• Single photon laser enabled Auger decay (spLEAD) has been redicted theoretically [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 083004 (2013)] and here we report its first experimental observation in neon. Using coherent, bichromatic free-electron laser pulses, we have detected the process and coherently controlled the angular distribution of the emitted electrons by varying the phase difference between the two laser fields. Since spLEAD is highly sensitive to electron correlation, this is a promising method for probing both correlation and ultrafast hole migration in more complex systems.
  • XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) produce short wavelength pulses with high intensity, ultrashort duration, well-defined polarization and transverse coherence, and have been utilised for many experiments previously possible at long wavelengths only: multiphoton ionization, pumping an atomic laser, and four-wave mixing spectroscopy. However one important optical technique, coherent control, has not yet been demonstrated, because Self- Amplified Spontaneous Emission FELs have limited longitudinal coherence. Single-colour pulses from the FERMI seeded FEL are longitudinally coherent, and two-colour emission is predicted to be coherent. Here we demonstrate the phase correlation of two colours, and manipulate it to control an experiment. Light of wavelengths 63.0 and 31.5 nm ionized neon, and the asymmetry of the photoelectron angular distribution was controlled by adjusting the phase, with temporal resolution 3 attoseconds. This opens the door to new shortwavelength coherent control experiments with ultrahigh time resolution and chemical sensitivity.
  • Organic chromophores with heteroatoms possess an important excited state relaxation channel from an optically allowed {\pi}{\pi}* to a dark n{\pi}*state. We exploit the element and site specificity of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to selectively follow the electronic change during the {\pi}{\pi}*/n{\pi}* internal conversion. As a hole forms in the n orbital during {\pi}{\pi}*/n{\pi}* internal conversion, the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum at the heteroatom K-edge exhibits an additional resonance. We demonstrate the concept with the nucleobase thymine, a prototypical heteroatomic chromophore. With the help of time resolved NEXAFS spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge, we unambiguously show that {\pi}{\pi}*/n{\pi}* internal conversion takes place within (60 \pm 30) fs. High-level coupled cluster calculations on the isolated molecules used in the experiment confirm the superb electronic structure sensitivity of this new method for excited state investigations.
  • Free electron lasers (FELs) offer the unprecedented capability to study reaction dynamics and image the structure of complex systems. When multiple photons are absorbed in complex systems, a plasma-like state is formed where many atoms are ionized on a femtosecond timescale. If multiphoton absorption is resonantly-enhanced, the system becomes electronically-excited prior to plasma formation, with subsequent decay paths which have been scarcely investigated to date. Here, we show using helium nanodroplets as an example that these systems can decay by a new type of process, named collective autoionization. In addition, we show that this process is surprisingly efficient, leading to ion abundances much greater than that of direct single-photon ionization. This novel collective ionization process is expected to be important in many other complex systems, e.g. macromolecules and nanoparticles, exposed to high intensity radiation fields.
  • The adsorption of cytosine on the Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces has been studied using both aqueous deposition and evaporation in vacuum to prepare the samples. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) were used to determine the electronic structure and orientation of the adsorbates. In addition, three derivatives of cytosine, 6-azacytosine, 6-azacytidine and 5- azacytidine, were studied. Monolayer films of the latter three samples were adsorbed on Au(111) from aqueous solution, and the nature of bonding was determined. Spectra have been interpreted in the light of published calculations of free cytosine molecules and new ab initio calculations of the other compounds. Surface core level shifts of Au 4f imply that all of these compounds are chemisorbed. Cytosine adsorbs as a single tautomer, but in two chemical states with different surface-molecule bonding. For deposition in vacuum, a flat-lying molecular state bonded through the N(3) atom of the pyrimidine ring dominates, but a second state is also present. For deposition from solution, the second state dominates, with the molecular plane no longer parallel to the surface. This state also bonds through the N(3) atom, but in addition interacts with the surface via the amino group. Two tautomers of 6-azacytosine were observed, and they and 6-azacytidine adsorb with similar geometries, chemically bonding via the azacytosine ring. The ribose ring does not appear to perturb the adsorption of azacytidine compared with azacytosine. The azacytosine ring is nearly but not perfectly parallel to the surface, like 5-azacytidine, which adsorbs as an imino tautomer. ...