. In general, dwarf novae in which the secondary star is seen show weak to no CO absorption while polar and pre-CV donor stars appear to have normal CO absorption for their spectral type. However, this is not universal. The presence of normal looking CO absorption in the dwarf nova SS Aur and the hibernating CV QS Vir and a complete lack of CO absorption in the long period polar V1309 Ori cloud the issue. A summary of the literature pointing to non-solar abundances including enhanced NV/CIV ratios is presented. It appears that some CVs have non-solar abundance material accreting onto the white dwarf suggesting an evolved secondary star while for others CO emission in the accretion disk may play a role. However, the exact mechanism or combination of factors causing the CO absorption anomaly in CVs is not yet clear.
  • We have conducted a search for pulsar companions to 15 low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs; M < 0.4 M_Sun) at 820 MHz with the NRAO Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These LMWDs were spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and do not show the photometric excess or spectroscopic signature associated with a companion in their discovery data. However, LMWDs are believed to evolve in binary systems and to have either a more massive WD or a neutron star as a companion. Indeed, evolutionary models of low-mass X-ray binaries, the precursors of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), produce significant numbers of LMWDs (e.g., Benvenuto & De Vito 2005), suggesting that the SDSS LMWDs may have neutron star companions. No convincing pulsar signal is detected in our data. This is consistent with the findings of van Leeuwen et al. (2007), who conducted a GBT search for radio pulsations at 340 MHz from unseen companions to eight SDSS WDs (five are still considered LMWDs; the three others are now classified as "ordinary" WDs). We discuss the constraints our non-detections place on the probability P_MSP that the companion to a given LMWD is a radio pulsar in the context of the luminosity and acceleration limits of our search; we find that P_MSP < 10 +4 -2 %.
  • We have developed an end-to-end photometric data processing pipeline to compare current photometric algorithms commonly used on ground-based imaging data. This testbed is exceedingly adaptable, and enables us to perform many research and development tasks, including image subtraction and co-addition, object detection and measurements, the production of photometric catalogs, and the creation and stocking of database tables with time-series information. This testing has been undertaken to evaluate existing photometry algorithms for consideration by a next-generation image processing pipeline for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We outline the results of our tests for four packages: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey's (SDSS) Photo package, Daophot and Allframe, DoPhot, and two versions of Source Extractor (SExtractor). The ability of these algorithms to perform point-source photometry, astrometry, shape measurements, star-galaxy separation, and to measure objects at low signal-to-noise is quantified. We also perform a detailed crowded field comparison of Daophot and Allframe, and profile the speed and memory requirements in detail for SExtractor. We find that both Daophot and Photo are able to perform aperture photometry to high enough precision to meet LSST's science requirements, and less adequately at PSF-fitting photometry. Photo performs the best at simultaneous point and extended-source shape and brightness measurements. SExtractor is the fastest algorithm, and recent upgrades in the software yield high-quality centroid and shape measurements with little bias towards faint magnitudes. Allframe yields the best photometric results in crowded fields.
  • We present the latest catalog of more than 1200 spectroscopically-selected close binary systems observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey through Data Release Five. We use the catalog to search for magnetic white dwarfs in cataclysmic variable progenitor systems. Given that approximately 25% of cataclysmic variables contain a magnetic white dwarf, and that our large sample of close binary systems should contain many progenitors of cataclysmic variables, it is quite surprising that we find only two potential magnetic white dwarfs in this sample. The candidate magnetic white dwarfs, if confirmed, would possess relatively low magnetic field strengths (B_WD < 10 MG) that are similar to those of intermediate-Polars but are much less than the average field strength of the current Polar population. Additional observations of these systems are required to definitively cast the white dwarfs as magnetic. Even if these two systems prove to be the first evidence of detached magnetic white dwarf + M dwarf binaries, there is still a large disparity between the properties of the presently known cataclysmic variable population and the presumed close binary progenitors.
  • We present a spectroscopic study and dynamical analysis of ~2600 M7 dwarfs. We confirm our previous finding that the fraction of magnetically active stars decreases with vertical distance from the Galactic plane. We also show that the mean luminosity of the H-alpha emission has a small but statistically significant decrease with distance. Using space motions for ~1300 stars and a simple one-dimensional dynamical simulation, we demonstrate that the drop in the activity fraction of M7 dwarfs can be explained by thin disk dynamical heating and a rapid decrease of magnetic activity at a mean stellar age of ~6-7 Gyr.
  • We report the identification of LP 400-22 (WD 2234+222) as a very low-mass and high-velocity white dwarf. The ultraviolet GALEX and optical photometric colors and a spectral line analysis of LP 400-22 show this star to have an effective temperature of 11080+/-140 K and a surface gravity of log g = 6.32+/-0.08. Therefore, this is a helium core white dwarf with a mass of 0.17 M_solar. The tangential velocity of this white dwarf is 414+/-43 km/s, making it one of the fastest moving white dwarfs known. We discuss probable evolutionary scenarios for this remarkable object.
  • We report follow-up XMM-Newton and ground-based optical observations of the unusual X-ray binary SDSS J102347.67+003841.2 (=FIRST J102347.6+003841), and a new candidate intermediate polar found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J093249.57+472523.0. SDSS J1023 was observed in its low-state, with similar magnitude/color (V=17.4 and B=17.9), and smooth orbital modulation as seen in most previous observations. We further refine the ephemeris (for photometric minimum) to: HJD(TT)_min= 2453081.8546(3) + E* 0.198094(1) d. It is easily detected in X-rays at an unabsorbed flux (0.01-10.0 keV) of 5x10e-13 erg/cm^2/s. Fitting a variety of models we find that: (i) either a hot (kT>~15 keV) optically thin plasma emission model (bremsstrahlung or MEKAL) or a simple power law can provide adequate fits to the data; (ii) these models prefer a low column density ~10e19 cm^-2; (iii) a neutron star atmosphere plus power law model (as found for quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries) can also produce a good fit (for plausible distances), though only for a much higher column of about 4x10e20 cm^-2 and a very cool atmosphere kT<~50eV. These results support the case that SDSS J1023 is a transient LMXB, and indeed places it in the subclass of such systems whose quiescent X-ray emission is dominated by a hard power law component. Our optical photometry of SDSS J0932 reveals that it is an high inclination eclipsing system. Combined with its optical characteristics -- high excitation emission lines, and brightness, yielding a large F_X/F_opt ratio -- its highly absorbed X-ray spectrum argues that SDSS J0932 is a strong IP candidate. However, only more extensive optical photometry and a detection of its spin or spin-orbit beat frequency can confirm this classification. (abridged)
  • Fifty-two magnetic white dwarfs have been identified in spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) obtained between mid-2002 and the end of 2004, including Data Releases 2 and 3. Though not as numerous nor as diverse as the discoveries from the first Data Release, the collection exhibits polar field strengths ranging from 1.5MG to ~1000MG, and includes two new unusual atomic DQA examples, a molecular DQ, and five stars that show hydrogen in fields above 500MG. The highest-field example, SDSSJ2346+3853, may be the most strongly magnetic white dwarf yet discovered. Analysis of the photometric data indicates that the magnetic sample spans the same temperature range as for nonmagnetic white dwarfs from the SDSS, and support is found for previous claims that magnetic white dwarfs tend to have larger masses than their nonmagnetic counterparts. A glaring exception to this trend is the apparently low-gravity object SDSSJ0933+1022, which may have a history involving a close binary companion.
  • We investigate the relationship between age and chromospheric activity for 139 M dwarf stars in wide binary systems with white dwarf companions. The age of each system is determined from the cooling age of its white dwarf component. The current limit for activity-age relations found for M dwarfs in open clusters is 4 Gyr. Our unique approach to finding ages for M stars allows for the exploration of this relationship at ages older than 4 Gyr. The general trend of stars remaining active for a longer time at later spectral type is confirmed. However, our larger sample and greater age range reveals additional complexity in assigning age based on activity alone. We find that M dwarfs in wide binaries older than 4 Gyr depart from the log-linear relation for clusters and are found to have activity at magnitudes, colors and masses which are brighter, bluer and more massive than predicted by the cluster relation. In addition to our activity-age results, we present the measured radial velocities and complete space motions for 161 white dwarf stars in wide binaries.
  • We report follow-up observations of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Cataclysmic Variable SDSS J210014.12+004446.0 (hereafter SDSS J2100). We obtained photometry and spectroscopy in both outburst and quiescent states, providing the first quiescent spectrum of this source. In both states, non-sinusoidal photometric modulations are apparent, suggestive of superhumps, placing SDSS J2100 in the SU UMa subclass of dwarf novae. However, the periods during outburst and quiescence differ significantly, being 2.099 plus or minus 0.002 hr and 1.96 plus or minus 0.02 hr respectively. Our phase-resolved spectroscopy during outburst yielded an estimate of about 2 hr for the orbital period, consistent with the photometry. The presence of the shorter period modulation at quiescence is unusual, but not unique. Another atypical feature is the relative weakness of the Balmer emission lines in quiescence. Overall, we find a close similarity between SDSS J2100 and the well-studied superhump cataclysmic Variable V503 Cygni. By analogy, we suggest that the quiescent modulation is due to a tilted accretion disk -- producing negative superhumps -- and the modulation in outburst is due to positive superhumps from the precession of an elliptical disk.
  • We report follow-up XMM-Newton and optical observations of three new polars found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Simple modeling of the X-ray spectra, and consideration of the details of the X-ray and optical lightcurves corroborate the polar nature of these three systems and provide further insights into their accretion characteristics. During the XMM-Newton observation of SDSS J072910.68+365838.3, X-rays are undetected apart from a probable flare event, during which we find both the typical hard X-ray bremsstrahlung component and a very strong line O VII (E=0.57 keV), but no evidence of a soft blackbody contribution. In SDSS J075240.45+362823.2 we identify an X-ray eclipse at the beginning of the observation, roughly in phase with the primary minimum of the optical broad band curve. The X-ray spectra require the presence of both hard and soft X-ray components, with their luminosity ratio consistent with that found in other recent XMM-Newton results on polars. Lastly, SDSS J170053.30+400357.6 appears optically as a very typical polar, however its large amplitude optical modulation is 180 degrees out of phase with the variation in our short X-ray lightcurve.
  • We present a spectroscopic analysis of nearly 8000 late-type dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using the Halpha emission line as an activity indicator, we investigate the fraction of active stars as a function of spectral type and find a peak near type M8, confirming previous results. In contrast to past findings, we find that not all M7-M8 stars are active. We show that this may be a selection effect of the distance distributions of previous samples, as the active stars appear to be concentrated near the Galactic Plane. We also examine the activity strength (ratio of the luminosity emitted in Halpha to the bolometric luminosity) for each star, and find that the mean activity strength is constant over the range M0-M5 and declines at later types. The decline begins at a slightly earlier spectral type than previously found. We explore the effect that activity has on the broadband photometric colors and find no significant differences between active and inactive stars. We also carry out a search for subdwarfs using spectroscopic metallicity indicators, and find 60 subdwarf candidates. Several of these candidates are near the extreme subdwarf boundary. The spectroscopic subdwarf candidates are redder by \~0.2 magnitudes in g-r compared to disk dwarfs at the same r-i color.
  • We present the full spectroscopic white dwarf and hot subdwarf sample from the SDSS first data release, DR1. We find 2551 white dwarf stars of various types, 240 hot subdwarf stars, and an additional 144 objects we have identified as uncertain white dwarf stars. Of the white dwarf stars, 1888 are non-magnetic DA types and 171, non-magnetic DBs. The remaining (492) objects consist of all different types of white dwarf stars: DO, DQ, DC, DH, DZ, hybrid stars like DAB, etc., and those with non-degenerate companions. We fit the DA and DB spectra with a grid of models to determine the Teff and log(g) for each object. For all objects, we provide coordinates, proper motions, SDSS photometric magnitudes, and enough information to retrieve the spectrum/image from the SDSS public database. This catalog nearly doubles the known sample of spectroscopically-identified white dwarf stars. In the DR1 imaged area of the sky, we increase the known sample of white dwarf stars by a factor of 8.5. We also comment on several particularly interesting objects in this sample.
  • Photometric and spectroscopic observations reveal the Sloan Digital Sky Survey cataclysmic variable SDSS J132723.39+652854.2 to be a likely SW Sex star with an orbital period of P = 3.28 hours. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum shows strong HeI, HeII and Balmer emission lines. Time resolved spectra acquired at Apache Point Observatory reveal absorption-line structure within the emission lines near phase 0.5. Photometric data obtained at Manastash Ridge Observatory using Harris V and B filters reveal a high inclination system (i = 80 degrees) with deep (~ 2 mag.) eclipses. The orbital period and the spectral variations favor an SW Sex interpretation.