• A new generation of wide-field radio interferometers designed for 21-cm surveys is being built as drift scan instruments allowing them to observe large fractions of the sky. With large numbers of antennas and frequency channels the enormous instantaneous data rates of these telescopes require novel, efficient, data management and analysis techniques. The $m$-mode formalism exploits the periodicity of such data with the sidereal day, combined with the assumption of statistical isotropy of the sky, to achieve large computational savings and render optimal analysis methods computationally tractable. We present an extension to that work that allows us to adopt a more realistic sky model and treat objects such as bright point sources. We develop a linear procedure for deconvolving maps, using a Wiener filter reconstruction technique, which simultaneously allows filtering of these unwanted components. We construct an algorithm, based on the Sherman-Morrison-Woodbury formula, to efficiently invert the data covariance matrix, as required for any optimal signal-to-noise weighting. The performance of our algorithm is demonstrated using simulations of a cylindrical transit telescope.
  • The diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission should exhibit a low level of diffuse circular polarization (CP) due to the circular motions of the emitting relativistic electrons. This probes the Galactic magnetic field in a similar way as the product of total Galactic synchrotron intensity times Faraday depth. We use this to construct an all sky prediction of the so far unexplored Galactic CP from existing measurements. This map can be used to search for this CP signal in low frequency radio data even prior to imaging. If detected as predicted, it would confirm the expectation that relativistic electrons, and not positrons, are responsible for the Galactic radio emission. Furthermore, the strength of real to predicted circular polarization would provide statistical information on magnetic structures along the line-of-sights.
  • We present results from a new incoherent-beam Fast Radio Burst (FRB) search on the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder. Its large instantaneous field of view (FoV) and relative thermal insensitivity allow us to probe the ultra-bright tail of the FRB distribution, and to test a recent claim that this distribution's slope, $\alpha\equiv-\frac{\partial \log N}{\partial \log S}$, is quite small. A 256-input incoherent beamformer was deployed on the CHIME Pathfinder for this purpose. If the FRB distribution were described by a single power-law with $\alpha=0.7$, we would expect an FRB detection every few days, making this the fastest survey on sky at present. We collected 1268 hours of data, amounting to one of the largest exposures of any FRB survey, with over 2.4\,$\times$\,10$^5$\,deg$^2$\,hrs. Having seen no bursts, we have constrained the rate of extremely bright events to $<\!13$\,sky$^{-1}$\,day$^{-1}$ above $\sim$\,220$\sqrt{(\tau/\rm ms)}$ Jy\,ms for $\tau$ between 1.3 and 100\,ms, at 400--800\,MHz. The non-detection also allows us to rule out $\alpha\lesssim0.9$ with 95$\%$ confidence, after marginalizing over uncertainties in the GBT rate at 700--900\,MHz, though we show that for a cosmological population and a large dynamic range in flux density, $\alpha$ is brightness-dependent. Since FRBs now extend to large enough distances that non-Euclidean effects are significant, there is still expected to be a dearth of faint events and relative excess of bright events. Nevertheless we have constrained the allowed number of ultra-intense FRBs. While this does not have significant implications for deeper, large-FoV surveys like full CHIME and APERTIF, it does have important consequences for other wide-field, small dish experiments.
  • Polarization leakage of foreground synchrotron emission is a critical issue in HI intensity mapping experiments. While the sought-after HI emission is unpolarized, polarized foregrounds such as Galactic and extragalactic synchrotron radiation, if coupled with instrumental impurity, can mimic or overwhelm the HI signals. In this paper we present the methodology for polarization calibration at 700-900 MHz, applied on data obtained from the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). We use astrophysical sources, both polarized and unpolarized sources including quasars and pulsars, as calibrators to characterize the polarization leakage and control systematic effects in our GBT HI intensity mapping project. The resulting fractional errors on polarization measurements on boresight are well controlled to within 0.6%-0.8% of their total intensity. The polarized beam patterns are measured by performing spider scans across both polarized quasars and pulsars. A dominant Stokes I to V leakage feature and secondary features of Stokes I to Q and I to U leakages in the 700-900 MHz frequency range are identified. These characterizations are important for separating foreground polarization leakage from the HI 21 cm signal.
  • The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder radio telescope is currently surveying the northern hemisphere between 400 and 800 MHz. By mapping the large scale structure of neutral hydrogen through its redshifted 21 cm line emission between $z \sim 0.8-2.5$ CHIME will contribute to our understanding of Dark Energy. Bright astrophysical foregrounds must be separated from the neutral hydrogen signal, a task which requires precise characterization of the polarized telescope beams. Using the DRAO John A. Galt 26 m telescope, we have developed a holography instrument and technique for mapping the CHIME Pathfinder beams. We report the status of the instrument and initial results of this effort.
  • We investigate whether current data on the distribution of observed flux densities of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are consistent with a constant source density in Euclidean space. We use the number of FRBs detected in two surveys with different characteristics along with the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the detected FRBs in a formalism similar to a V/V_max-test to constrain the distribution of flux densities. We find consistency between the data and a Euclidean distribution. Any extension of this model is therefore not data-driven and needs to be motivated separately. As a byproduct we also obtain new improved limits for the FRB rate at 1.4 GHz, which had not been constrained in this way before.
  • Estimating the all-sky rate of fast radio bursts (FRBs) has been difficult due to small-number statistics and the fact that they are seen by disparate surveys in different regions of the sky. In this paper we provide limits for the FRB rate at 800 MHz based on the only burst detected at frequencies below 1.4 GHz, FRB 110523. We discuss the difficulties in rate estimation, particularly in providing an all-sky rate above a single fluence threshold. We find an implied rate between 700-900 MHz that is consistent with the rate at 1.4 GHz, scaling to $6.4^{+29.5}_{-5.0} \times 10^3$\,sky$^{-1}$\,day$^{-1}$ for an HTRU-like survey. This is promising for upcoming experiments below a GHz like CHIME and UTMOST, for which we forecast detection rates. Given 110523's discovery at 32$\sigma$ with nothing weaker detected, down to the threshold of 8$\sigma$, we find consistency with a Euclidean flux distribution but disfavour steep distributions, ruling out $\gamma > 2.2$.
  • We discuss some of the claims that have been made regarding the statistics of fast radio bursts (FRBs). In an earlier paper \citep{2015arXiv150505535C} we conjectured that flicker noise associated with FRB repetition could show up in non-cataclysmic neutron star emission models, like supergiant pulses. We show how the current limits of repetition would be significantly weakened if their repeat rate really were non-Poissonian and had a pink or red spectrum. Repetition and its statistics have implications for observing strategy, generally favouring shallow wide-field surveys, since in the non-repeating scenario survey depth is unimportant. We also discuss the statistics of the apparent latitudinal dependence of FRBs, and offer a simple method for calculating the significance of this effect. We provide a generalized Bayesian framework for addressing this problem, which allows for direct model comparison. It is shown how the evidence for a steep latitudinal gradient of the FRB rate is less strong than initially suggested and simple explanations like increased scattering and sky temperature in the plane are sufficient to decrease the low-latitude burst rate, given current data. The reported dearth of bursts near the plane is further complicated if FRBs have non-Poissonian repetition, since in that case the event rate inferred from observation depends on observing strategy.
  • We know that magnetic fields are pervasive across all scales in the Universe and over all of cosmic time and yet our understanding of many of the properties of magnetic fields is still limited. We do not yet know when, where or how the first magnetic fields in the Universe were formed, nor do we fully understand their role in fundamental processes such as galaxy formation or cosmic ray acceleration or how they influence the evolution of astrophysical objects. The greatest challenge to addressing these issues has been a lack of deep, broad bandwidth polarimetric data over large areas of the sky. The Square Kilometre Array will radically improve this situation via an all-sky polarisation survey that delivers both high quality polarisation imaging in combination with observations of 7-14 million extragalactic rotation measures. Here we summarise how this survey will improve our understanding of a range of astrophysical phenomena on scales from individual Galactic objects to the cosmic web.
  • We analyze the 6.5yr all-sky data from the Fermi LAT restricted to gamma-ray photons with energies between 0.6-307.2GeV. Raw count maps show a superposition of diffuse and point-like emission structures and are subject to shot noise and instrumental artifacts. Using the D3PO inference algorithm, we model the observed photon counts as the sum of a diffuse and a point-like photon flux, convolved with the instrumental beam and subject to Poissonian shot noise. D3PO performs a Bayesian inference in this setting without the use of spatial or spectral templates;i.e., it removes the shot noise, deconvolves the instrumental response, and yields estimates for the two flux components separately. The non-parametric reconstruction uncovers the morphology of the diffuse photon flux up to several hundred GeV. We present an all-sky spectral index map for the diffuse component. We show that the diffuse gamma-ray flux can be described phenomenologically by only two distinct components: a soft component, presumably dominated by hadronic processes, tracing the dense, cold interstellar medium and a hard component, presumably dominated by leptonic interactions, following the hot and dilute medium and outflows such as the Fermi bubbles. A comparison of the soft component with the Galactic dust emission indicates that the dust-to-soft-gamma ratio in the interstellar medium decreases with latitude. The spectrally hard component exists in a thick Galactic disk and tends to flow out of the Galaxy at some locations. Furthermore, we find the angular power spectrum of the diffuse flux to roughly follow a power law with an index of 2.47 on large scales, independent of energy. Our first catalog of source candidates includes 3106 candidates of which we associate 1381(1897) with known sources from the 2nd(3rd) Fermi catalog. We observe gamma-ray emission in the direction of a few galaxy clusters hosting radio halos.
  • (abridged) Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations. We vary our assumptions about the data, showing that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m^2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly constrained by the data in most cases.
  • Magnetic fields play an important role in shaping the structure and evolution of the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies, but the details of this relationship remain unclear. With SKA1, the 3D structure of galactic magnetic fields and its connection to star formation will be revealed. A highly sensitive probe of the internal structure of the magnetoionized ISM is the partial depolarization of synchrotron radiation from inside the volume. Different configurations of magnetic field and ionized gas within the resolution element of the telescope lead to frequency-dependent changes in the observed degree of polarization. The results of spectro-polarimetric observations are tied to physical structure in the ISM through comparison with detailed modeling, supplemented with the use of new analysis techniques that are being actively developed and studied within the community such as Rotation Measure Synthesis. The SKA will enable this field to come into its own and begin the study of the detailed structure of the magnetized ISM in a sample of nearby galaxies, thanks to its extraordinary wideband capabilities coupled with the combination of excellent surface brightness sensitivity and angular resolution.
  • To better understand the origin and properties of cosmological magnetic fields, a detailed knowledge of magnetic fields in the large-scale structure of the Universe (galaxy clusters, filaments) is crucial. We propose a new statistical approach to study magnetic fields on large scales with the rotation measure grid data that will be obtained with the new generation of radio interferometers.
  • Magnetic fields in the Milky Way are present on a wide variety of sizes and strengths, influencing many processes in the Galactic ecosystem such as star formation, gas dynamics, jets, and evolution of supernova remnants or pulsar wind nebulae. Observation methods are complex and indirect; the most used of these are a grid of rotation measures of unresolved polarized extragalactic sources, and broadband polarimetry of diffuse emission. Current studies of magnetic fields in the Milky Way reveal a global spiral magnetic field with a significant turbulent component; the limited sample of magnetic field measurements in discrete objects such as supernova remnants and HII regions shows a wide variety in field configurations; a few detections of magnetic fields in Young Stellar Object jets have been published; and the magnetic field structure in the Galactic Center is still under debate. The SKA will unravel the 3D structure and configurations of magnetic fields in the Milky Way on sub-parsec to galaxy scales, including field structure in the Galactic Center. The global configuration of the Milky Way disk magnetic field, probed through pulsar RMs, will resolve controversy about reversals in the Galactic plane. Characteristics of interstellar turbulence can be determined from the grid of background RMs. We expect to learn to understand magnetic field structures in protostellar jets, supernova remnants, and other discrete sources, due to the vast increase in sample sizes possible with the SKA. This knowledge of magnetic fields in the Milky Way will not only be crucial in understanding of the evolution and interaction of Galactic structures, but will also help to define and remove Galactic foregrounds for a multitude of extragalactic and cosmological studies.
  • The extraction of foreground and CMB maps from multi-frequency observations relies mostly on the different frequency behavior of the different components. Existing Bayesian methods additionally make use of a Gaussian prior for the CMB whose correlation structure is described by an unknown angular power spectrum. We argue for the natural extension of this by using non-trivial priors also for the foreground components. Focusing on diffuse Galactic foregrounds, we propose a log-normal model including unknown spatial correlations within each component and cross-correlations between the different foreground components. We present case studies at low resolution that demonstrate the superior performance of this model when compared to an analysis with flat priors for all components.
  • A VLA Sky Survey of the extragalactic sky at S band (2-4 GHz) with polarization information can uniquely probe the magneto-ionic medium in a wide range of astrophysical environments over cosmic time. For a shallow all-sky survey, we expect to detect over 4 million sources in total intensity $>$ 0.45 mJy beam$^{-1}$ and over 2.2$\times$10$^5$ sources in polarized intensity. With these new observations, we expect to discover new classes of polarized radio sources in very turbulent astrophysical environments and those with extreme values of Faraday depth. Moreover, by determining reliable Faraday depths and by modeling depolarization effects, we can derive properties of the magneto-ionic medium associated with AGNs, absorption line systems and galaxies, addressing the following unresolved questions: (1) What is the covering fraction, the degree of turbulence and the origin of absorption line systems? (2) What is the thermal content in AGNs and radio galaxies? (3) How do AGNs and galaxies evolve over cosmic time? (4) What causes the increase in percentage polarization with decreasing flux densities at the low flux density end of the polarized source count? (5) What is the growth rate of large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies?
  • We present an approximate calculation of the full Bayesian posterior probability distribution for the local non-Gaussianity parameter $f_{\text{nl}}$ from observations of cosmic microwave background anisotropies within the framework of information field theory. The approximation that we introduce allows us to dispense with numerically expensive sampling techniques. We use a novel posterior validation method (DIP test) in cosmology to test the precision of our method. It transfers inaccuracies of the calculated posterior into deviations from a uniform distribution for a specially constructed test quantity. For this procedure we study toy cases that use one- and two-dimensional flat skies, as well as the full spherical sky. We find that we are able to calculate the posterior precisely under a flat-sky approximation, albeit not in the spherical case. We argue that this is most likely due to an insufficient precision of the used numerical implementation of the spherical harmonic transform, which might affect other non-Gaussianity estimators as well. Furthermore, we present how a nonlinear reconstruction of the primordial gravitational potential on the full spherical sky can be obtained in principle. Using the flat-sky approximation, we find deviations for the posterior of $f_{\text{nl}}$ from a Gaussian shape that become more significant for larger values of the underlying true $f_{\text{nl}}$. We also perform a comparison to the well-known estimator of Komatsu et al. [Astrophys. J. 634, 14 (2005)] and finally derive the posterior for the local non-Gaussianity parameter $g_{\text{nl}}$ as an example of how to extend the introduced formalism to higher orders of non-Gaussianity.
  • We present an error-diagnostic validation method for posterior distributions in Bayesian signal inference, an advancement of a previous work. It transfers deviations from the correct posterior into characteristic deviations from a uniform distribution of a quantity constructed for this purpose. We show that this method is able to reveal and discriminate several kinds of numerical and approximation errors, as well as their impact on the posterior distribution. For this we present four typical analytical examples of posteriors with incorrect variance, skewness, position of the maximum, or normalization. We show further how this test can be applied to multidimensional signals.
  • NIFTY, "Numerical Information Field Theory", is a software package designed to enable the development of signal inference algorithms that operate regardless of the underlying spatial grid and its resolution. Its object-oriented framework is written in Python, although it accesses libraries written in Cython, C++, and C for efficiency. NIFTY offers a toolkit that abstracts discretized representations of continuous spaces, fields in these spaces, and operators acting on fields into classes. Thereby, the correct normalization of operations on fields is taken care of automatically without concerning the user. This allows for an abstract formulation and programming of inference algorithms, including those derived within information field theory. Thus, NIFTY permits its user to rapidly prototype algorithms in 1D, and then apply the developed code in higher-dimensional settings of real world problems. The set of spaces on which NIFTY operates comprises point sets, n-dimensional regular grids, spherical spaces, their harmonic counterparts, and product spaces constructed as combinations of those. The functionality and diversity of the package is demonstrated by a Wiener filter code example that successfully runs without modification regardless of the space on which the inference problem is defined.
  • We develop a method to infer log-normal random fields from measurement data affected by Gaussian noise. The log-normal model is well suited to describe strictly positive signals with fluctuations whose amplitude varies over several orders of magnitude. We use the formalism of minimum Gibbs free energy to derive an algorithm that uses the signal's correlation structure to regularize the reconstruction. The correlation structure, described by the signal's power spectrum, is thereby reconstructed from the same data set. We show that the minimization of the Gibbs free energy, corresponding to a Gaussian approximation to the posterior marginalized over the power spectrum, is equivalent to the empirical Bayes ansatz, in which the power spectrum is fixed to its maximum a posteriori value. We further introduce a prior for the power spectrum that enforces spectral smoothness. The appropriateness of this prior in different scenarios is discussed and its effects on the reconstruction's results are demonstrated. We validate the performance of our reconstruction algorithm in a series of one- and two-dimensional test cases with varying degrees of non-linearity and different noise levels.
  • In 2011, the XENON100 experiment has set unprecedented constraints on dark matter-nucleon interactions, excluding dark matter candidates with masses down to 6 GeV if the corresponding cross section is larger than 10^{-39} cm^2. The dependence of the exclusion limit in terms of the scintillation efficiency (Leff) has been debated at length. To overcome possible criticisms XENON100 performed an analysis in which Leff was considered as a nuisance parameter and its uncertainties were profiled out by using a Gaussian likelihood in which the mean value corresponds to the best fit Leff value smoothly extrapolated to zero below 3 keVnr. Although such a method seems fairly robust, it does not account for more extreme types of extrapolation nor does it enable to anticipate on how much the exclusion limit would vary if new data were to support a flat behaviour for Leff below 3 keVnr, for example. Yet, such a question is crucial for light dark matter models which are close to the published XENON100 limit. To answer this issue, we use a maximum Likelihood ratio analysis, as done by the XENON100 collaboration, but do not consider Leff as a nuisance parameter. Instead, Leff is obtained directly from the fits to the data. This enables us to define frequentist confidence intervals by marginalising over Leff.
  • Estimating the diagonal entries of a matrix, that is not directly accessible but only available as a linear operator in the form of a computer routine, is a common necessity in many computational applications, especially in image reconstruction and statistical inference. Here, methods of statistical inference are used to improve the accuracy or the computational costs of matrix probing methods to estimate matrix diagonals. In particular, the generalized Wiener filter methodology, as developed within information field theory, is shown to significantly improve estimates based on only a few sampling probes, in cases in which some form of continuity of the solution can be assumed. The strength, length scale, and precise functional form of the exploited autocorrelation function of the matrix diagonal is determined from the probes themselves. The developed algorithm is successfully applied to mock and real world problems. These performance tests show that, in situations where a matrix diagonal has to be calculated from only a small number of computationally expensive probes, a speedup by a factor of 2 to 10 is possible with the proposed method.
  • We derive a method to reconstruct Gaussian signals from linear measurements with Gaussian noise. This new algorithm is intended for applications in astrophysics and other sciences. The starting point of our considerations is the principle of minimum Gibbs free energy which was previously used to derive a signal reconstruction algorithm handling uncertainties in the signal covariance. We extend this algorithm to simultaneously uncertain noise and signal covariances using the same principles in the derivation. The resulting equations are general enough to be applied in many different contexts. We demonstrate the performance of the algorithm by applying it to specific example situations and compare it to algorithms not allowing for uncertainties in the noise covariance. The results show that the method we suggest performs very well under a variety of circumstances and is indeed qualitatively superior to the other methods in cases where uncertainty in the noise covariance is present.