• In this paper we report a clustering analysis of upper main-sequence stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using data from the VMC survey (the VISTA near-infrared YJKs survey of the Magellanic system). Young stellar structures are identified as surface overdensities on a range of significance levels. They are found to be organized in a hierarchical pattern, such that larger structures at lower significance levels contain smaller ones at higher significance levels. They have very irregular morphologies, with a perimeter-area dimension of 1.44 +/- 0.02 for their projected boundaries. They have a power-law mass-size relation, power-law size/mass distributions, and a lognormal surface density distribution. We derive a projected fractal dimension of 1.48 +/- 0.03 from the mass-size relation, or of 1.4 +/- 0.1 from the size distribution, reflecting significant lumpiness of the young stellar structures. These properties are remarkably similar to those of a turbulent interstellar medium (ISM), supporting a scenario of hierarchical star formation regulated by supersonic turbulence.
  • Star formation is a hierarchical process, forming young stellar structures of star clusters, associations, and complexes over a wide scale range. The star-forming complex in the bar region of the Large Magellanic Cloud is investigated with upper main-sequence stars observed by the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds. The upper main-sequence stars exhibit highly non-uniform distributions. Young stellar structures inside the complex are identified from the stellar density map as density enhancements of different significance levels. We find that these structures are hierarchically organized such that larger, lower-density structures contain one or several smaller, higher-density ones. They follow power-law size and mass distributions as well as a lognormal surface density distribution. All these results support a scenario of hierarchical star formation regulated by turbulence. The temporal evolution of young stellar structures is explored by using subsamples of upper main-sequence stars with different magnitude and age ranges. While the youngest subsample, with a median age of log($\tau$/yr)~=~7.2, contains most substructure, progressively older ones are less and less substructured. The oldest subsample, with a median age of log($\tau$/yr)~=~8.0, is almost indistinguishable from a uniform distribution on spatial scales of 30--300~pc, suggesting that the young stellar structures are completely dispersed on a timescale of $\sim$100~Myr. These results are consistent with the characteristics of the 30~Doradus complex and the entire Large Magellanic Cloud, suggesting no significant environmental effects. We further point out that the fractal dimension may be method-dependent for stellar samples with significant age spreads.
  • We study the luminosity function of intermediate-age red-clump stars using deep, near-infrared photometric data covering $\sim$ 20 deg$^2$ located throughout the central part of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), comprising the main body and the galaxy's eastern wing, based on observations obtained with the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds (VMC). We identified regions which show a foreground population ($\sim$11.8 $\pm$ 2.0 kpc in front of the main body) in the form of a distance bimodality in the red-clump distribution. The most likely explanation for the origin of this feature is tidal stripping from the SMC rather than the extended stellar haloes of the Magellanic Clouds and/or tidally stripped stars from the Large Magellanic Cloud. The homogeneous and continuous VMC data trace this feature in the direction of the Magellanic Bridge and, particularly, identify (for the first time) the inner region ($\sim$ 2 -- 2.5 kpc from the centre) from where the signatures of interactions start becoming evident. This result provides observational evidence of the formation of the Magellanic Bridge from tidally stripped material from the SMC.
  • We study the hierarchical stellar structures in a $\sim$1.5 deg$^2$ area covering the 30 Doradus-N158-N159-N160 star-forming complex with the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds. Based on the young upper main-sequence stars, we find that the surface densities cover a wide range of values, from log($\Sigma\cdot$pc$^2$) $\lesssim$ $-$2.0 to log($\Sigma\cdot$pc$^2$) $\gtrsim$ 0.0. Their distributions are highly non-uniform, showing groups that frequently have sub-groups inside. The sizes of the stellar groups do not exhibit characteristic values, and range continuously from several parsecs to more than 100 pc; the cumulative size distribution can be well described by a single power law, with the power-law index indicating a projected fractal dimension $D_2$ = 1.6 $\pm$ 0.3. We suggest that the phenomena revealed here support a scenario of hierarchical star formation. Comparisons with other star-forming regions and galaxies are also discussed.
  • Asteroseismology allows for deriving precise values of surface gravity of stars. The accurate asteroseismic determinations now available for large number of stars in the Kepler fields can be used to check and calibrate surface gravities that are currently being obtained spectroscopically for a huge numbers of stars targeted by large-scale spectroscopic surveys, such as the on-going Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) Galactic survey. The LAMOST spectral surveys have obtained a large number of stellar spectra in the Kepler fields. Stellar atmospheric parameters of those stars have been determined with the LAMOST Stellar Parameter Pipeline at Peking University (LSP3), by template matching with the MILES empirical spectral library. In the current work, we compare surface gravities yielded by LSP3 with those of two asteroseismic samples - the largest sample from Huber et al. (2014) and the most accurate sample from Hekker et al. (2012, 2013). We find that LSP3 surface gravities are in good agreement with asteroseismic values of Hekker et al. (2012, 2013), with a dispersion of about 0.2 dex. Except for a few cases, asteroseismic surface gravities of Huber et al. (2014) and LSP3 spectroscopic values agree for a wide range of surface gravities. However, some patterns of differences can be identified upon close inspection. Potential ways to further improve the LSP3 spectroscopic estimation of stellar atmospheric parameters in the near future are briefly discussed. The effects of effective temperature and metallicity on asteroseismic determinations of surface gravities for giant stars are also discussed.
  • We report a detailed investigation of the bulk motions of the nearby Galactic stellar disk, based on three samples selected from the LSS-GAC DR2: a global sample containing 0.57 million FGK dwarfs out to $\sim$ 2 kpc, a local subset of the global sample consisting $\sim$ 5,400 stars within 150 pc, and an anti-center sample containing $\sim$ 4,400 AFGK dwarfs and red clump stars within windows of a few degree wide centered on the Galactic anti-center. The global sample is used to construct a three-dimensional map of bulk motions of the Galactic disk from the solar vicinity out to $\sim$ 2 kpc with a spatial resolution of $\sim$ 250 pc. Typical values of the radial and vertical components of bulk motion range from $-$15 km s$^{-1}$ to 15 km s$^{-1}$, while the lag behind the circular speed dominates the azimuthal component by up to $\sim$ 15 km s$^{-1}$. The map reveals spatially coherent, kpc-scale stellar flows in the disk, with typical velocities of a few tens km s$^{-1}$. Bending- and breathing-mode perturbations are clearly visible, and vary smoothly across the disk plane. Our data also reveal higher-order perturbations, such as breaks and ripples, in the profiles of vertical motion versus height. From the local sample, we find that stars of different populations exhibit very different patterns of bulk motion. Finally, the anti-center sample reveals a number of peaks in stellar number density in the line-of-sight velocity versus distance distribution, with the nearer ones apparently related to the known moving groups. The "velocity bifurcation" reported by Liu et al. (2012) at Galactocentric radii 10--11 kpc is confirmed. However, just beyond this distance, our data also reveal a new triple-peaked structure.
  • Using a sample of over 70, 000 red clump (RC) stars with $5$-$10$% distance accuracy selected from the LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (LSS-GAC), we study the radial and vertical gradients of the Galactic disk(s) mainly in the anti-center direction, covering a significant disk volume of projected Galactocentric radius $7 \leq R_{\rm GC} \leq 14$ kpc and height from the Galactic midplane $0 \leq |Z| \leq 3$ kpc. Our analysis shows that both the radial and vertical metallicity gradients are negative across much of the disk volume probed, and exhibit significant spatial variations. Near the solar circle ($7 \leq R_{\rm GC} \leq 11.5$ kpc), the radial gradient has a moderately steep, negative slope of $-0.08$ dex kpc$^{-1}$ near the midplane ($|Z| < 0.1$ kpc), and the slope flattens with increasing $|Z|$. In the outer disk ($11.5 < R_{\rm GC} \leq 14$ kpc), the radial gradients have an essentially constant, much less steep slope of $-0.01$ dex kpc $^{-1}$ at all heights above the plane, suggesting that the outer disk may have experienced an evolution path different from that of the inner disk. The vertical gradients are found to flatten largely with increasing $R_{\rm GC}$. However, the vertical gradient of the lower disk ($0 \leq |Z| \leq 1$ kpc) is found to flatten with $R_{\rm GC}$ quicker than that of the upper disk ($1 < |Z| \leq 3$ kpc). Our results should provide strong constraints on the theory of disk formation and evolution, as well as the underlying physical processes that shape the disk (e.g. gas flows, radial migration, internal and external perturbations).