• A moderately intense $450$ fs laser pulse is used to create rotational wave packets in gas phase $\rm{I_2}$ molecules. The ensuing time-dependent alignment, measured by Coulomb explosion imaging with a delayed probe pulse, exhibits the characteristic revival structures expected for rotational wave packets but also a complex non-periodic substructure and decreasing mean alignment not observed before. A quantum mechanical model attributes the phenomena to coupling between the rotational angular momenta and the nuclear spins through the electric quadrupole interaction. The calculated alignment trace agrees very well with the experimental results.
  • Time-resolved X-ray scattering patterns from photoexcited molecules in solution are in many cases anisotropic at the ultrafast time scales accessible at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs). This anisotropy arises from the interaction of a linearly polarized UV-vis pump laser pulse with the sample, which induces anisotropic structural changes that can be captured by femtosecond X-ray pulses. In this work we describe a method for quantitative analysis of the anisotropic scattering signal arising from an ensemble of molecules and we demonstrate how its use can enhance the structural sensitivity of the time-resolved X-ray scattering experiment. We apply this method on time-resolved X-ray scattering patterns measured upon photoexcitation of a solvated di-platinum complex at an XFEL and explore the key parameters involved. We show that a combined analysis of the anisotropic and isotropic difference scattering signals in this experiment allows a more precise determination of the main photoinduced structural change in the solute, i.e. the change in Pt-Pt bond length, and yields more information on the excitation channels than the analysis of the isotropic scattering only. Finally, we discuss how the anisotropic transient response of the solvent can enable the determination of key experimental parameters such as the Instrument Response Function.
  • The absorption of a single photon that excites a quantum system from a low to a high energy level is an elementary process of light-matter interaction, and a route towards realizing pure single-photon absorption has both fundamental and practical implications in quantum technology. Due to nonlinear optical effects, however, the probability of pure single-photon absorption is usually very low, which is particularly pertinent in the case of strong ultrafast laser pulses with broad bandwidth. Here we demonstrate theoretically a counterintuitive coherent single-photon absorption scheme by eliminating nonlinear interactions of ultrafast laser pulses with quantum systems. That is, a completely linear response of the system with respect to the spectral energy density of the incident light at the transition frequency can be obtained for all transition probabilities between 0 and 100% in a multi-level quantum systems. To that end, a new multi-objective optimization algorithm is developed to find an optimal spectral phase of an ultrafast laser pulse, which is capable of eliminating all possible nonlinear optical responses while maximizing the probability of single-photon absorption between quantum states. This work not only deepens our understanding of light-matter interactions, but also offers a new way to study photophysical and photochemical processes in the "absence" of nonlinear optical effects.