• Hybrid silicon nanowires with an integrated light-emitting segment can significantly advance nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. They would combine transport and optical characteristics in a nanoscale device, which can operate in the fundamental single-electron and single-photon regime. III-V materials, such as direct bandgap gallium-arsenide, are excellent candidates for such optical segments. However, interfacing them with silicon during crystal growth is a major challenge, because of the lattice mismatch, different expansion coefficients and the formation of anti-phase boundaries. Here, we demonstrate a silicon nanowire with an integrated gallium-arsenide segment. We precisely control the catalyst composition and surface chemistry to obtain dislocation-free interfaces. The integration of gallium-arsenide of high optical quality with silicon is enabled by short gallium phosphide buffers. We anticipate that such hybrid silicon/III-V nanowires open practical routes for quantum information devices, where for instance electronic and photonic quantum bits are manipulated in a III-V segment and stored in a silicon section.
  • The ability to achieve near-unity light extraction efficiency is necessary for a truly deterministic single photon source. The most promising method to reach such high efficiencies is based on embedding single photon emitters in tapered photonic waveguides defined by top-down etching techniques. However, light extraction efficiencies in current top-down approaches are limited by fabrication imperfections and etching induced defects. The efficiency is further tempered by randomly positioned off-axis quantum emitters. Here, we present perfectly positioned single quantum dots on the axis of a tailored nanowire waveguide using bottom-up growth. In comparison to quantum dots in nanowires without waveguide, we demonstrate a 24-fold enhancement in the single photon flux, corresponding to a light extraction efficiency of 42 %. Such high efficiencies in one-dimensional nanowires are promising to transfer quantum information over large distances between remote stationary qubits using flying qubits within the same nanowire p-n junction.