• Many societal decision problems lie in high-dimensional continuous spaces not amenable to the voting techniques common for their discrete or single-dimensional counterparts. These problems are typically discretized before running an election or decided upon through negotiation by representatives. We propose a algorithm called {\sc Iterative Local Voting} for collective decision-making in this setting. In this algorithm, voters are sequentially sampled and asked to modify a candidate solution within some local neighborhood of its current value, as defined by a ball in some chosen norm, with the size of the ball shrinking at a specified rate. We first prove the convergence of this algorithm under appropriate choices of neighborhoods to Pareto optimal solutions with desirable fairness properties in certain natural settings: when the voters' utilities can be expressed in terms of some form of distance from their ideal solution, and when these utilities are additively decomposable across dimensions. In many of these cases, we obtain convergence to the societal welfare maximizing solution. We then describe an experiment in which we test our algorithm for the decision of the U.S. Federal Budget on Mechanical Turk with over 2,000 workers, employing neighborhoods defined by $\mathcal{L}^1, \mathcal{L}^2$ and $\mathcal{L}^\infty$ balls. We make several observations that inform future implementations of such a procedure.
  • We propose a Bayesian model of unsupervised semantic role induction in multiple languages, and use it to explore the usefulness of parallel corpora for this task. Our joint Bayesian model consists of individual models for each language plus additional latent variables that capture alignments between roles across languages. Because it is a generative Bayesian model, we can do evaluations in a variety of scenarios just by varying the inference procedure, without changing the model, thereby comparing the scenarios directly. We compare using only monolingual data, using a parallel corpus, using a parallel corpus with annotations in the other language, and using small amounts of annotation in the target language. We find that the biggest impact of adding a parallel corpus to training is actually the increase in mono-lingual data, with the alignments to another language resulting in small improvements, even with labeled data for the other language.
  • Intelligent load balancing is essential to fully realize the benefits of dense heterogeneous networks. Current techniques have largely been studied with single slope path loss models, though multi-slope models are known to more closely match real deployments. This paper develops insight into the performance of biasing and uplink/downlink decoupling for user association in HetNets with dual slope path loss models. It is shown that dual slope path loss models change the tradeoffs inherent in biasing and reduce gains from both biasing and uplink/downlink decoupling. The results show that with the dual slope path loss models, the bias maximizing the median rate is not optimal for other users, e.g., edge users. Furthermore, optimal downlink biasing is shown to realize most of the gains from downlink-uplink decoupling. Moreover, the user association gains in dense networks are observed to be quite sensitive to the path loss exponent beyond the critical distance in a dual slope model.