• Neural codes are binary codes that are used for information processing and representation in the brain. In previous work, we have shown how an algebraic structure, called the {\it neural ring}, can be used to efficiently encode geometric and combinatorial properties of a neural code [1]. In this work, we consider maps between neural codes and the associated homomorphisms of their neural rings. In order to ensure that these maps are meaningful and preserve relevant structure, we find that we need additional constraints on the ring homomorphisms. This motivates us to define {\it neural ring homomorphisms}. Our main results characterize all code maps corresponding to neural ring homomorphisms as compositions of 5 elementary code maps. As an application, we find that neural ring homomorphisms behave nicely with respect to convexity. In particular, if $\mathcal{C}$ and $\mathcal{D}$ are convex codes, the existence of a surjective code map $\mathcal{C}\rightarrow \mathcal{D}$ with a corresponding neural ring homomorphism implies that the minimal embedding dimensions satisfy $d(\mathcal{D}) \leq d(\mathcal{C})$.
  • Neural codes allow the brain to represent, process, and store information about the world. Combinatorial codes, comprised of binary patterns of neural activity, encode information via the collective behavior of populations of neurons. A code is called convex if its codewords correspond to regions defined by an arrangement of convex open sets in Euclidean space. Convex codes have been observed experimentally in many brain areas, including sensory cortices and the hippocampus, where neurons exhibit convex receptive fields. What makes a neural code convex? That is, how can we tell from the intrinsic structure of a code if there exists a corresponding arrangement of convex open sets? In this work, we provide a complete characterization of local obstructions to convexity. This motivates us to define max intersection-complete codes, a family guaranteed to have no local obstructions. We then show how our characterization enables one to use free resolutions of Stanley-Reisner ideals in order to detect violations of convexity. Taken together, these results provide a significant advance in understanding the intrinsic combinatorial properties of convex codes.
  • The neural ideal of a binary code $\mathbb{C} \subseteq \mathbb{F}_2^n$ is an ideal in $\mathbb{F}_2[x_1,\ldots, x_n]$ closely related to the vanishing ideal of $\mathbb{C}$. The neural ideal, first introduced by Curto et al, provides an algebraic way to extract geometric properties of realizations of binary codes. In this paper we investigate homomorphisms between polynomial rings $\mathbb{F}_2[x_1,\ldots, x_n]$ which preserve all neural ideals. We show that all such homomorphisms can be decomposed into a composition of three basic types of maps. Using this decomposition, we can interpret how these homomorphisms act on the underlying binary codes. We can also determine their effect on geometric realizations of these codes using sets in $\mathbb{R}^d$. We also describe how these homomorphisms affect a canonical generating set for neural ideals, yielding an efficient method for computing these generators in some cases.
  • A major area in neuroscience research is the study of how the brain processes spatial information. Neurons in the brain represent external stimuli via neural codes. These codes often arise from stereotyped stimulus-response maps, associating to each neuron a convex receptive field. An important problem consists in determining what stimulus space features can be extracted directly from a neural code. The neural ideal is an algebraic object that encodes the full combinatorial data of a neural code. This ideal can be expressed in a canonical form that directly translates to a minimal description of the receptive field structure intrinsic to the code. In here, we describe a SageMath package that contains several algorithms related to the canonical form of a neural ideal.
  • A neural code $\mathcal{C}$ is a collection of binary vectors of a given length n that record the co-firing patterns of a set of neurons. Our focus is on neural codes arising from place cells, neurons that respond to geographic stimulus. In this setting, the stimulus space can be visualized as subset of $\mathbb{R}^2$ covered by a collection $\mathcal{U}$ of convex sets such that the arrangement $\mathcal{U}$ forms an Euler diagram for $\mathcal{C}$. There are some methods to determine whether such a convex realization $\mathcal{U}$ exists; however, these methods do not describe how to draw a realization. In this work, we look at the problem of algorithmically drawing Euler diagrams for neural codes using two polynomial ideals: the neural ideal, a pseudo-monomial ideal; and the neural toric ideal, a binomial ideal. In particular, we study how these objects are related to the theory of piercings in information visualization, and we show how minimal generating sets of the ideals reveal whether or not a code is $0$, $1$, or $2$-inductively pierced.
  • Determining how the brain stores information is one of the most pressing problems in neuroscience. In many instances, the collection of stimuli for a given neuron can be modeled by a convex set in $\mathbb{R}^d$. Combinatorial objects known as \emph{neural codes} can then be used to extract features of the space covered by these convex regions. We apply results from convex geometry to determine which neural codes can be realized by arrangements of open convex sets. We restrict our attention primarily to sparse codes in low dimensions. We find that intersection-completeness characterizes realizable $2$-sparse codes, and show that any realizable $2$-sparse code has embedding dimension at most $3$. Furthermore, we prove that in $\mathbb{R}^2$ and $\mathbb{R}^3$, realizations of $2$-sparse codes using closed sets are equivalent to those with open sets, and this allows us to provide some preliminary results on distinguishing which $2$-sparse codes have embedding dimension at most $2$.
  • Neurons in the brain represent external stimuli via neural codes. These codes often arise from stimulus-response maps, associating to each neuron a convex receptive field. An important problem confronted by the brain is to infer properties of a represented stimulus space without knowledge of the receptive fields, using only the intrinsic structure of the neural code. How does the brain do this? To address this question, it is important to determine what stimulus space features can - in principle - be extracted from neural codes. This motivates us to define the neural ring and a related neural ideal, algebraic objects that encode the full combinatorial data of a neural code. We find that these objects can be expressed in a "canonical form" that directly translates to a minimal description of the receptive field structure intrinsic to the neural code. We consider the algebraic properties of homomorphisms between neural rings, which naturally relate to maps between neural codes. We show that maps between two neural codes are in bijection with ring homomorphisms between the respective neural rings, and define the notion of neural ring homomorphism, a special restricted class of ring homomorphisms which preserve neuron structure. We also find connections to Stanley-Reisner rings, and use ideas similar to those in the theory of monomial ideals to obtain an algorithm for computing the canonical form associated to any neural code, providing the groundwork for inferring stimulus space features from neural activity alone.
  • Neurons in the brain represent external stimuli via neural codes. These codes often arise from stereotyped stimulus-response maps, associating to each neuron a convex receptive field. An important problem confronted by the brain is to infer properties of a represented stimulus space without knowledge of the receptive fields, using only the intrinsic structure of the neural code. How does the brain do this? To address this question, it is important to determine what stimulus space features can - in principle - be extracted from neural codes. This motivates us to define the neural ring and a related neural ideal, algebraic objects that encode the full combinatorial data of a neural code. Our main finding is that these objects can be expressed in a "canonical form" that directly translates to a minimal description of the receptive field structure intrinsic to the code. We also find connections to Stanley-Reisner rings, and use ideas similar to those in the theory of monomial ideals to obtain an algorithm for computing the primary decomposition of pseudo-monomial ideals. This allows us to algorithmically extract the canonical form associated to any neural code, providing the groundwork for inferring stimulus space features from neural activity alone.