• We investigate the carrier-envelope phase and intensity dependence of the longitudinal momentum distribution of photoelectrons resulting from above-threshold ionization of argon by few-cycle laser pulses. The intensity of the pulses with a center wavelength of 750\,nm is varied in a range between $0.7 \times 10^{14}$ and $\unit[5.5 \times 10^{14}]{W/cm^2}$. Our measurements reveal a prominent maximum in the carrier-envelope phase-dependent asymmetry at photoelectron energies of 2\,$U_\mathrm{P}$ ($U_\mathrm{P}$ being the ponderomotive potential), that is persistent over the entire intensity range. Further local maxima are observed at 0.3 and 0.8\,$U_\mathrm{P}$. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical results obtained by solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Schr\"{o}dinger equation (3D TDSE). We show that for few-cycle pulses, the carrier-envelope phase-dependent asymmetry amplitude provides a reliable measure for the peak intensity on target. Moreover, the measured asymmetry amplitude exhibits an intensity-dependent interference structure at low photoelectron energy, which could be used to benchmark model potentials for complex atoms.
  • In strong laser fields, sub-femtosecond control of chemical reactions with the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) becomes feasible. We have studied the control of reaction dynamics of acetylene and allene in intense few-cycle laser pulses at 750 nm, where ionic fragments are recorded with a reaction microscope. We find that by varying the CEP and intensity of the laser pulses it is possible to steer the motion of protons in the molecular dications, enabling control over deprotonation and isomerization reactions. The experimental results are compared to predictions from a quantum dynamical model, where the control is based on the manipulation of the phases of a vibrational wave packet by the laser waveform. The measured intensity dependence in the CEP-controlled deprotonation of acetylene is well captured by the model. In the case of the isomerization of acetylene, however, we find differences in the intensity dependence between experiment and theory. For the isomerization of allene, an inversion of the CEP-dependent asymmetry is observed when the intensity is varied, which we discuss in light of the quantum dynamical model. The inversion of the asymmetry is found to be consistent with a transition from non-sequential to sequential double ionization.
  • Proton migration is a ubiquitous process in chemical reactions related to biology, combustion, and catalysis. Thus, the ability to control the movement of nuclei with tailored light, within a hydrocarbon molecule holds promise for far-reaching applications. Here, we demonstrate the steering of hydrogen migration in simple hydrocarbons, namely acetylene and allene, using waveform-controlled, few-cycle laser pulses. The rearrangement dynamics are monitored using coincident 3D momentum imaging spectroscopy, and described with a quantum-dynamical model. Our observations reveal that the underlying control mechanism is due to the manipulation of the phases in a vibrational wavepacket by the intense off-resonant laser field.
  • The dissociation of an H$_2^+$ molecular-ion beam by linearly polarized, carrier-envelope-phase-tagged 5 fs pulses at 4$\times10^{14} $W/cm$^2$ with a central wavelength of 730 nm was studied using a coincidence 3D momentum imaging technique. Carrier-envelope-phase-dependent asymmetries in the emission direction of H$^+$ fragments relative to the laser polarization were observed. These asymmetries are caused by interference of odd and even photon number pathways, where net-zero photon and 1-photon interference predominantly contributes at H$^+$+H kinetic energy releases of 0.2 -- 0.45 eV, and net-2-photon and 1-photon interference contributes at 1.65 -- 1.9 eV. These measurements of the benchmark H$_2^+$ molecule offer the distinct advantage that they can be quantitatively compared with \textit{ab initio} theory to confirm our understanding of strong-field coherent control via the carrier-envelope phase.