• Comet C/2017 K2 (PANSTARRS) was discovered by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Survey on 2017 May 21 at a distance 16.09 au from the Sun, the second most distant discovery of an active comet. Pre-discovery images in the PS1 archive back to 2014 and additional deep CFHT images between 2013 May 10-13 showed the comet to be active at 23.75 au. We derive an upper limit to the nucleus radius of $R_N$=80 km, assuming a 4\% albedo. The spectral reflectivity of the comet surface is similar to "fresh" regions seen on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using the $Rosetta$ OSIRIS camera. Pre-discovery photometry combined with new data obtained with Megacam on the CFHT show that the activity is consistent with CO-ice sublimation and inconsistent with CO$_2$-ice sublimation. The ice sublimation models were run out to perihelion in 2022 at 1.8 au to predict the CO production rates, assuming that the outgassing area does not change. Assuming a canonical 4\% active surface area for water-ice sublimation, we present production rate ratios, $Q_{\rm CO}$/$Q_{\rm H2O}$, for a range of nucleus sizes. Comparing these results with other CO-rich comets we derive a lower limit to the nucleus radius of $\sim$14 km. We present predictions for $Q_{\rm CO}$ at a range of distances that will be useful for planning observations with JWST and large ground-based facilities.
  • As the ESA Rosetta mission approached, orbited, and sent a lander to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014, a large campaign of ground-based observations also followed the comet. We constrain the total activity level of the comet by photometry and spectroscopy to place Rosetta results in context and to understand the large-scale structure of the comet's coma pre-perihelion. We performed observations using a number of telescopes, but concentrate on results from the 8m VLT and Gemini South telescopes in Chile. We use R-band imaging to measure the dust coma contribution to the comet's brightness and UV-visible spectroscopy to search for gas emissions, primarily using VLT/FORS. In addition we imaged the comet in near-infrared wavelengths (JHK) in late 2014 with Gemini-S/Flamingos 2. We find that the comet was already active in early 2014 at heliocentric distances beyond 4 au. The evolution of the total activity (measured by dust) followed previous predictions. No gas emissions were detected despite sensitive searches. The comet maintains a similar level of activity from orbit to orbit, and is in that sense predictable, meaning that Rosetta results correspond to typical behaviour for this comet. The gas production (for CN at least) is highly asymmetric with respect to perihelion, as our upper limits are below the measured production rates for similar distances post-perihelion in previous orbits.
  • We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24+/-10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28+/-10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of H_R=17.1+/-0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of r_e~1.00+/-0.15 km. The object's faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P's orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of T_l=12000 yr and being located near two 3-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ~155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.
  • (3200) Phaethon exhibits both comet- and asteroid-like properties, suggesting it could be a rare transitional object such as a dormant comet or previously volatile-rich asteroid. This justifies detailed study of (3200) Phaethon's physical properties, as a better understanding of asteroid-comet transition objects can provide insight into minor body evolution. We therefore acquired time-series photometry of (3200) Phaethon over 15 nights from 1994 to 2013, primarily using the Tektronix 2048x2048 pixel CCD on the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. We utilized light curve inversion to: (1) refine (3200) Phaethon's rotational period to P=3.6032+/-0.0008 h; (2) estimate a rotational pole orientation of lambda=+85+/-13 degrees and beta=-20+/-10 degrees; and (3) derive a shape model. We also used our extensive light curve dataset to estimate the slope parameter of (3200) Phaethon's phase curve as G~0.06, consistent with C-type asteroids. We discuss how this highly oblique pole orientation with a negative ecliptic latitude supports previous evidence for (3200) Phaethon's origin in the inner main asteroid belt as well as the potential for deeply buried volatiles fueling impulsive yet rare cometary outbursts.
  • We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained during the time period immediately after discovery (r=6.28 AU) until it moved into solar conjunction in mid-2013 June using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, the VYSOS-5 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawaii and data from the CARA network. Additional pre-discovery data from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 2011 September 30 (r=9.4 AU). The images showed a similar tail morphology due to small micron sized particles throughout 2013. Observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 2013 March 9 (r=4.52 AU) and June 16 (r=3.35 AU) were used to search for CO and HCN rotation lines. No gas was detected, with upper limits for CO ranging between (3.5-4.5)E27 molec/s. Combined with published water production rate estimates we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO2. At these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. We also infer that there was a long slow outburst of activity beginning in late 2011 peaking in mid-2013 January (r~5 AU) at which point the activity decreased again through 2013 June. We suggest that this outburst was driven by CO injecting large water ice grains into the coma. Observations as the comet came out of solar conjunction seem to confirm our models.
  • Previous studies determining which astronomical photometry software is best suited for a particular dataset are usually focused on speed, source classification, and/or meeting a sensitivity requirement. For faint objects in particular, the priority is given to maximizing signal-to-noise. Photometry of moving targets offers additional challenges (i) to aperture photometry because background object contamination varies from image to image, and (ii) to routines that build a PSF model from point sources in the image because trailed field stars do not perfectly represent the PSF of the untrailed target. Here, we present the results of testing several photometry algorithms (tphot, DAOPHOT, DoPHOT, APT, and multiple techniques within Source Extractor and IRAF's PHOT) on data for a faint, slow-moving solar system object with a known light curve. We find that the newly-developed tphot software most accurately and precisely reproduces the object's true light curve, with particular advantages in centroiding, exclusion of contaminants from the target's flux, and fitting flux in the wings of the point-spread function.
  • We present the discovery and spectroscopic follow-up of a nearby late-type L dwarf (2M0614+3950), and two extremely wide very-low-mass binary systems (2M0525-7425AB and 2M1348-1344AB), resulting from our search for common proper motion pairs containing ultracool components in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogs. The near-infrared spectrum of 2M0614+3950 indicates a spectral type L$9 \pm 1$ object residing at a distance of $26.0 \pm 1.8$ pc. The optical spectrum of 2M0525-7425A reveals an M$3.0 \pm 0.5$ dwarf primary, accompanied by a secondary previously classified as L2. The system has an angular separation of $\sim 44"$, equivalent to $\sim 2000 $AU at distance of $46.0 \pm 3.0$ pc. Using optical and infrared spectra, respectively, we classify the components of 2M1348-1344AB as M$4.5 \pm 0.5$ and T$5.5 \pm 1$. The angular separation of $\sim 68"$ is equivalent to $\sim 1400 $AU at a distance of $20.7 \pm 1.4$ pc. 2M1348-1344AB is one of only six very wide (separation $>$ 1000 AU) systems containing late T dwarfs known to date.
  • We describe the recovery of faint Main Belt comet P/2008 R1 Garradd using several telescopes, culminating in a successful low $S/N$ recovery with the Gemini North telescope with GMOS. This recovery was a time-critical effort for a mission proposal, and had to be performed in a crowded field. We describe techniques and software tools for eliminating systematic noise artifacts and stellar residuals, bringing the final detection image statistics close to the Gaussian ideal for a median image stack, and achieving a detection sensitivity close to this theoretical optimum. The magnitude of $R_c$=26.1$\pm$0.2 with an assumed geometric albedo of 0.05 corresponds to a radius of 0.3 km. For ice to have survived in this object over the age of the solar system, it implies that the object is a more recent collisional fragment. We discuss the implications of the unexpectedly faint magnitude and nuclear size of P/2008 R1 on the survival of ice inside very small bodies.
  • P/2010 A2 is an object on an asteroidal orbit that was observed to have an extended tail or debris trail in January 2010. In this work, we fit the outburst of P/2010 A2 with a conical burst model, and verify previous suspicions that this was a one--time collisional event rather than an sustained cometary outburst, implying that P/2010 A2 is not a new Main Belt Comet driven by ice sublimation. We find that the best--fit cone opening angle is about 40 to 50 degrees, in agreement with numerical and laboratory simulations of cratering events. Mapping debris orbits to sky positions suggests that the distinctive arc features in the debris correspond to the same debris cone inferred from the extended dust. From the velocity of the debris, and from the presence of a velocity maximum at around 15 cm/s, we infer that the surface of A2 probably has a very low strength (<1 kPa), comparable to lunar regolith.
  • From a dynamical analysis of the orbital elements of transneptunian objects (TNOs), Ragozzine & Brown reported a list of candidate members of the first collisional family found among this population, associated with (136108) Haumea (a.k.a. 2003 EL61). We aim to distinguish the true members of the Haumea collisional family from interlopers. We search for water ice on their surfaces, which is a common characteristic of the known family members. The properties of the confirmed family are used to constrain the formation mechanism of Haumea, its satellites, and its family. Optical and near-infrared photometry is used to identify water ice. We use in particular the CH4 filter of the Hawk-I instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope as a short H-band (Hs), the (J-Hs) colour being a sensitive measure of the water ice absorption band at 1.6 {\mu}m. Continuing our previous study headed by Snodgrass, we report colours for 8 candidate family members, including near-infrared colours for 5. We confirm one object as a genuine member of the collisional family (2003 UZ117), and reject 5 others. The lack of infrared data for the two remaining objects prevent any conclusion from being drawn. The total number of rejected members is therefore 17. The 11 confirmed members represent only a third of the 36 candidates. The origin of Haumea's family is likely to be related to an impact event. However, a scenario explaining all the peculiarities of Haumea itself and its family remains elusive.
  • 103P/Hartley 2 was selected as the target comet for the Deep Impact extended mission, EPOXI, in October 2007. There have been no direct optical observations of the nucleus of this comet, as it has always been highly active when previously observed. We aimed to recover the comet near to aphelion, to a) confirm that it had not broken up and was in the predicted position, b) to provide astrometry and brightness information for mission planning, and c) to continue the characterisation of the nucleus. We observed the comet at heliocentric distances between 5.7 and 5.5 AU, using FORS2 at the VLT, at 4 epochs between May and July 2008. We performed VRI photometry on deep stacked images to look for activity and measure the absolute magnitude and therefore estimate the size of the nucleus. We recovered the comet near the expected position, with a magnitude of m_R = 23.74 \pm 0.06 at the first epoch. The comet had no visible coma, although comparison of the profile with a stellar one showed that there was faint activity, or possibly a contribution to the flux from the dust trail from previous activity. This activity appears to fade at further epochs, implying that this is a continuation of activity past aphelion from the previous apparition rather than an early start to activity before the next perihelion. Our data imply a nucleus radius of \le 1 km for an assumed 4% albedo; we estimate a ~6% albedo. We measure a colour of (V-R) = 0. 26 \pm 0.09.
  • The collision of Deep Impact with comet 9P/Tempel 1 generated a bright cloud of dust which dissipated during several days after the impact. The brightness variations of this cloud and the changes of its position and shape are governed by the physical properties of the dust grains. We use a Monte Carlo model to describe the evolution of the post-impact dust plume. The results of our dynamical simulations are compared to the data obtained with FORS2, the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph for the VLT of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), to derive the particle size distribution and the total amount of material contained in the dust ejecta cloud.
  • We present and discuss the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of the peculiar SN1998bw, associated with GRB980425, through an analysis of optical and near IR data collected at ESO-La Silla. The spectroscopic data, spanning the period from day -9 to day +376 (relative to B maximum), have shown that this SN was unprecedented, although somewhat similar to SN1997ef. Maximum expansion velocities as high as 3x10^4 km/s to some extent mask its resemblance to other Type Ic SNe. At intermediate phases, between photospheric and fully nebular, the expansion velocities (~10^4 km/s) remained exceptionally high compared to those of other recorded core-collapse SNe at a similar phase. The mild linear polarization detected at early epochs suggests the presence of asymmetry in the emitting material. The degree of asymmetry, however, cannot be decoded from these measurements alone. The HeI 1.083 mu and 2.058 mu lines are identified and He is suggested to lie in an outer region of the envelope. The temporal behavior of the fluxes and profiles of emission lines of MgI]4571A, [OI]6300,6364A and a feature ascribed to Fe are traced to stimulate future modeling work.