• We revisit the estimation of the combined mass of the Milky Way and Andromeda (M31), which dominate the mass of the Local Group. We make use of an ensemble of 30,190 halo pairs from the Small MultiDark simulation, assuming a $\Lambda$CDM (Cosmological Constant with Cold Dark Matter) cosmology, to investigate the relationship between the bound mass and parameters characterising the orbit of the binary and their local environment with the aid of machine learning methods (artificial neural networks, ANN). Results from the ANN are most successful when information about the velocity shear is provided, which demonstrates the flexibility of machine learning to model physical phenomena and readily incorporate new information as it becomes available. The resulting estimate for the Local Group mass, when shear information is included, is $4.9 \times 10^{12} M_\odot$, with an error of $\pm0.8 \times 10^{12} M_\odot$ from the 68% uncertainty in observables, and a 68% confidence interval of $^{+1.3}_{-1.4} \times 10^{12}M_\odot$ from the intrinsic scatter from the differences between the model and simulation masses. We also consider a recently reported large transverse velocity of M31 relative to the Milky Way, and produce an alternative mass estimate of $3.6\pm0.3\pm1.4 \times 10^{12}M_\odot$. Although different methods predict similar values for the most likely mass of the LG, application of ANN compared to the Timing Argument reduces the scatter in the log mass by over half when tested on samples from the simulation.
  • Observations of the Milky Way (MW), M31, and their vicinity, known as the Local Group (LG), can provide clues about the sources of reionization. We present a suite of radiative transfer simulations based on initial conditions provided by the Constrained Local UniversE Simulations (CLUES) project that are designed to recreate the Local Universe, including a realistic MW-M31 pair and a nearby Virgo. Our box size (91 Mpc) is large enough to incorporate the relevant sources of ionizing photons for the LG. We employ a range of source models, mimicking the potential effects of radiative feedback for dark matter haloes between $10^{8}-10^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$. Although the LG mostly reionizes in an inside-out fashion, the final 40 per cent of its ionization shows some outside influence. For the LG satellites, we find no evidence that their redshift of reionization is related to the present-day mass of the satellite or the distance from the central galaxy. We find that less than 20 per cent of present-day satellites for MW and M31 have undergone any star formation prior to the end of global reionization. Approximately five per cent of these satellites could be classified as fossils, meaning the majority of star formation occurred at these early times. The more massive satellites have more cumulative star formation prior to the end of global reionization, but the scatter is significant, especially at the low-mass end. Present-day mass and distance from the central galaxy are poor predictors for the presence of ancient stellar populations in satellite galaxies.
  • We present the first model that couples high-resolution simulations of the formation of Local Group galaxies with calculations of the galactic habitable zone (GHZ), a region of space which has sufficient metallicity to form terrestrial planets without being subject to hazardous radiation. These simulations allow us to make substantial progress in mapping out the asymmetric three-dimensional GHZ and its time evolution for the Milky Way (MW) and Triangulum (M33) galaxies, as opposed to works that generally assume an azimuthally symmetric GHZ. Applying typical habitability metrics to MW and M33, we find that while a large number of habitable planets exist as close as a few kiloparsecs from the galactic centre, the probability of individual planetary systems being habitable rises as one approaches the edge of the stellar disc. Tidal streams and satellite galaxies also appear to be fertile grounds for habitable planet formation. In short, we find that both galaxies arrive at similar GHZs by different evolutionary paths, as measured by the first and third quartiles of surviving biospheres. For the Milky Way, this interquartile range begins as a narrow band at large radii, expanding to encompass much of the galaxy at intermediate times before settling at a range of 2-13kpc. In the case of M33, the opposite behaviour occurs - the initial and final interquartile ranges are quite similar, showing gradual evolution. This suggests that galaxy assembly history strongly influences the time evolution of the GHZ, which will affect the relative time lag between biospheres in different galactic locations. We end by noting the caveats involved in such studies and demonstrate that high resolution cosmological simulations will play a vital role in understanding habitability on galactic scales, provided that these simulations accurately resolve chemical evolution.