• Given a graph $F$, let $I(F)$ be the class of graphs containing $F$ as an induced subgraph. Let $W[F]$ denote the minimum $k$ such that $I(F)$ is definable in $k$-variable first-order logic. The recognition problem of $I(F)$, known as Induced Subgraph Isomorphism (for the pattern graph $F$), is solvable in time $O(n^{W[F]})$. Motivated by this fact, we are interested in determining or estimating the value of $W[F]$. Using Olariu's characterization of paw-free graphs, we show that $I(K_3+e)$ is definable by a first-order sentence of quantifier depth 3, where $K_3+e$ denotes the paw graph. This provides an example of a graph $F$ with $W[F]$ strictly less than the number of vertices in $F$. On the other hand, we prove that $W[F]=4$ for all $F$ on 4 vertices except the paw graph and its complement. If $F$ is a graph on $t$ vertices, we prove a general lower bound $W[F]>(1/2-o(1))t$, where the function in the little-o notation approaches 0 as $t$ inreases. This bound holds true even for a related parameter $W^*[F]\le W[F]$, which is defined as the minimum $k$ such that $I(F)$ is definable in the infinitary logic $L^k_{\infty\omega}$. We show that $W^*[F]$ can be strictly less than $W[F]$. Specifically, $W^*[P_4]=3$ for $P_4$ being the path graph on 4 vertices. Using the lower bound for $W[F]$, we also obtain a succintness result for existential monadic second-order logic: A usage of just one monadic quantifier sometimes reduces the first-order quantifier depth at a super-recursive rate.
  • Let $v(F)$ denote the number of vertices in a fixed connected pattern graph $F$. We show an infinite family of patterns $F$ such that the existence of a subgraph isomorphic to $F$ is expressible by a first-order sentence of quantifier depth $\frac23\,v(F)+1$, assuming that the host graph is sufficiently large and connected. On the other hand, this is impossible for any $F$ with using less than $\frac23\,v(F)-2$ first-order variables.
  • Let $F$ be a connected graph with $\ell$ vertices. The existence of a subgraph isomorphic to $F$ can be defined in first-order logic with quantifier depth no better than $\ell$, simply because no first-order formula of smaller quantifier depth can distinguish between the complete graphs $K_\ell$ and $K_{\ell-1}$. We show that, for some $F$, the existence of an $F$ subgraph in \emph{sufficiently large} connected graphs is definable with quantifier depth $\ell-3$. On the other hand, this is never possible with quantifier depth better than $\ell/2$. If we, however, consider definitions over connected graphs with sufficiently large treewidth, the quantifier depth can for some $F$ be arbitrarily small comparing to $\ell$ but never smaller than the treewidth of $F$. Moreover, the definitions over highly connected graphs require quantifier depth strictly more than the density of $F$. Finally, we determine the exact values of these descriptive complexity parameters for all connected pattern graphs $F$ on 4 vertices.
  • It is well known that any graph admits a crossing-free straight-line drawing in $\mathbb{R}^3$ and that any planar graph admits the same even in $\mathbb{R}^2$. For a graph $G$ and $d \in \{2,3\}$, let $\rho^1_d(G)$ denote the minimum number of lines in $\mathbb{R}^d$ that together can cover all edges of a drawing of $G$. For $d=2$, $G$ must be planar. We investigate the complexity of computing these parameters and obtain the following hardness and algorithmic results. - For $d\in\{2,3\}$, we prove that deciding whether $\rho^1_d(G)\le k$ for a given graph $G$ and integer $k$ is ${\exists\mathbb{R}}$-complete. - Since $\mathrm{NP}\subseteq{\exists\mathbb{R}}$, deciding $\rho^1_d(G)\le k$ is NP-hard for $d\in\{2,3\}$. On the positive side, we show that the problem is fixed-parameter tractable with respect to $k$. - Since ${\exists\mathbb{R}}\subseteq\mathrm{PSPACE}$, both $\rho^1_2(G)$ and $\rho^1_3(G)$ are computable in polynomial space. On the negative side, we show that drawings that are optimal with respect to $\rho^1_2$ or $\rho^1_3$ sometimes require irrational coordinates. - Let $\rho^2_3(G)$ be the minimum number of planes in $\mathbb{R}^3$ needed to cover a straight-line drawing of a graph $G$. We prove that deciding whether $\rho^2_3(G)\le k$ is NP-hard for any fixed $k \ge 2$. Hence, the problem is not fixed-parameter tractable with respect to $k$ unless $\mathrm{P}=\mathrm{NP}$.
  • We investigate the problem of drawing graphs in 2D and 3D such that their edges (or only their vertices) can be covered by few lines or planes. We insist on straight-line edges and crossing-free drawings. This problem has many connections to other challenging graph-drawing problems such as small-area or small-volume drawings, layered or track drawings, and drawing graphs with low visual complexity. While some facts about our problem are implicit in previous work, this is the first treatment of the problem in its full generality. Our contribution is as follows. We show lower and upper bounds for the numbers of lines and planes needed for covering drawings of graphs in certain graph classes. In some cases our bounds are asymptotically tight; in some cases we are able to determine exact values. We relate our parameters to standard combinatorial characteristics of graphs (such as the chromatic number, treewidth, maximum degree, or arboricity) and to parameters that have been studied in graph drawing (such as the track number or the number of segments appearing in a drawing). We pay special attention to planar graphs. For example, we show that there are planar graphs that can be drawn in 3-space on a lot fewer lines than in the plane.
  • The isomorphism problem is known to be efficiently solvable for interval graphs, while for the larger class of circular-arc graphs its complexity status stays open. We consider the intermediate class of intersection graphs for families of circular arcs that satisfy the Helly property. We solve the isomorphism problem for this class in logarithmic space. If an input graph has a Helly circular-arc model, our algorithm constructs it canonically, which means that the models constructed for isomorphic graphs are equal.
  • Color refinement is a classical technique used to show that two given graphs G and H are non-isomorphic; it is very efficient, although it does not succeed on all graphs. We call a graph G amenable to color refinement if it succeeds in distinguishing G from any non-isomorphic graph H. Tinhofer (1991) explored a linear programming approach to Graph Isomorphism and defined compact graphs: A graph is compact if its fractional automorphisms polytope is integral. Tinhofer noted that isomorphism testing for compact graphs can be done quite efficiently by linear programming. However, the problem of characterizing and recognizing compact graphs in polynomial time remains an open question. Our results are summarized below: - We show that amenable graphs are recognizable in time O((n + m)logn), where n and m denote the number of vertices and the number of edges in the input graph. - We show that all amenable graphs are compact. - We study related combinatorial and algebraic graph properties introduced by Tinhofer and Godsil. The corresponding classes of graphs form a hierarchy and we prove that recognizing each of these graph classes is P-hard. In particular, this gives a first complexity lower bound for recognizing compact graphs.
  • Given a connected graph $G$ and its vertex $x$, let $U_x(G)$ denote the universal cover of $G$ obtained by unfolding $G$ into a tree starting from $x$. Let $T=T(n)$ be the minimum number such that, for graphs $G$ and $H$ with at most $n$ vertices each, the isomorphism of $U_x(G)$ and $U_y(H)$ surely follows from the isomorphism of these rooted trees truncated at depth $T$. Motivated by applications in theory of distributed computing, Norris [Discrete Appl. Math. 1995] asks if $T(n)\le n$. We answer this question in the negative by establishing that $T(n)=(2-o(1))n$. Our solution uses basic tools of finite model theory such as a bisimulation version of the Immerman-Lander 2-pebble counting game. The graphs $G_n$ and $H_n$ we construct to prove the lower bound for $T(n)$ also show some other tight lower bounds. Both having $n$ vertices, $G_n$ and $H_n$ can be distinguished in 2-variable counting logic only with quantifier depth $(1-o(1))n$. It follows that color refinement, the classical procedure used in isomorphism testing and other areas for computing the coarsest equitable partition of a graph, needs $(1-o(1))n$ rounds to achieve color stabilization on each of $G_n$ and $H_n$. Somewhat surprisingly, this number of rounds is not enough for color stabilization on the disjoint union of $G_n$ and $H_n$, where $(2-o(1))n$ rounds are needed.
  • A graph $G$ is 3-colorable if and only if it maps homomorphically to the complete 3-vertex graph $K_3$. The last condition can be checked by a $k$-consistency algorithm where the parameter $k$ has to be chosen large enough, dependent on $G$. Let $W(G)$ denote the minimum $k$ sufficient for this purpose. For a non-3-colorable graph $G$, $W(G)$ is equal to the minimum $k$ such that $G$ can be distinguished from $K_3$ in the $k$-variable existential-positive first-order logic. We define the dynamic width of the 3-colorability problem as the function $W(n)=\max_G W(G)$, where the maximum is taken over all non-3-colorable $G$ with $n$ vertices. The assumption $\mathrm{NP}\ne\mathrm{P}$ implies that $W(n)$ is unbounded. Indeed, a lower bound $W(n)=\Omega(\log\log n/\log\log\log n)$ follows unconditionally from the work of Nesetril and Zhu on bounded treewidth duality. The Exponential Time Hypothesis implies a much stronger bound $W(n)=\Omega(n/\log n)$ and indeed we unconditionally prove that $W(n)=\Omega(n)$. In fact, an even stronger statement is true: A first-order sentence distinguishing any 3-colorable graph on $n$ vertices from any non-3-colorable graph on $n$ vertices must have $\Omega(n)$ variables. On the other hand, we observe that $W(G)\le 3\,\alpha(G)+1$ and $W(G)\le n-\alpha(G)+1$ for every non-3-colorable graph $G$ with $n$ vertices, where $\alpha(G)$ denotes the independence number of $G$. This implies that $W(n)\le\frac34\,n+1$, improving on the trivial upper bound $W(n)\le n$. We also show that $W(G)>\frac1{16}\, g(G)$ for every non-3-colorable graph $G$, where $g(G)$ denotes the girth of $G$. Finally, we consider the function $W(n)$ over planar graphs and prove that $W(n)=\Theta(\sqrt n)$ in the case.
  • We present a logspace algorithm that constructs a canonical intersection model for a given proper circular-arc graph, where `canonical' means that models of isomorphic graphs are equal. This implies that the recognition and the isomorphism problems for this class of graphs are solvable in logspace. For a broader class of concave-round graphs, that still possess (not necessarily proper) circular-arc models, we show that those can also be constructed canonically in logspace. As a building block for these results, we show how to compute canonical models of circular-arc hypergraphs in logspace, which are also known as matrices with the circular-ones property. Finally, we consider the search version of the Star System Problem that consists in reconstructing a graph from its closed neighborhood hypergraph. We solve it in logspace for the classes of proper circular-arc, concave-round, and co-convex graphs.
  • A circular-arc hypergraph $H$ is a hypergraph admitting an arc ordering, that is, a circular ordering of the vertex set $V(H)$ such that every hyperedge is an arc of consecutive vertices. An arc ordering is tight if, for any two hyperedges $A$ and $B$ such that $A$ is a nonempty subset of $B$ and $B$ is not equal to $V(H)$, the corresponding arcs share a common endpoint. We give sufficient conditions for $H$ to have, up to reversing, a unique arc ordering and a unique tight arc ordering. These conditions are stated in terms of connectedness properties of $H$. It is known that $G$ is a proper circular-arc graph exactly when its closed neighborhood hypergraph $N[G]$ admits a tight arc ordering. We explore connectedness properties of $N[G]$ and prove that, if $G$ is a connected, twin-free, proper circular-arc graph with non-bipartite complement, then $N[G]$ has, up to reversing, a unique arc ordering. If the complement of $G$ is bipartite and connected, then $N[G]$ has, up to reversing, two tight arc orderings. As a corollary, we notice that in both of the two cases $G$ has an essentially unique intersection representation. The last result also follows from the work by Deng, Hell, and Huang based on a theory of local tournaments.
  • Given two structures $G$ and $H$ distinguishable in $\fo k$ (first-order logic with $k$ variables), let $A^k(G,H)$ denote the minimum alternation depth of a $\fo k$ formula distinguishing $G$ from $H$. Let $A^k(n)$ be the maximum value of $A^k(G,H)$ over $n$-element structures. We prove the strictness of the quantifier alternation hierarchy of $\fo 2$ in a strong quantitative form, namely $A^2(n)\ge n/8-2$, which is tight up to a constant factor. For each $k\ge2$, it holds that $A^k(n)>\log_{k+1}n-2$ even over colored trees, which is also tight up to a constant factor if $k\ge3$. For $k\ge 3$ the last lower bound holds also over uncolored trees, while the alternation hierarchy of $\fo 2$ collapses even over all uncolored graphs. We also show examples of colored graphs $G$ and $H$ on $n$ vertices that can be distinguished in $\fo 2$ much more succinctly if the alternation number is increased just by one: while in $\Sigma_{i}$ it is possible to distinguish $G$ from $H$ with bounded quantifier depth, in $\Pi_{i}$ this requires quantifier depth $\Omega(n^2)$. The quadratic lower bound is best possible here because, if $G$ and $H$ can be distinguished in $\fo k$ with $i$ quantifier alternations, this can be done with quantifier depth $n^{2k-2}$.
  • We discuss the definability of finite graphs in first-order logic with two relation symbols for adjacency and equality of vertices. The logical depth $D(G)$ of a graph $G$ is equal to the minimum quantifier depth of a sentence defining $G$ up to isomorphism. The logical width $W(G)$ is the minimum number of variables occurring in such a sentence. The logical length $L(G)$ is the length of a shortest defining sentence. We survey known estimates for these graph parameters and discuss their relations to other topics (such as the efficiency of the Weisfeiler-Lehman algorithm in isomorphism testing, the evolution of a random graph, quantitative characteristics of the zero-one law, or the contribution of Frank Ramsey to the research on Hilbert's Entscheidungsproblem). Also, we trace the behavior of the descriptive complexity of a graph as the logic becomes more restrictive (for example, only definitions with a bounded number of variables or quantifier alternations are allowed) or more expressible (after powering with counting quantifiers).
  • Establishing arc consistency on two relational structures is one of the most popular heuristics for the constraint satisfaction problem. We aim at determining the time complexity of arc consistency testing. The input structures $G$ and $H$ can be supposed to be connected colored graphs, as the general problem reduces to this particular case. We first observe the upper bound $O(e(G)v(H)+v(G)e(H))$, which implies the bound $O(e(G)e(H))$ in terms of the number of edges and the bound $O((v(G)+v(H))^3)$ in terms of the number of vertices. We then show that both bounds are tight up to a constant factor as long as an arc consistency algorithm is based on constraint propagation (like any algorithm currently known). Our argument for the lower bounds is based on examples of slow constraint propagation. We measure the speed of constraint propagation observed on a pair $G,H$ by the size of a proof, in a natural combinatorial proof system, that Spoiler wins the existential 2-pebble game on $G,H$. The proof size is bounded from below by the game length $D(G,H)$, and a crucial ingredient of our analysis is the existence of $G,H$ with $D(G,H)=\Omega(v(G)v(H))$. We find one such example among old benchmark instances for the arc consistency problem and also suggest a new, different construction.
  • We consider straight line drawings of a planar graph $G$ with possible edge crossings. The \emph{untangling problem} is to eliminate all edge crossings by moving as few vertices as possible to new positions. Let $fix(G)$ denote the maximum number of vertices that can be left fixed in the worst case. In the \emph{allocation problem}, we are given a planar graph $G$ on $n$ vertices together with an $n$-point set $X$ in the plane and have to draw $G$ without edge crossings so that as many vertices as possible are located in $X$. Let $fit(G)$ denote the maximum number of points fitting this purpose in the worst case. As $fix(G)\le fit(G)$, we are interested in upper bounds for the latter and lower bounds for the former parameter. For each $\epsilon>0$, we construct an infinite sequence of graphs with $fit(G)=O(n^{\sigma+\epsilon})$, where $\sigma<0.99$ is a known graph-theoretic constant, namely the shortness exponent for the class of cubic polyhedral graphs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of graphs with $fit(G)=o(n)$. On the other hand, we prove that $fix(G)\ge\sqrt{n/30}$ for all $G$ with tree-width at most 2. This extends the lower bound obtained by Goaoc et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry 42:542-569 (2009)] for outerplanar graphs. Our upper bound for $fit(G)$ is based on the fact that the constructed graphs can have only few collinear vertices in any crossing-free drawing. To prove the lower bound for $fix(G)$, we show that graphs of tree-width 2 admit drawings that have large sets of collinear vertices with some additional special properties.
  • Given a planar graph $G$, we consider drawings of $G$ in the plane where edges are represented by straight line segments (which possibly intersect). Such a drawing is specified by an injective embedding $\pi$ of the vertex set of $G$ into the plane. We prove that a wheel graph $W_n$ admits a drawing $\pi$ such that, if one wants to eliminate edge crossings by shifting vertices to new positions in the plane, then at most $(2+o(1))\sqrt n$ of all $n$ vertices can stay fixed. Moreover, such a drawing $\pi$ exists even if it is presupposed that the vertices occupy any prescribed set of points in the plane. Similar questions are discussed for other families of planar graphs.
  • We prove that if one wants to make a plane graph drawing straight-line then in the worst case one has to move almost all vertices.
  • Let $D$ denote a disk of unit area. We call a subset $A$ of $D$ perfect if it has measure 1/2 and, with respect to any axial symmetry of $D$, the maximal symmetric subset of $A$ has measure 1/4. We call a curve $\beta$ in $D$ an yin-yang line if $\beta$ splits $D$ into two congruent perfect sets, $\beta$ crosses each concentric circle of $D$ twice, $\beta$ crosses each radius of $D$ once. We prove that Fermat's spiral is a unique yin-yang line in the class of smooth curves algebraic in polar coordinates.
  • We show that the Double Coset Membership problem for permutation groups possesses perfect zero-knowledge proofs.
  • We design a perfect zero-knowledge proof system for recognition if two permutation groups are conjugate.
  • Being motivated by John Tantalo's Planarity Game, we consider straight line plane drawings of a planar graph $G$ with edge crossings and wonder how obfuscated such drawings can be. We define $obf(G)$, the obfuscation complexity of $G$, to be the maximum number of edge crossings in a drawing of $G$. Relating $obf(G)$ to the distribution of vertex degrees in $G$, we show an efficient way of constructing a drawing of $G$ with at least $obf(G)/3$ edge crossings. We prove bounds $(\delta(G)^2/24-o(1))n^2 < \obf G <3 n^2$ for an $n$-vertex planar graph $G$ with minimum vertex degree $\delta(G)\ge 2$. The shift complexity of $G$, denoted by $shift(G)$, is the minimum number of vertex shifts sufficient to eliminate all edge crossings in an arbitrarily obfuscated drawing of $G$ (after shifting a vertex, all incident edges are supposed to be redrawn correspondingly). If $\delta(G)\ge 3$, then $shift(G)$ is linear in the number of vertices due to the known fact that the matching number of $G$ is linear. However, in the case $\delta(G)\ge2$ we notice that $shift(G)$ can be linear even if the matching number is bounded. As for computational complexity, we show that, given a drawing $D$ of a planar graph, it is NP-hard to find an optimum sequence of shifts making $D$ crossing-free.
  • A function $f$ of a graph is called a complete graph invariant if the isomorphism of graphs $G$ and $H$ is equivalent to the equality $f(G)=f(H)$. If, in addition, $f(G)$ is a graph isomorphic to $G$, then $f$ is called a canonical form for graphs. Gurevich proves that graphs have a polynomial-time computable canonical form exactly when they have a polynomial-time computable complete invariant. We extend this equivalence to the polylogarithmic-time model of parallel computation for classes of graphs with bounded rigidity index and for classes of graphs with small separators. In particular, our results apply to three representative classes of graphs embeddable into a fixed surface, namely, to 5-connected graphs, to 3-connected graphs admitting a polyhedral embedding, and 3-connected graphs admitting a large-edge-width embedding. Another application covers graphs with bounded treewidth. Since in the latter case an NC complete-invariant algorithm is known, we conclude that graphs of bounded treewidth have a canonical form (and even a canonical labeling) computable in NC.
  • The logical depth of a graph $G$ is the minimum quantifier depth of a first order sentence defining $G$ up to isomorphism in the language of the adjacency and the equality relations. We consider the case that $G$ is a dissection of a convex polygon or, equivalently, a biconnected outerplanar graph. We bound the logical depth of a such $G$ from above by a function of combinatorial parameters of the dual tree of $G$.
  • We prove that every triconnected planar graph is definable by a first order sentence that uses at most 15 variables and has quantifier depth at most $11\log_2 n+43$. As a consequence, a canonic form of such graphs is computable in $AC^1$ by the 14-dimensional Weisfeiler-Lehman algorithm. This provides another way to show that the planar graph isomorphism is solvable in $AC^1$.
  • Our starting point is the observation that if graphs in a class C have low descriptive complexity in first order logic, then the isomorphism problem for C is solvable by a fast parallel algorithm (essentially, by a simple combinatorial algorithm known as the multidimensional Weisfeiler-Lehman algorithm). Using this approach, we prove that isomorphism of graphs of bounded treewidth is testable in TC1, answering an open question posed by Chandrasekharan. Furthermore, we obtain an AC1 algorithm for testing isomorphism of rotation systems (combinatorial specifications of graph embeddings). The AC1 upper bound was known before, but the fact that this bound can be achieved by the simple Weisfeiler-Lehman algorithm is new. Combined with other known results, it also yields a new AC1 isomorphism algorithm for planar graphs.