• We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • The Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) is a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/IR (Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared) slitless spectroscopic survey of four deep fields. Two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) area and two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) area. One of the southern fields selected is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Each of these four fields were observed using the WFC3/G102 grism (0.8$\mu m$-1.15$\mu m$ continuous coverage) with a total exposure time of 40 orbits (~ 100 kilo-seconds) per field. This reaches a 3 sigma continuum depth of ~26 AB magnitudes and probes emission lines to $\approx 10^{-17}\ erg\ s^{-1} \ cm^{-2}$. This paper details the four FIGS fields and the overall observational strategy of the project. A detailed description of the Simulation Based Extraction (SBE) method used to extract and combine over 10000 spectra of over 2000 distinct sources brighter than m_F105W=26.5 mag is provided. High fidelity simulations of the observations is shown to significantly improve the background subtraction process, the spectral contamination estimates, and the final flux calibration. This allows for the combination of multiple spectra to produce a final high quality, deep, 1D-spectra for each object in the survey.
  • We present the results from a stellar population modeling analysis of a sample of 162 z=4.5, and 14 z=5.7 Lyman alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the Bootes field, using deep Spitzer/IRAC data at 3.6 and 4.5 um from the Spitzer Lyman Alpha Survey, along with Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS and WFC3 imaging at 1.1 and 1.6 um for a subset of the LAEs. This represents one of the largest samples of high-redshift LAEs imaged with Spitzer IRAC. We find that 30/162 (19%) of the z=4.5 LAEs and 9/14 (64%) of the z=5.7 LAEs are detected at >3-sigma in at least one IRAC band. Individual z=4.5 IRAC-detected LAEs have a large range of stellar mass, from 5x10^8 to 10^11 Msol. One-third of the IRAC-detected LAEs have older stellar population ages of 100 Myr - 1 Gyr, while the remainder have ages < 100 Myr. A stacking analysis of IRAC-undetected LAEs shows this population to be primarily low mass (8 -- 20 x 10^8 Msol) and young (64 - 570 Myr). We find a correlation between stellar mass and the dust-corrected ultraviolet-based star-formation rate (SFR) similar to that at lower redshifts, in that higher mass galaxies exhibit higher SFRs. However, the z=4.5 LAE correlation is elevated 4-5 times in SFR compared to continuum-selected galaxies at similar redshifts. The exception is the most massive LAEs which have SFRs similar to galaxies at lower redshifts suggesting that they may represent a different population of galaxies than the traditional lower-mass LAEs, perhaps with a different mechanism promoting Lyman alpha photon escape.
  • We present observations of a luminous galaxy at redshift z=6.573 --- the end of the reioinization epoch --- which has been spectroscopically confirmed twice. The first spectroscopic confirmation comes from slitless HST ACS grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically), which show a dramatic continuum break in the spectrum at restframe 1216 A wavelength. The second confirmation is done with Keck + DEIMOS. The continuum is not clearly detected with ground-based spectra, but high wavelength resolution enables the Lyman alpha emission line profile to be determined. We compare the line profile to composite line profiles at redshift z=4.5. The Lyman alpha line profile shows no signature of a damping wing attenuation, confirming that the intergalactic gas is ionized at redshift z=6.57. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms, even at redshifts where Lyman alpha is too attenuated by the neutral IGM to be detectable using traditional spectroscopy from the ground.
  • We show that populations of high redshift galaxies grow more luminous as they grow in linear size. This is because the brightness per unit area has a distinct upper limit due to the self-regulating nature of star-formation. As a corollary, we show that the observed increase in characteristic luminosity of Lyman Break Galaxies (L*) with time can be explained by their increase in size, which scales as 1/H(z). In contrast, Lyman-alpha selected galaxies have a characteristic, constant, small size between redshift z=2.25 and 6.5. Coupled with a characteristic surface brightness, this can explain their non-evolving ultraviolet continuum luminosity function. This compact physical size seems to be a critical determining factor in whether a galaxy will show Lyman-alpha emission. We base these conclusions on new size measurements for a sample of about 170 Lyman-alpha selected galaxies with Hubble Space Telescope broad-band imaging, over the redshift range 2.25 < z < 6. We combine these with a similar number of Lyman-alpha selected galaxies with half-light radii from the literature, and derive surface brightnesses for the entire combined sample.
  • We present spectroscopy of 76 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) in CDF-S taken with the LDSS3 spectrograph on Magellan Telescope. These galaxies are selected to have emission lines with ACS grism data in the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) grism Survey. The ACS grism spectra cover the wavelength range 6000-9700 \AA\ and most PEARS grism redshifts are based on a single emission line + photometric redshifts from broad-band colors; the Magellan spectra cover a wavelength range from 4000 {\AA} to 9000 {\AA}, and provide a check on redshifts derived from PEARS data. We find an accuracy of $\sigma_z$ = 0.006 for the ACS grism redshifts with only one catastrophic outlier. We probe for AGN in our sample via several different methods. In total we find 7 AGNs and AGN candidates out of 76 galaxies. Two AGNs are identified from the X-ray full-band luminosity, $L_{X-ray,FB}>10^{43}$ erg$\;$s$^{-1}$, the line widths and the power-law continuum spectra. Two unobscured faint AGN candidates are identified from the X-ray full-band luminosity $L_{X-ray,FB}\sim10^{41}$ erg$\;$s$^{-1}$, the hardness ratio and the column density, and the emission-line and X-ray derived SFRs. Two candidates are classified based on the line ratio of [NII]\lambda6584/H$\alpha$ versus [OIII]$\lambda$5007/H$\beta$ (BPT diagram), which are between the empirical and theoretical demarcation curves, i.e, the transition region from star-forming galaxies to AGNs. One AGN candidate is identified from the high-ionization emission line HeII{\AA}4686.
  • The methods and techniques for the slitless spectroscopy software aXe, which was designed to reduce data from the various slitless spectroscopy modes of Hubble Space Telescope instruments, are described. aXe can treat slitless spectra from different instruments such as ACS, NICMOS and WFC3 through the use of a configuration file which contains all the instrument dependent parameters. The basis of the spectral extraction within aXe are the position, morphology and photometry of the objects on a companion direct image. Several aspects of slitless spectroscopy, such as the overlap of spectra, an extraction dependent on object shape and the provision of flat-field cubes, motivate a dedicated software package, and the solutions offered within aXe are discussed in detail. The effect of the mutual contamination of spectra can be quantitatively assessed in aXe, using spectral and morphological information from the companion direct image(s). A new method named 'aXedrizzle' for 2D rebinning and co-adding spectral data, taken with small shifts or dithers, is described. The extraction of slitless spectra with optimal weighting is outlined and the correction of spectra for detector fringing for the ACS CCD's is presented. Auxiliary software for simulating slitless data and for visualizing the results of an aXe extraction is outlined.
  • We present the faintest spectroscopically confirmed sample of redshift four and five Lyman break galaxies to date. The sample is based on slitless grism spectra of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field region from the GRAPES (Grism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science) and PEARS (Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically) projects, using the G800L grism on the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys. We report here confirmations of 39 galaxies, pre-selected as candidate Lyman break galaxies using photometric selection criteria. We compare a "traditional" V-dropout selection to a more liberal one (with V-i > 0.9), and find that the traditional criteria are about 64% complete and 81% reliable. We also study the Lyman alpha emission properties of our sample. We find that Lyman alpha emission is detected in about 1/4 of the sample, and that our broad-band color selected sample includes 55% of previously published line-selected Lyman alpha sources. Finally, we examine our stacked 2D spectra. We demonstrate that strong, spatially extended (arcsecond scale) Lyman alpha emission is not a generic property of these Lyman break galaxies, but that a modest extension of the Lyman alpha photosphere (compared to the starlight) may be present in those galaxies with prominent Lyman alpha emission.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism PEARS (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) survey provides a large dataset of low-resolution spectra from thousands of galaxies in the GOODS North and South fields. One important subset of objects in these data are emission-line galaxies (ELGs), and we have investigated several different methods aimed at systematically selecting these galaxies. Here we present a new methodology and results of a search for these ELGs in the PEARS observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) using a 2D detection method that utilizes the observation that many emission lines originate from clumpy knots within galaxies. This 2D line-finding method proves to be useful in detecting emission lines from compact knots within galaxies that might not otherwise be detected using more traditional 1D line-finding techniques. We find in total 96 emission lines in the HUDF, originating from 81 distinct "knots'' within 63 individual galaxies. We find in general that [OIII] emitters are the most common, comprising 44% of the sample, and on average have high equivalent widths (70% of [OIII] emitters having rest-frame EW>100A). There are 12 galaxies with multiple emitting knots--with different knots exhibiting varying flux values, suggesting that the differing star formation properties across a single galaxy can in general be probed at redshifts z~0.2-0.4. The most prevalent morphologies are large face-on spirals and clumpy interacting systems, many being unique detections owing to the 2D method described here, thus highlighting the strength of this technique.
  • High redshift galaxies selected on the basis of their strong Lyman-alpha emission tend to be young ages and small physical sizes. We show this by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of 9 Lyman-alpha emitting (LAE) galaxies at 4.0 < z < 5.7 n the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF). Rest-frame UV to optical 700A < lambda < 7500A luminosities, or upper limits, are used to constrain old stellar populations. We derive best fit, as well as maximally massive and maximally old, properties of all 9 objects. We show that these faint and distant objects are all very young, being most likely only a few millions years old, and not massive, the mass in stars being ~10^6-10^8 M_sun. Deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations of these objects, even in cases where objects were not detected, were crucial in constraining the masses of these objects. The space density of these objects, ~1.25x10^-4 Mpc^-3 is comparable to previously reported space density of LAEs at moderate to high redshifts. These Lyman-alpha galaxies show modest star formation rates of ~8 M_sun yr^-1, which is nevertheless strong enough to have allowed these galaxies to assemble their stellar mass in less than a few x10^6 years. These sources appear to have small physical sizes, usually smaller than 1 Kpc, and are also rather concentrated. They are likely to be some of the least massive and youngest high redshift galaxies observed to date.
  • We present redshifts for 115 emission line objects in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) identified through the GRism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) project using the slitless grism spectroscopy mode of the ACS Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The sample was selected by an emission line search on all extracted 1-dimensional GRAPES spectra. We identify the emission lines using line wavelength ratios where multiple lines are detected in the grism wavelength range (5800A < lambda < 9600A), and using photometric redshift information where multiple lines are unavailable. We then derive redshifts using the identified lines. Our redshifts are accurate to delta(z) = 0.009, based on both statistical uncertainty estimates and comparison with published ground-based spectra. Over 40% of our sample is fainter than typical magnitude limits for ground-based spectroscopy (with i_{AB}>25 mag). Such emission lines would likely remain undiscovered without our deep survey. The emission line objects fall into 3 categories: 1) Most are low to moderate redshift galaxies (0 < z < 2), including many actively star forming galaxies with strong HII regions; 2) 9 are high redshift (4 < z < 7) Lyman-alpha emitters; and 3) at least 3 are candidate AGNs.
  • We examine the stellar populations of a sample of 98 redshift 4.5 Lyman alpha emitting galaxies using their broadband colors derived from deep photometry at the MMT. These galaxies were selected by narrowband excess from the Large Area Lyman Alpha survey. Twenty-two galaxies are detected in two or more of our MMT filters (g', r', i' and z'). By comparing broad and narrowband colors of these galaxies to synthetic colors from stellar population models, we determine their ages and stellar masses. The highest equivalent width objects have an average age of 4 Myr, consistent with ongoing star formation. The lowest EW objects show an age of 40 - 200 Myr, consistent with the expectation that larger numbers of stars are causing low EWs. We found masses ranging from 2e7 solar masses for the youngest objects in the sample to 2e9 solar masses for the oldest. It is possible that dust effects could produce large equivalent widths even in older populations by allowing the Lyman alpha photons to escape, even while the continuum is extinguished, and we present models for this scenario also.
  • We have discovered an extended Lyman alpha plume associated with a compact source at redshift 5.4 in slitless spectroscopic data from the Grism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) project. The spatial extent of the emission is about 6 x 1.5 kpc (1 x 0.25 arcsec). Combining our grism data and the broadband images from the Hubble UltraDeep Field (UDF) images, we find a Lyman alpha line flux of 2e-17 erg/cm2/s and surface brightness 7e-17 erg/cm2/s/arcsec2. The UDF images show diffuse continuum emission associated with the Lyman alpha plume (hereafter UDF 5225), with three embedded knots. The morphology of UDF 5225 is highly suggestive of a galaxy in assembly. It is moreover possible that the prominent Lyman alpha emission from this object is due to an active nucleus, and that we are seeing the simultaneous growth through accretion of a galaxy and its central black hole. Followup observations at higher spectral resolution could test this hypothesis.
  • IR and Radio band observations of heavily extinguished regions in starburst galaxies suggest a very high SN rate associated with such regions. Optically measured supernova (SN) rates may therefore underestimate the total SN rate by factors of up to 10, due to the high extinction to SNe in starburst regions. The IR/radio SN rates come from a variety of indirect means, however, which suffer from model dependence and other problems. We describe a direct measurement of the SN rate from a regular patrol of starburst galaxies done with K' band imaging to minimize the effects of extinction. A collection of K' measurements of core-collapse SNe near maximum light is presented. Results of a preliminary SN search using the MIRC camera at the Wyoming IR Observatory (WIRO), and an improved search using the ORCA optics are described. A monthly patrol of starburst galaxies within 25 Mpc should yield 1.6 - 9.6 SNe/year. Our MIRC search with low-resolution (2.2" pixels) failed to find extinguished SNe, limiting the SN rate outside the nucleus (at > 15" radius) to less than 3.8 Supernova Rate Units (SRU or SNe/century/10^10 L(solar); 90% confidence). The MIRC camera had insufficient resolution to search nuclear starburst regions, where SN activity is concentrated, explaining why we found no heavily obscured SNe. We conclude that high-resolution, small field SN searches in starburst nuclei are more productive than low resolution, large-field searches, even for our large galaxies. With our ORCA high-resolution optics, we could limit the total SN rate to < 1.3 SRU at 90% confidence in 3 years of observations, lower than the most pessimistic estimate.