• Localisation of gamma-ray interaction points in monolithic scintillator crystals can simplify the design and improve the performance of a future Compton telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. In this paper we compare the position resolution of three monolithic scintillators: a 28x28x20 mm3 (length x breadth x thickness) LaBr3:Ce crystal, a 25x25x20 mm3 CeBr3 crystal and a 25x25x10 mm3 CeBr3 crystal. Each crystal was encapsulated and coupled to an array of 4x4 silicon photomultipliers through an optical window. The measurements were conducted using 81 keV and 356 keV gamma-rays from a collimated 133Ba source. The 3D position reconstruction of interaction points was performed using artificial neural networks trained with experimental data. Although the position resolution was significantly better for the thinner crystal, the 20 mm thick CeBr3 crystal showed an acceptable resolution of about 5.4 mm FWHM for the x and y coordinates, and 7.8 mm FWHM for the z-coordinate (crystal depth) at 356 keV. These values were obtained from the full position scans of the crystal sides. The position resolution of the LaBr3:Ce crystal was found to be considerably worse, presumably due to the highly diffusive optical in- terface between the crystal and the optical window of the enclosure. The energy resolution (FWHM) measured for 662 keV gamma-rays was 4.0% for LaBr3:Ce and 5.5% for CeBr3. The same crystals equipped with a PMT (Hamamatsu R6322-100) gave an energy resolution of 3.0% and 4.7%, respectively.
  • We have compiled the most comprehensive burst sample from magnetar 4U 0142+61, comprising 27 bursts from its three burst-active episodes in 2011, 2012 and the latest one in 2015 observed with Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM. Bursts from 4U 0142+61 morphologically resemble typical short bursts from other magnetars. However, 4U 0142+61 bursts are less energetic compared to the bulk of magnetar bursts. We uncovered an extended tail emission following a burst on 2015 February 28, with a thermal nature, cooling over a time-scale of several minutes. During this tail emission, we also uncovered pulse peak phase aligned X-ray bursts , which could originate from the same underlying mechanism as that of the extended burst tail, or an associated and spatially coincident but different mechanism.
  • Two energetic hard X-ray bursts have recently triggered the Fermi and Swift space observatories from the rotation powered pulsar, PSR J1119-6127. We have performed in depth spectral and temporal analyses of these two events. Our extensive searches in both observatory data for lower luminosity bursts uncovered 10 additional events from the source. We report here on the timing and energetics of the 12 bursts from PSR J1119-6127 during its burst active phase of 2016 July 26 and 28. We also found a spectral softer X-ray flux enhancement in a post burst episode, which shows evidence of cooling. We discuss here the implications of these results on the nature of this unusual high-field radio pulsar, which firmly place it within the typical magnetar population.
  • Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has triggered and located on average approximately two gamma-ray bursts (GRB) every three days. Here we present the third of a series of catalogs of GRBs detected by GBM, extending the second catalog by two more years, through the middle of July 2014. The resulting list includes 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50-300~keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed, and also for a broader energy band from 10-1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBM's low-energy NaI(Tl) detectors. Using statistical methods to assess clustering, we find that the hardness and duration of GRBs are better fitted by a two-component model with short-hard and long-soft bursts, than by a model with three components. Furthermore, information is provided on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years five and six in the mission. This third catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).
  • We aim to obtain high-quality time-resolved spectral fits of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We perform time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in its first 4 years of mission. We present the complete catalog containing 1,491 spectra from 81 bursts with high spectral and temporal resolution. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained and presented as main results in this catalog. We report a criterion that is robust enough to automatically distinguish between different spectral evolutionary trends between bursts. We also search for plausible blackbody emission components and find that only 3 bursts (36 spectra in total) show evidence of a pure Planck function. It is observed that the averaged time-resolved low-energy power-law index and peak energy are slightly harder than the time-integrated values. Time-resolved spectroscopic results should be used when interpreting physics from the observed spectra, instead of the time-integrated results.
  • Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the data. Based on these results, we propose that the source electron distributions of TGFs observed by GBM vary on time scales of at least tens of microseconds, with an upper limit of approx. 100 microseconds.
  • We study the time-resolved spectra of eight GRBs observed by Fermi GBM in its first five years of mission, with 1 keV - 1 MeV fluence $f>1.0\times10^{-4}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ and signal-to-noise level $\text{S/N}\geq10.0$ above 900 keV. We aim to constrain in detail the spectral properties of GRB prompt emission on a time-resolved basis and to discuss the theoretical implications of the fitting results in the context of various prompt emission models. We perform time-resolved spectral analysis using a variable temporal binning technique according to optimal S/N criteria, resulting in a total of 299 time-resolved spectra. We fit the Band function to all spectra and obtain the distributions for the low-energy power-law index $\alpha$, the high-energy power-law index $\beta$, the peak energy in the observed $\nu F_\nu$ spectrum $E_\text{p}$, and the difference between the low- and high-energy power-law indices $\Delta s=\alpha-\beta$. Using the distributions of $\Delta s$ and $\beta$, the electron population index $p$ is found to be consistent with the "moderately fast" scenario which fast- and slow-cooling scenarios cannot be distinguished. We also apply a physically motivated synchrotron model, which is a triple power-law with constrained power-law indices and a blackbody component, to test for consistency with a synchrotron origin for the prompt emission and obtain the distributions for the two break energies $E_\text{b,1}$ and $E_\text{b,2}$, the middle segment power-law index $\beta$, and the Planck function temperature $kT$. A synchrotron model is found consistent with the majority of time-resolved spectra for these eight energetic Fermi GBM bursts with good high-energy photon statistics, as long as both the cooling and injection break are included and the leftmost spectral slope is lifted either by inclusion of a thermal component or when an evolving magnetic field is accounted for.