• F. Acero, J.-T. Acquaviva, R. Adam, N. Aghanim, M. Allen, M. Alves, R. Ammanouil, R. Ansari, A. Araudo, E. Armengaud, B. Ascaso, E. Athanassoula, D. Aubert, S. Babak, A. Bacmann, A. Banday, K. Barriere, F. Bellossi, J.-P. Bernard, M. G. Bernardini, M. Béthermin, E. Blanc, L. Blanchet, J. Bobin, S. Boissier, C. Boisson, A. Boselli, A. Bosma, S. Bosse, S. Bottinelli, F. Boulanger, R. Boyer, A. Bracco, C. Briand, M. Bucher, V. Buat, L. Cambresy, M. Caillat, J.-M. Casandjian, E. Caux, S. Célestin, M. Cerruti, P. Charlot, E. Chassande-Mottin, S. Chaty, N. Christensen, L. Ciesla, N. Clerc, J. Cohen-Tanugi, I. Cognard, F. Combes, B. Comis, S. Corbel, B. Cordier, M. Coriat, R. Courtin, H. Courtois, B. Da Silva, E. Daddi, R. Dallier, E. Dartois, K. Demyk, J.-M. Denis, L. Denis, A. Djannati-Ataï, J.-F. Donati, M. Douspis, W. van Driel, M. N. El Korso, E. Falgarone, A. Fantina, T. Farges, A. Ferrari, C. Ferrari, K. Ferrière, R. Flamary, N. Gac, S. Gauffre, F. Genova, J. Girard, I. Grenier, J.-M. Griessmeier, P. Guillard, L. Guillemot, F. Gulminelli, A. Gusdorf, E. Habart, F. Hammer, P. Hennebelle, F. Herpin, O. Hervet, A. Hughes, O. Ilbert, M. Janvier, E. Josselin, A. Julier, C. Lachaud, G. Lagache, R. Lallement, S. Lambert, L. Lamy, M. Langer, P. Larzabal, G. Lavaux, T. Le Bertre, O. Le Fèvre, A. Le Tiec, B. Lefloch, M. Lehnert, M. Lemoine-Goumard, F. Levrier, M. Limousin, D. Lis, A. López-Sepulcre, J. Macias-Perez, C. Magneville, A. Marcowith, J. Margueron, G. Marquette, D. Marshall, L. Martin, D. Mary, S. Masson, S. Maurogordato, C. Mazauric, Y. Mellier, M.-A. Miville-Deschênes, L. Montier, F. Mottez, D. Mourard, N. Nesvadba, J.-F. Nezan, P. Noterdaeme, J. Novak, P. Ocvirk, M. Oertel, X. Olive, V. Ollier, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, M. Pandey-Pommier, Y. Pennec, M. Pérault, C. Peroux, P. Petit, J. Pétri, A. Petiteau, J. Pety, G. W. Pratt, M. Puech, B. Quertier, E. Raffin, S. Rakotozafy Harison, S. Rawson, M. Renaud, B. Revenu, C. Richard, J. Richard, F. Rincon, I. Ristorcelli, J. Rodriguez, M. Schultheis, C. Schimd, B. Semelin, H. Sol, J.-L. Starck, M. Tagger, C. Tasse, G. Theureau, S. Torchinsky, C. Vastel, S. D. Vergani, L. Verstraete, X. Vigouroux, N. Vilmer, J.-P. Vilotte, N. Webb, N. Ysard, P. Zarka
    March 28, 2018 astro-ph.IM
    The "Square Kilometre Array" (SKA) is a large international radio telescope project characterised, as suggested by its name, by a total collecting area of approximately one square kilometre, and consisting of several interferometric arrays to observe at metric and centimetric wavelengths. The deployment of the SKA will take place in two sites, in South Africa and Australia, and in two successive phases. From its Phase 1, the SKA will be one of the most formidable scientific machines ever deployed by mankind, and by far the most impressive in terms of data throughput and required computing power. With the participation of almost 200 authors from forty research institutes and six private companies, the publication of this French SKA white paper illustrates the strong involvement in the SKA project of the French astronomical community and of a rapidly growing number of major scientific and technological players in the fields of Big Data, high performance computing, energy production and storage, as well as system integration.
  • Using spectroscopic observations taken for the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS) we report here on the discovery of PCl J1001+0220, a massive proto-cluster located at $z_{spec}\sim4.57$ in the COSMOS field. The proto-cluster was initially detected as a $\sim12\sigma$ overdensity of typical star-forming galaxies in the blind spectroscopic survey of the early universe ($2<z<6$) performed by VUDS. It was further mapped using a new technique developed that statistically combines spectroscopic and photometric redshifts, the latter derived from a recent compilation of deep multi-band imaging. Through various methods, the descendant halo mass of PCl J1001+0220 is estimated to be $\log(M_{h}/M_{\odot})_{z=0}\sim14.5-15$ with a large amount of mass apparently already in place at $z\sim4.57$. Tentative evidence is found for a fractional excess of older and more massive galaxies within the proto-cluster, an observation which suggests the pervasive early onset of vigorous star formation. No evidence is found for the differences in the star formation rates of member and a matched sample of coeval field galaxies either through rest-frame ultraviolet methods or through stacking extremely deep Very Large Array 3 GHz imaging. Additionally, no evidence for pervasive strong active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity is observed. Analysis of Hubble Space Telescope images provides weak evidence for for an elevated incidence of galaxy-galaxy interaction within the proto-cluster. The spectral properties of the two samples are compared, with a definite suppression of Ly$\alpha$ seen in the average member galaxy relative to the coeval field ($f_{esc,Ly\alpha}=1.8^{+0.3}_{-1.7}$% and $4.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}$%, respectively). This observation along with other lines of evidence leads us to infer the possible presence of a large, cool diffuse medium within the proto-cluster environment evocative of a nascent intracluster medium.
  • This paper describes the observations and the first data release (DR1) of the ESO public spectroscopic survey "VANDELS, a deep VIMOS survey of the CANDELS CDFS and UDS fields". VANDELS' main targets are star-forming galaxies at 2.4<z<5.5 and massive passive galaxies at 1<z<2.5. By adopting a strategy of ultra-long exposure times, from 20 to 80 hours per source, VANDELS is designed to be the deepest ever spectroscopic survey of the high-redshift Universe. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the VIMOS spectrograph, the survey has obtained ultra-deep spectra covering the wavelength 4800-10000 A with sufficient signal-to-noise to investigate the astrophysics of high-redshift galaxy evolution via detailed absorption line studies. The VANDELS-DR1 is the release of all spectra obtained during the first season of observations and includes data for galaxies for which the total (or half of the total) scheduled integration time was completed. The release contains 879 individual objects with a measured redshift and includes fully wavelength and flux-calibrated 1D spectra, the associated error spectra, sky spectra and wavelength-calibrated 2D spectra. We also provide a catalog with the essential galaxy parameters, including spectroscopic redshifts and redshift quality flags. In this paper we present the survey layout and observations, the data reduction and redshift measurement procedure and the general properties of the VANDELS-DR1 sample. We also discuss the spectroscopic redshift distribution, the accuracy of the photometric redshifts and we provide some examples of data products. All VANDELS-DR1 data are publicly available and can be retrieved from the ESO archive. Two further data releases are foreseen in the next 2 years with a final release scheduled for June 2020 which will include improved re-reduction of the entire spectroscopic data set. (abridged)
  • VANDELS is a uniquely-deep spectroscopic survey of high-redshift galaxies with the VIMOS spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The survey has obtained ultra-deep optical (0.48 < lambda < 1.0 micron) spectroscopy of ~2100 galaxies within the redshift interval 1.0 < z < 7.0, over a total area of ~0.2 sq. degrees centred on the CANDELS UDS and CDFS fields. Based on accurate photometric redshift pre-selection, 85% of the galaxies targeted by VANDELS were selected to be at z>=3. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the refurbished VIMOS spectrograph, the fundamental aim of the survey is to provide the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra necessary to measure key physical properties such as stellar population ages, masses, metallicities and outflow velocities from detailed absorption-line studies. Using integration times calculated to produce an approximately constant signal-to-noise ratio (20 < t_int < 80 hours), the VANDELS survey targeted: a) bright star-forming galaxies at 2.4 < z < 5.5, b) massive quiescent galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.5, c) fainter star-forming galaxies at 3.0 < z < 7.0 and d) X-ray/Spitzer-selected active galactic nuclei and Herschel-detected galaxies. By targeting two extragalactic survey fields with superb multi-wavelength imaging data, VANDELS will produce a unique legacy data set for exploring the physics underpinning high-redshift galaxy evolution. In this paper we provide an overview of the VANDELS survey designed to support the science exploitation of the first ESO public data release, focusing on the scientific motivation, survey design and target selection.
  • To identify the galaxies responsible for the reionization of the Universe, we must rely on the investigation of the Lyman Continuum (LyC) properties of z<5 star-forming galaxies, where we can still directly observe their ionizing radiation. We selected a sample of 201 star-forming galaxies from the Vimos Ultra Deep Survey at 3.5<z<4.3 to explore the validity of some of the proposed indirect indicators of LyC radiation. We created subsamples of galaxies with EWLya>70{\AA}, Lya(ext)<5.7kpc, rUV<0.3kpc and |Dv Lya|<200km/s, stacked all the galaxies in each subsample and measured the flux density ratio fnu(895)/fnu(1470), that we consider to be a proxy for LyC emission. We compared these ratios to those obtained for the complementary samples. We find that the stacks of galaxies which are UV compact (rUV<0.3kpc) and have bright Lya emission (EWLya>70{\AA}), have much higher LyC fluxes compared to the rest of the galaxy population in agreement with theoretical studies and previous observational works. We also find that galaxies with low Lya(ext) have the highest LyC flux: this new correlation seems even stronger than the correlations with high EWLya and small rUV. These results assume that the stacks from all the subsamples present the same statistical contamination from lower redshift interlopers. If we subtract a statistical contamination from low redshift interlopers obtained with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations, from the flux density ratios (fnu(895)/fnu(1470)) of the significant subsamples we find that these samples contain real LyC leaking flux with a very high probability, but the true average escape fractions remain uncertain. Our work indicates that galaxies with very high EWLya, small Lya(ext) and small rUV are very likely the best candidates to show LyC radiation at z=4 and could therefore be the galaxies that contributed more to reionization.
  • We present a new approach to automate the spectroscopic redshift reliability assessment based on machine learning (ML) and characteristics of the redshift probability density function (PDF). We propose to rephrase the spectroscopic redshift estimation into a Bayesian framework, in order to incorporate all sources of information and uncertainties related to the redshift estimation process, and produce a redshift posterior PDF that will be the starting-point for ML algorithms to provide an automated assessment of a redshift reliability. As a use case, public data from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey is exploited to present and test this new methodology. We first tried to reproduce the existing reliability flags using supervised classification to describe different types of redshift PDFs, but due to the subjective definition of these flags, soon opted for a new homogeneous partitioning of the data into distinct clusters via unsupervised classification. After assessing the accuracy of the new clusters via resubstitution and test predictions, unlabelled data from preliminary mock simulations for the Euclid space mission are projected into this mapping to predict their redshift reliability labels.
  • Context: Ultraviolet (UV) emission-line spectra are used to spectroscopically confirm high-z galaxies and increasingly also to determine their physical properties. Aims: To interpret the observed UV spectra of distant galaxies in terms of the dominant radiation field and the physical condition of the interstellar medium. Methods: We construct a large grid of photoionization models and derive new spectral UV line diagnostics using equivalent widths (EWs) of CIII]1909, CIV1549 and the line ratios of CIII], CIV, and HeII1640 recombination lines. We apply these diagnostics to a sample of 450 CIII]-emitting galaxies at z=2-4 previously identified in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey. Results: We show that the average star-forming galaxy (EW(CIII])~2A) is well described by stellar photoionization from single and binary stars. The inferred metallicity and ionization parameter is typically Z=0.3-0.5Zsun and logU=-2.7 to -3, in agreement with earlier works at similar redshifts. The models also indicate an average age of 50-200Myr since the beginning of the current star-formation, and an ionizing photon production rate, xi_ion, of log(xi_ion/[Hz/erg])~25.3-25.4. Among the sources with EW(CIII])=10-20A, ~30% are likely dominated by AGNs. Their derived metallicity is low, Z=0.02-0.2Zsun, and the ionization parameter higher (logU=-1.7). To explain the average UV observations of the strongest but rarest CIII] emitters (EW(CIII])>20A), we find that stellar photoionization is clearly insufficient. A radiation field consisting of a mix of a young stellar population (log(xi_ion/[Hz/erg])~25.7) plus an AGN component is required. Furthermore an enhanced C/O abundance ratio is needed for metallicities Z=0.1-0.2Zsun and logU=-1.7 to -1.5. Conclusions: The UV diagnostics we propose should serve as an important basis for the interpretation of observations of high-redshift galaxies. [abridged]
  • Using an unconventional single line diagnostic that unambiguously identifies AGNs in composite galaxies we report statistical differences in the properties (stellar age, [OII] luminosity, colour) between active and inactive galaxies at 0.62<z<1.2 extracted from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The nuclear activity is probed by the high-ionization [NeV] emission line and along with their parent samples, the galaxies are properly selected according to their stellar mass, redshift, and colour distributions. We report younger underlying stellar ages and higher [OII] luminosities of active galaxies in the green valley and in the blue cloud compared to control samples. We observe higher fractions of green galaxies hosting AGN activity at progressively bluer (r-K) colours. Depending on the location of the host galaxy in the NUVrK colour diagram we find higher AGN fractions in massive blue galaxies and in the least massive red galaxies, in agreement with the picture that black holes vary their properties when hosted in either star-forming or passive galaxies. Exactly where the fast quenching processes are expected to play a role, we identify a novel class of active galaxies in the blue cloud with signatures typical for a suddenly suppression of their star formation activity after a burst happening in the recent past. Their optical spectra resemble those of post-starburst galaxies, that would never be identified in a spectroscopic search using classical selection techniques. Broadly, these active galaxies selected on the [NeV] line are not commonly represented in shallow X-ray, mid-IR, or classical line diagnostics. If we consider that our results are limited by the shallow observational limits and rapid AGN variability, the impact of AGN feedback on galaxy formation and evolution may represent an important channel of fast-transiting galaxies moving to the red sequence.
  • We present the study of the dependence of galaxy clustering on luminosity and stellar mass in the redshift range 2$<$z$<$3.5 using 3236 galaxies with robust spectroscopic redshifts from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS). We measure the two-point real-space correlation function $w_p(r_p)$ for four volume-limited stellar mass and four luminosity, M$_{UV}$ absolute magnitude selected, sub-samples. We find that the scale dependent clustering amplitude $r_0$ significantly increases with increasing luminosity and stellar mass indicating a strong galaxy clustering dependence on these properties. This corresponds to a strong relative bias between these two sub-samples of $\Delta$b/b$^*$=0.43. Fitting a 5-parameter HOD model we find that the most luminous and massive galaxies occupy the most massive dark matter haloes with $\langle$M$_h$$\rangle$ = 10$^{12.30}$ h$^{-1}$ M$_{\odot}$. Similar to the trends observed at lower redshift, the minimum halo mass M$_{min}$ depends on the luminosity and stellar mass of galaxies and grows from M$_{min}$ =10$^{9.73}$ h$^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$ to M$_{min}$=10$^{11.58}$ h$^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$ from the faintest to the brightest among our galaxy sample, respectively. We find the difference between these halo masses to be much more pronounced than is observed for local galaxies of similar properties. Moreover, at z~3, we observe that the masses at which a halo hosts, on average, one satellite and one central galaxy is M$_1$$\approx$4M$_{min}$ over all luminosity ranges, significantly lower than observed at z~0 indicating that the halo satellite occupation increases with redshift. The luminosity and stellar mass dependence is also reflected in the measurements of the large scale galaxy bias, which we model as b$_{g,HOD}$($>$L)=1.92+25.36(L/L$^*$)$^{7.01}$. We conclude our study with measurements of the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR).
  • We use the VIPERS final data release to investigate the performance of colour-selected populations of galaxies as tracers of linear large-scale motions. We empirically select volume-limited samples of blue and red galaxies as to minimise the systematic error on the estimate of the growth rate $f\sigma_8$ from the anisotropy of the two-point correlation function. To this end, rather than rigidly splitting the sample into two colour classes we define the red/blue fractional contribution of each object through a weight based on the $(U-V)$ colour distribution. Using mock surveys that are designed to reproduce the observed properties of VIPERS galaxies, we find the systematic error in recovering the fiducial value of $f\sigma_8$ to be minimized when using a volume-limited sample of luminous blue galaxies. We model non-linear corrections via the Scoccimarro extension of the Kaiser model, finding systematic errors on $f\sigma_8$ of below $1-2\%$, using scales as small as 5 $h^{-1}\mathrm{Mpc}$. We interpret this result as indicating that selection of luminous blue galaxies maximises the fraction that are central objects in their dark matter haloes; this in turn minimises the contribution to the measured $\xi(r_p,\pi)$ from the 1-halo term, which is dominated by non-linear motions. The gain is inferior if one uses the full magnitude-limited sample of blue objects, consistent with the presence of a significant fraction of blue, fainter satellites dominated by non-streaming, orbital velocities. We measure a value of $f\sigma_8=0.45 \pm 0.11$ over the single redshift range $0.6\le z\le 1.0$, corresponding to an effective redshift for the blue galaxies $\left<z\right>=0.85$. Including in the likelihood the potential extra information contained in the blue-red galaxy cross-correlation function does not lead to an appreciable improvement in the error bars, while it increases the systematic error.
  • (Abridged) The properties of stellar clumps in star forming galaxies and their evolution over the redshift range $2\lesssim z \lesssim 6$ are presented and discussed in the context of the build-up of massive galaxies at early cosmic times. We use HST/ACS images of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) to identify clumps within a 20 kpc radius. We find that the population of galaxies with more than one clump is dominated by galaxies with two clumps, representing $\sim21-25$\% of the population, while the fraction of galaxies with 3, or 4 and more, clumps is 8-11 and 7-9\%, respectively. The fraction of clumpy galaxies is in the range $\sim35-55\%$ over $2<z<6$, increasing at higher redshifts, indicating that the fraction of irregular galaxies remains high up to the highest redshifts. The large and bright clumps (M$_{\star}\sim10^9$ up to $\sim10^{10}$M$_\odot$) are found to reside predominantly in galaxies with two clumps. Smaller and lower luminosity clumps ($\log_{10}\left(M_{\star}/\mathrm{M_\odot}\right)<9$) are found in galaxies with three clumps or more. We interpret these results as evidence for two different modes of clump formation working in parallel. The small low luminosity clumps are likely the result of disc fragmentation, with violent disc instabilities (VDI) forming several long-lived clumps in-situ, as suggested from simulations. A fraction of these clumps is also likely coming from minor mergers. The clumps in the dominating population of galaxies with two clumps are significantly more massive and have properties akin to those in merging pairs observed at similar redshifts; they appear as more massive than the most massive clumps observed in VDI numerical simulations.
  • We carry out a joint analysis of redshift-space distortions and galaxy-galaxy lensing, with the aim of measuring the growth rate of structure; this is a key quantity for understanding the nature of gravity on cosmological scales and late-time cosmic acceleration. We make use of the final VIPERS redshift survey dataset, which maps a portion of the Universe at a redshift of $z \simeq 0.8$, and the lensing data from the CFHTLenS survey over the same area of the sky. We build a consistent theoretical model that combines non-linear galaxy biasing and redshift-space distortion models, and confront it with observations. The two probes are combined in a Bayesian maximum likelihood analysis to determine the growth rate of structure at two redshifts $z=0.6$ and $z=0.86$. We obtain measurements of $f\sigma_8(0.6) = 0.48 \pm 0.12$ and $f\sigma_8(0.86) = 0.48 \pm 0.10$. The additional galaxy-galaxylensing constraint alleviates galaxy bias and $\sigma_8$ degeneracies, providing direct measurements of $[f(0.6),\sigma_8(0.6)] = [0.93 \pm 0.22, 0.52 \pm 0.06]$ and $f(0.86),\sigma_8(0.86)] = [0.99 \pm 0.19, 0.48 \pm 0.04]$. These measurements are statistically consistent with a Universe where the gravitational interactions can be described by General Relativity, although they are not yet accurate enough to rule out some commonly considered alternatives. Finally, as a complementary test we measure the gravitational slip parameter, $E_G$ , for the first time at $z>0.6$. We find values of $\smash{\overline{E}_G}(0.6) = 0.16 \pm 0.09$ and $\smash{\overline{E}_G}(0.86) = 0.09 \pm 0.07$, when $E_G$ is averaged over scales above $3 h^{-1} \rm{Mpc}$. We find that our $E_G$ measurements exhibit slightly lower values than expected for standard relativistic gravity in a {\Lambda}CDM background, although the results are consistent within $1-2\sigma$.
  • We study a large galaxy sample from the Spitzer Matching Survey of the UltraVISTA ultra-deep Stripes (SMUVS) to search for sources with enhanced 3.6 micron fluxes indicative of strong Halpha emission at z=3.9-4.9. We find that the percentage of "Halpha excess" sources reaches 37-40% for galaxies with stellar masses log10(M*/Msun) ~ 9-10, and decreases to <20% at log10(M*/Msun) ~ 10.7. At higher stellar masses, however, the trend reverses, although this is likely due to AGN contamination. We derive star formation rates (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR) from the inferred Halpha equivalent widths (EW) of our "Halpha excess" galaxies. We show, for the first time, that the "Halpha excess" galaxies clearly have a bimodal distribution on the SFR-M* plane: they lie on the main sequence of star formation (with log10(sSFR/yr^{-1})<-8.05) or in a starburst cloud (with log10(sSFR/yr^{-1}) >-7.60). The latter contains ~15% of all the objects in our sample and accounts for >50% of the cosmic SFR density at z=3.9-4.9, for which we derive a robust lower limit of 0.066 Msun yr^{-1} Mpc^{-3}. Finally, we identify an unusual >50sigma overdensity of z=3.9-4.9 galaxies within a 0.20 x 0.20 sq. arcmin region. We conclude that the SMUVS unique combination of area and depth at mid-IR wavelengths provides an unprecedented level of statistics and dynamic range which are fundamental to reveal new aspects of galaxy evolution in the young Universe.
  • Fast and energetic winds are invoked by galaxy formation models as essential processes in the evolution of galaxies. These outflows can be powered either by star-formation and/or AGN activity, but the relative dominance of the two mechanisms is still under debate. We use spectroscopic stacking analysis to study the properties of the low-ionization phase of the outflow in a sample of 1330 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and 79 X-ray detected (42<log(L_X)<45 erg/s) Type 2 AGN at 1.7<z<4.6 selected from a compilation of deep optical spectroscopic surveys, mostly zCOSMOS-Deep and VUDS. We measure mean velocity offsets of -150 km/s in the SFGs while in the AGN sample the velocity is much higher (-950 km/s), suggesting that the AGN is boosting the outflow up to velocities that could not be reached only with the star- formation contribution. The sample of X-ray AGN has on average a lower SFR than non-AGN SFGs of similar mass: this, combined with the enhanced outflow velocity in AGN hosts, is consistent with AGN feedback in action. We further divide our sample of AGN into two X-ray luminosity bins: we measure the same velocity offsets in both stacked spectra, at odds with results reported for the highly ionized phase in local AGN, suggesting that the two phases of the outflow may be mixed only up to relatively low velocities, while the highest velocities can be reached only by the highly ionized phase.
  • We selected a sample of 76 Lya emitting galaxies from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) at 2<z<4. We estimated the velocity of the neutral gas flowing out of the interstellar medium as the velocity offset, Deltav, between the systemic redshift (zsys) and the center of low-ionization absorption line systems (LIS). To increase the SN of VUDS spectra, we stacked subsamples. We measured the systemic redshift from the rest-frame UV spectroscopic data using the CIII]1908 nebular emission line, and we considered SiII1526 as the highest signal-to-noise LIS line. We calculated the Lya peak shift with respect to the zsys, the EW(Lya), and the Lya spatial extension, Ext(Lya-C), from the profiles in the 2D stacked spectra. The galaxies that are faint in the rest-frame UV continuum, strong in Lya and CIII], with compact UV morphology, and localized in an underdense environment are characterized by outflow velocities of the order of a few hundreds of km/sec. The subsamples with smaller Deltav are characterized by larger Lya peak shifts, larger Ext(Lya-C), and smaller EW(Lya). In general we find that EW(Lya) anti-correlates with Ext(Lya-C) and Lya peak shift. We interpret these trends using a radiative-transfer shell model. The model predicts that an HI gas with a column density larger than 10^20/cm^2 is able to produce Lya peak shifts larger than >300km/sec. An ISM with this value of NHI would favour a large amount of scattering events, especially when the medium is static, so it can explain large values of Ext(Lya-C) and small EW(Lya). On the contrary, an ISM with a lower NHI, but large velocity outflows would lead to a Lya spatial profile peaked at the galaxy center (i.e. low values of Ext(Lya-C)) and to a large EW(Lya), as we see in our data. Our results and their interpretation via radiative-transfer models tell us that it is possible to use Lya to study the properties of the HI gas.
  • Imaging with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow for observing the bulk of distant galaxies at the epoch of reionisation. The recovery of their properties, such as age, color excess E(B-V), specific star formation rate (sSFR) and stellar mass, will mostly rely on spectral energy distribution fitting, based on the data provided by JWST's two imager cameras, namely the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and the Mid Infrared Imager (MIRI). In this work we analyze the effect of choosing different combinations of NIRCam and MIRI broad-band filters, from 0.6 {\mu}m to 7.7 {\mu}m, on the recovery of these galaxy properties. We performed our tests on a sample of 1542 simulated galaxies, with known input properties, at z=7-10. We found that, with only 8 NIRCam broad-bands, we can recover the galaxy age within 0.1 Gyr and the color excess within 0.06 mag for 70% of the galaxies. Besides, the stellar masses and sSFR are recovered within 0.2 and 0.3 dex, respectively, at z=7-9. Instead, at z=10, no NIRCam band traces purely the {\lambda}> 4000 {\AA} regime and the percentage of outliers in stellar mass (sSFR) increases by > 20% (> 90%), in comparison to z=9. The MIRI F560W and F770W bands are crucial to improve the stellar mass and the sSFR estimation at z=10. When nebular emission lines are present, deriving correct galaxy properties is challenging, at any redshift and with any band combination. In particular, the stellar mass is systematically overestimated in up to 0.3 dex on average with NIRCam data alone and including MIRI observations improves only marginally the estimation.
  • We use the final catalogue of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) to measure the power spectrum of the galaxy distribution at high redshift, presenting results that extend beyond $z=1$ for the first time. We apply an FFT technique to four independent sub-volumes comprising a total of $51,728$ galaxies at $0.6<z<1.1$ (out of the nearly $90,000$ included in the whole survey). We concentrate here on the shape of the direction-averaged power spectrum in redshift space, explaining the level of modelling of redshift-space anisotropies and the anisotropic survey window function that are needed to deduce this in a robust fashion. We then use covariance matrices derived from a large ensemble of mock datasets in order to fit the spectral data. The results are well matched by a standard $\Lambda$CDM model, with density parameter $\Omega_M h =\smash{0.227^{+0.063}_{-0.050}}$ and baryon fraction $\smash{f_B=\Omega_B/\Omega_M=0.220^{+0.058}_{-0.072}}$. These inferences from the high-$z$ galaxy distribution are consistent with results from local galaxy surveys, and also with the Cosmic Microwave Background. Thus the $\Lambda$CDM model gives a good match to cosmic structure at all redshifts so far accessible to observational study.
  • We measure the stellar mass function (SMF) of galaxies in the COSMOS field up to $z\sim6$. We select them in the near-IR bands of the COSMOS2015 catalogue, which includes ultra-deep photometry from UltraVISTA-DR2, SPLASH, and Subaru/Hyper-SuprimeCam. At $z>2.5$ we use new precise photometric redshifts with error $\sigma_z=0.03(1+z)$ and an outlier fraction of $12\%$, estimated by means of the unique spectroscopic sample of COSMOS. The increased exposure time in the DR2, along with our panchromatic detection strategy, allow us to improve the stellar mass completeness at high $z$ with respect to previous UltraVISTA catalogues. We also identify passive galaxies through a robust colour-colour selection, extending their SMF estimate up to $z=4$. Our work provides a comprehensive view of galaxy stellar mass assembly between $z=0.1$ and 6, for the first time using consistent estimates across the entire redshift range. We fit these measurements with a Schechter function, correcting for Eddington bias. We compare the SMF fit with the halo mass function predicted from $\Lambda$CDM simulations. We find that at $z>3$ both functions decline with a similar slope in the high-mass end. This feature could be explained assuming that the mechanisms that quench star formation in massive haloes become less effective at high redshift; however further work needs to be done to confirm this scenario. Concerning the SMF low-mass end, it shows a progressive steepening as moving towards higher redshifts, with $\alpha$ decreasing from $-1.47_{-0.02}^{+0.02}$ at $z\simeq0.1$ to $-2.11_{-0.13}^{+0.30}$ at $z\simeq5$. This slope depends on the characterisation of the observational uncertainties, which is crucial to properly remove the Eddington bias. We show that there is currently no consensus on the method to quantify such errors: different error models result in different best-fit Schechter parameters. [Abridged]
  • The three-point correlation function (3PCF) is a powerful probe to investigate the clustering of matter in the Universe in a complementary way with respect to lower-order statistics, providing additional information with respect to the two-point correlation function and allowing us to shed light on biasing, nonlinear processes, and deviations from Gaussian statistics. In this paper, we analyse the first data release of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), determining the dependence of the three-point correlation function on luminosity and stellar mass at $z=[0.5,1.1]$. We exploit the VIPERS Public Data Release 1, consisting of more than 50,000 galaxies with B-band magnitudes in the range $-21.6\lesssim M_{\rm B}-5\log(h)\lesssim-19.9$ and stellar masses in the range $9.8\lesssim\log(M_\star[h^{-2}\,M_\odot])\lesssim 10.7$. We measure both the connected 3PCF and the reduced 3PCF in redshift space, probing different configurations and scales, in the range $2.5<r\,$[Mpc/h]$<20$. We find a significant dependence of the reduced 3PCF on scales and triangle shapes, with stronger anisotropy at larger scales ($r\sim10$ Mpc/h) and an almost flat trend at smaller scales, $r\sim2.5$ Mpc/h. Massive and luminous galaxies present a larger connected 3PCF, while the reduced 3PCF is remarkably insensitive to magnitude and stellar masses in the range we explored. These trends, already observed at low redshifts, are confirmed for the first time to be still valid up to $z=1.1$, providing support to the hierarchical scenario for which massive and bright systems are expected to be more clustered. The possibility of using the measured 3PCF to provide independent constraints on the linear galaxy bias $b$ has also been explored, showing promising results in agreement with other probes.
  • We examine the behaviour of the infrared-radio correlation (IRRC) over the range $0<z<6$ using new, highly sensitive 3GHz observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and infrared data from the Herschel Space Observatory in the 2deg$^{2}$ COSMOS field. We distinguish between objects where emission is believed to arise solely from star-formation, and those where an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is thought to be present. We account for non-detections in the radio or in the infrared using a doubly-censored survival analysis. We find that the IRRC of star-forming galaxies, quantified by the infrared-to-1.4GHz radio luminosity ratio ($q_{\rm TIR}$), decreases with increasing redshift: $q_{\rm TIR}(z)=(2.88\pm0.03)(1+z)^{-0.19\pm0.01}$. Moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN do not follow the same $q_{\rm TIR}$$(z)$ trend, having a lower normalisation and steeper decrease with redshift. We cannot rule out the possibility that unidentified AGN contributions only to the radio regime may be steepening the observed $q_{\rm TIR}(z)$ trend of the star-forming population. An increasing fractional contribution to the observed 3GHz flux by free-free emission of star-forming galaxies may also affect the derived evolution. However, we find that the standard (M82-based) assumption of the typical radio spectral energy distribution (SED) for star-forming galaxies is inconsistent with our results. This suggests a more complex shape of the typical radio SED for star-forming galaxies, and that imperfect $K$ corrections in the radio may govern the derived redshift trend of $q_{\rm TIR}$. Lastly, we present a redshift-dependent relation between rest-frame 1.4GHz radio luminosity and star formation rate taking the derived redshift trend into account.
  • (abridged) We study the composition of the faint radio population selected from the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project. The survey covers a 2.6sq.deg. area with a mean rms of ~2.3uJy/b, cataloging 10830 sources (>5sigma). Combining these radio data with optical, near-infrared (UltraVISTA), mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) data, and X-ray data (Chandra), we find counterparts to radio sources for ~93% of the radio sample (in the areas of the COSMOS field not affected by saturated or bright sources in the optical to NIR bands), reaching out to z<6. We further classify the sources as star forming galaxies or AGN based on various criteria, such as X-ray luminosity, observed MIR color, UV-FIR spectral-energy distribution, rest-frame NUV-optical color corrected for dust extinction, and radio-excess relative to that expected from the hosts' star-formation rate. We separate the AGN into sub-samples dominated by low-to-moderate and moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN, candidates for high-redshift analogues to local low- and high-excitation emission line AGN, respectively. We study the fractional contributions of these sub-populations down to radio flux levels of ~11uJy at 3GHz (or ~20uJy at 1.4GHz assuming a spectral index of -0.7). We find that the dominant fraction at 1.4GHz flux densities above ~200uJy is constituted of low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN. Below densities of ~100uJy the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases to ~60%, followed by the moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN (~20%), and low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN (~20%). Based on this observational evidence, we extrapolate the fractions down to sensitivities of the SKA. Our estimates suggest that at the faint flux limits to be reached by the SKA1 surveys, a selection based only on radio flux limits can provide a simple tool to efficiently identify samples highly (>75%) dominated by star-forming galaxies.
  • We explore the multiwavelength properties of AGN host galaxies for different classes of radio-selected AGN out to z$\lesssim$6 via a multiwavelength analysis of about 7700 radio sources in the COSMOS field. The sources were selected with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz (10 cm) within the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project, and cross-matched with multiwavelength ancillary data. This is the largest sample of high-redshift (z$\lesssim$6) radio sources with exquisite photometric coverage and redshift measurements available. We constructed a sample of moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN (HLAGN) via spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition combined with standard X-ray and mid-infrared diagnostics. Within the remainder of the sample we further identified low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN (MLAGN) via excess in radio emission relative to the star formation rates in their host galaxies. We show that AGN power in HLAGN occurs predominantly in radiative form, while MLAGN display a substantial mechanical AGN luminosity component. We found significant differences in the host properties of the two AGN classes, as a function of redshift. At z$<$1.5, MLAGN appear to reside in significantly more massive and less star-forming galaxies compared to HLAGN. At z$>$1.5, we observed a reversal in the behaviour of the stellar mass distributions with the HLAGN populating the higher stellar mass tail. We interpret this finding as a possible hint of the downsizing of galaxies hosting HLAGN, with the most massive galaxies triggering AGN activity earlier than less massive galaxies, and then fading to MLAGN at lower redshifts. Our conclusion is that HLAGN and MLAGN samples trace two distinct galaxy and AGN populations in a wide range of redshifts, possibly resembling the radio AGN types often referred to as radiative- and jet-mode (or high- and low-excitation), respectively.
  • We make use of the deep Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) COSMOS radio observations at 3 GHz to infer radio luminosity functions of star-forming galaxies up to redshifts of z~5 based on approximately 6000 detections with reliable optical counterparts. This is currently the largest radio-selected sample available out to z~5 across an area of 2 square degrees with a sensitivity of rms=2.3 ujy/beam. By fixing the faint and bright end shape of the radio luminosity function to the local values, we find a strong redshift trend that can be fitted with a pure luminosity evolution L~(1+z)^{(3.16 +- 0.2)-(0.32 +- 0.07) z}. We estimate star formation rates (SFRs) from our radio luminosities using an infrared (IR)-radio correlation that is redshift dependent. By integrating the parametric fits of the evolved luminosity function we calculate the cosmic SFR density (SFRD) history since z~5. Our data suggest that the SFRD history peaks between 2<z<3 and that the ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; 100 Msol/yr<SFR<1000 Msol/yr) contribute up to ~25% to the total SFRD in the same redshift range. Hyperluminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs; SFR>1000 Msol/yr) contribute an additional <2% in the entire observed redshift range. We find evidence of a potential underestimation of SFRD based on ultraviolet (UV) rest-frame observations of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at high redshifts (z>4) on the order of 15-20%, owing to appreciable star formation in highly dust-obscured galaxies, which might remain undetected in such UV observations.
  • [Abridged] We use the final data of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) to investigate the effect of environment on the evolution of galaxies between $z=0.5$ and $z=0.9$. We characterise local environment in terms of the density contrast smoothed over a cylindrical kernel, the scale of which is defined by the distance to the $5^{th}$ nearest neighbour. We find that more massive galaxies tend to reside in higher-density environments over the full redshift range explored. Defining star-forming and passive galaxies through their (NUV$-r$) vs ($r-K$) colours, we then quantify the fraction of star-forming over passive galaxies, $f_{\rm ap}$, as a function of environment at fixed stellar mass. $f_{\rm ap}$ is higher in low-density regions for galaxies with masses ranging from $\log(\mathcal{M}/\mathcal{M}_\odot)=10.38$ (the lowest value explored) to at least $\log(\mathcal{M}/\mathcal{M}_\odot)\sim11.3$, although with decreasing significance going from lower to higher masses. This is the first time that environmental effects on high-mass galaxies are clearly detected at redshifts as high as $z\sim0.9$. We compared these results to VIPERS-like galaxy mock catalogues based on the galaxy formation model of De Lucia & Blaizot. The model correctly reproduces $f_{\rm ap}$ in low-density environments, but underpredicts it at high densities. The discrepancy is particularly strong for the lowest-mass bins. We find that this discrepancy is driven by an excess of low-mass passive satellite galaxies in the model. Looking at the accretion history of these model galaxies, i.e. the times when they become satellites, a better (yet not perfect) agreement with observations can be obtained in high density regions by assuming either that a not-negligible fraction of satellites is destroyed, or that their quenching time-scale is longer than $\sim 2$ Gyr.
  • We present measurements of the growth rate of cosmological structure from the modelling of the anisotropic galaxy clustering measured in the final data release of the VIPERS survey. The analysis is carried out in configuration space and based on measurements of the first two even multipole moments of the anisotropic galaxy auto-correlation function, in two redshift bins spanning the range $0.5 < z < 1.2$. We provide robust and cosmology-independent corrections for the VIPERS angular selection function, allowing recovery of the underlying clustering amplitude at the percent level down to the Mpc scale. We discuss several improvements on the non-linear modelling of redshift-space distortions (RSD) and perform detailed tests of a variety of approaches against a set of realistic VIPERS-like mock realisations. This includes using novel fitting functions to describe the velocity divergence and density power spectra $P_{\theta\theta}$ and $P_{\delta\theta}$ that appear in RSD models. These tests show that we are able to measure the growth rate with negligible bias down to separations of $5h^{-1}Mpc$. Interestingly, the application to real data shows a weaker sensitivity to the details of non-linear RSD corrections compared to mock results. We obtain consistent values for the growth rate times the matter power spectrum normalisation parameter of $f\sigma_8=0.55\pm 0.12$ and $0.40\pm0.11$ at effective redshifts of $z = 0.6$ and $z=0.86$ respectively. These results are in agreement with standard cosmology predictions assuming Einstein gravity in a $\Lambda \rm{CDM}$ background.