• We analyze two pre-supernova (SN) and three post-SN high-resolution images of the site of the Type II-Plateau supernova SN 2006my in an effort to either detect the progenitor star or to constrain its properties. Following image registration, we find that an isolated stellar object is not detected at the location of SN 2006my in either of the two pre-SN images. In the first, an I-band image obtained with the Wide-Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope, the offset between the SN 2006my location and a detected source ("Source 1") is too large: > 0.08", which corresponds to a confidence level of non-association of 96% from our most liberal estimates of the transformation and measurement uncertainties. In the second, a similarly obtained V-band image, a source is detected ("Source 2") that has overlap with the SN 2006my location but is definitively an extended object. Through artificial star tests carried out on the precise location of SN 2006my in the images, we derive a 3-sigma upper bound on the luminosity of a red supergiant that could have remained undetected in our pre-SN images of log L/L_Sun = 5.10, which translates to an upper bound on such a star's initial mass of 15 M_Sun from the STARS stellar evolutionary models. Although considered unlikely, we can not rule out the possibility that part of the light comprising Source 1, which exhibits a slight extension relative to other point sources in the image, or part of the light contributing to the extended Source 2, may be due to the progenitor of SN 2006my. Only additional, high-resolution observations of the site taken after SN 2006my has faded beyond detection can confirm or reject these possibilities.
  • We investigate the limits of ground-based astrometry with adaptive optics using the core of the Galactic globular cluster M5. Adaptive optics systems provide near diffraction-limit imaging with the world's largest telescopes. The substantial improvement in both resolution and signal-to-noise ratio enables high-precision astrometry from the ground. We describe the dominant systematic errors that typically limit ground-based differential astrometry, and enumerate observational considerations for mitigating their effects. After implementing these measures, we find that the dominant limitation on astrometric performance in this experiment is caused by tilt anisoplanatism. We then present an optimal estimation technique for measuring the position of one star relative to a grid of reference stars in the face of this correlated random noise source. Our methodology has the advantage of reducing the astrometric errors as the square root of time and faster than the square root of the number of reference stars -- effectively eliminating noise caused by atmospheric tilt to the point that astrometric performance is limited by centering accuracy. Using 50 reference stars we demonstrate single-epoch astrometric precision of ~ 1 mas in 1 second, decreasing to < 100 microarcseconds in 2 minutes of integration time at the Hale 200-inch telescope. We also show that our astrometry is accurate to <~ 100 microarcseconds for observations separated by 2 months. Finally, we discuss the limits and potential of differential astrometry with current and next generation large aperture telescopes. At this level of accuracy, numerous astrometric applications become accessible, including planet detection, astrometric microlensing signatures, and kinematics of distant Galactic stellar populations.
  • The gamma-ray burst (GRB) 070201 was a bright short-duration hard-spectrum GRB detected by the Inter-Planetary Network (IPN). Its error quadrilateral, which has an area of 0.124 sq. deg, intersects some prominent spiral arms of the nearby M31 (Andromeda) galaxy. Given the properties of this GRB, along with the fact that LIGO data argues against a compact binary merger origin in M31, this GRB is an excellent candidate for an extragalactic Soft Gamma-ray Repeater (SGR) giant flare, with energy of 1.4x10^45 erg. Analysis of ROTSE-IIIb visible light observations of M31, taken 10.6 hours after the burst and covering 42% of the GRB error region, did not reveal any optical transient down to a limiting magnitude of 17.1. We inspected archival and proprietary XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the intersection of the GRB error quadrilateral and M31, obtained about four weeks prior to the outburst, in order to look for periodic variable X-ray sources. No SGR or Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) candidates (periods in range 1 to 20 s) were detected. We discuss the possibility of detecting extragalactic SGRs/AXPs by identifying their periodic X-ray light curves. Our simulations suggest that the probability of detecting the periodic X-ray signal of one of the known Galactic SGRs/AXPs, if placed in M31, is about 10% (50%), using 50 ks (2 Ms) XMM-Newton exposures.
  • We present the discovery and high signal-to-noise spectroscopic observations of the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB070125. Unlike all previously observed long-duration afterglows in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2.0, we find no strong (rest-frame equivalent width W > 1.0 A) absorption features in the wavelength range 4000 - 10000 A. The sole significant feature is a weak doublet we identify as Mg II 2796 (W = 0.18 +/- 0.02 A), 2803 (W = 0.08 +/- 0.01) at z = 1.5477 +/- 0.0001. The low observed Mg II and inferred H I column densities are typically observed in galactic halos, far away from the bulk of massive star formation. Deep ground-based imaging reveals no host directly underneath the afterglow to a limit of R > 25.4 mag. Either of the two nearest blue galaxies could host GRB070125; the large offset (d >= 27 kpc) would naturally explain the low column density. To remain consistent with the large local (i.e. parsec scale) circum-burst density inferred from broadband afterglow observations, we speculate GRB070125 may have occurred far away from the disk of its host in a compact star-forming cluster. Such distant stellar clusters, typically formed by dynamical galaxy interactions, have been observed in the nearby universe, and should be more prevalent at z>1 where galaxy mergers occur more frequently.
  • GRB 070610 is a typical high-energy event with a duration of 5s.Yet within the burst localization we detect a highly unusual X-ray and optical transient, SwiftJ195509.6+261406. We see high amplitude X-ray and optical variability on very short time scales even at late times. Using near-infrared imaging assisted by a laser guide star and adaptive optics, we identified the counterpart of SwiftJ195509.6+261406. Late-time optical and near-infrared imaging constrain the spectral type of the counterpart to be fainter than a K-dwarf assuming it is of Galactic origin. It is possible that GRB 070610 and Swift J195509.6+261406 are unrelated sources. However, the absence of a typical X-ray afterglow from GRB 070610 in conjunction with the spatial and temporal coincidence of the two motivate us to suggest that the sources are related. The closest (imperfect) analog to Swift J195509.6+261406 is V4641 Sgr, an unusual black hole binary. We suggest that Swift J195509.6+261406 along with V4641 Sgr define a sub-class of stellar black hole binaries -- the fast X-ray novae. We further suggest that fast X-ray novae are associated with bursts of gamma-rays. If so, GRB 070610 defines a new class of celestial gamma-ray bursts and these bursts dominate the long-duration GRB demographics
  • We present detailed optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the X-ray flash 050416a obtained with Palomar and Siding Springs Observatories as well as HST and the VLA, placing this event among the best-studied X-ray flashes to date. In addition, we present an optical spectrum from Keck LRIS from which we measure the redshift of the burst, z=0.6528. At this redshift the isotropic-equivalent prompt energy release was about 10^51 erg, and using a standard afterglow synchrotron model we find that the blastwave kinetic energy is a factor of 10 larger, E_K,iso ~ 10^52 erg. The lack of an observed jet break to t ~ 20 days indicates that the opening angle is larger than 7 deg and the total beaming-corrected relativistic energy is larger than 10^50 erg. We further show that the burst produced a strong radio flare at t ~ 40 days accompanied by an observed flattening in the X-ray band which we attribute to an abrupt circumburst density jump or an episode of energy injection (either from a refreshed shock or off-axis ejecta). Late-time observations with HST show evidence for an associated supernova with peak optical luminosity roughly comparable to that of SN 1998bw. Next, we show that the host galaxy of XRF 050416a is actively forming stars at a rate of at least 2 M_solar per year with a luminosity of L_B ~ 0.5L* and metallicity of Z ~ 0.2-0.8 Z_solar. Finally, we discuss the nature of XRF 050416a in the context of short-hard gamma-ray bursts and under the framework of off-axis and dirty fireball models for X-ray flashes.
  • We present high resolution imaging of the puzzling radio and optical nebula G70.7+1.2 with the Keck Observatory's laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) system and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The archival X-ray observations show a hard (Gamma ~ 1.8), low luminosity (L_X ~ 4 x 10^31 ergs/s) point source at the center of the nebula. Follow-up LGS-AO near-infrared imaging of the Chandra error circle reveals a relatively bright (K' ~ 14 magnitude) counterpart. Both its color and brightness are consistent with a heavily obscured B-star or possibly a late-G/early-K giant. The most plausible explanation is that this newly discovered X-ray source is a non-accreting B-star/pulsar binary powering the radio and optical nebula. If so, the luminous Be-star discussed in the literature seemingly embedded in the nebula is not the dominant force responsible for shaping G70.7+1.2. Thus, we suggest that G70.7+1.2 is the result of two unrelated objects (a B-star X-ray binary and a Be star) interacting with a dense molecular cloud. With this explanation we believe we have solved the mystery of the origin of G70.7+1.2.
  • With an extinction-corrected V-band peak absolute magnitude of about -22, supernova (SN) 2006gy is probably the brightest SN ever observed. We report on multi-wavelength observations of this SN and its environment. Our spectroscopy shows an H alpha emission line as well as absorption features which may be identified as SiII lines at low expansion velocity. The high peak luminosity, the slow rise to maximum, and the narrow H alpha line are similar to those observed in hybrid type-Ia/IIn (also called IIa) SNe. The host galaxy, NGC 1260, is dominated by an old stellar population with solar metallicity. However, our high resolution adaptive optics images reveal a dust lane in this galaxy, and there appears to be an HII region in the vicinity of the SN. The extra-ordinarily large peak luminosity, ~3x10^44 erg/s, demands a dense circum-stellar medium, regardless of the mass of the progenitor star. The inferred mass loss rate of the progenitor is ~0.1 solar mass per year over a period of ~10 yr prior to explosion. Such an high mass-loss rate may be the result of a binary star common envelope ejection. The total radiated energy in the first two months is about 1.1x10^51 erg, which is only a factor of two less than that available from a super-Chandrasekhar Ia explosion. Therefore, given the presence of a star forming region in the vicinity of the SN and the high energy requirements, a plausible scenario is that SN 2006gy is related to the death of a massive star (e.g., pair production SN).
  • Using archival X-ray data, we find that the catalog location of the X-ray binary Scutum X-1 (Sct X-1) is incorrect, and that the correct location is that of the X-ray source AX J183528-0737, which is 15' to the west. Our identification is made on the basis of the 112-s pulse period for this object detected in an XMM-Newton observation, as well as spatial coincidence between AX J183528-0737 and previous X-ray observations. Based on the XMM-Newton data and archival RXTE data, we confirm secular spin-down over 17 years with period derivative Pdot~3.9e-9 s/s, but do not detect a previously reported X-ray iron fluorescence line. We identify a bright (Ks=6.55), red (J-Ks=5.51), optical and infrared counterpart to AX J183528-0737 from 2MASS, a number of mid-IR surveys, and deep optical observations, which we use to constrain the extinction to and distance of Sct X-1. From these data, as well as limited near-IR spectroscopy, we conclude that Sct X-1 is most likely a binary system comprised of a late-type giant or supergiant and a neutron star.
  • We present results from our 830 ksec observation of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae with the Chandra X-ray Observatory's High Resolution Camera-S. We limit our analysis here to the 19 previously known, localized millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the cluster. This work more than doubles the sample of X-ray-detected MSPs observed with sensitivity to rotational variability; it is also the first survey of a large group of radio-discovered MSPs for which no previous X-ray pulsations have been detected and is therefore an unbiased survey of the X-ray properties of radio-discovered MSPs. We find that only 47 Tuc D, O and R show significant pulsations at the >~ 4-sigma level, but there is statistical evidence for rotational variability in five additional MSPs. Furthermore, we constrain the pulsed magnetospheric emission of 7 more MSPs using Monte Carlo simulations. The result is that the majority of the 47 Tuc MSPs are characterized by low pulsed fractions, <~ 50%. In cases where larger pulsed fractions are measured the folded pulse profiles show relatively large duty cycles. When considered with previous spectroscopic studies, this suggests that the X-ray emission arises from the neutron star's heated polar caps, and in some cases, from intra-binary shocks, but generally not directly from the star's magnetosphere. We discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of high energy emission from MSPs.
  • The bright short-hard GRB 051103 was triangulated by the inter-planetary network and found to occur in the direction of the nearby M81/M82 galaxy group. Given its possible local-Universe nature, we searched for an afterglow associated with this burst. We observed the entire 3-sigma error quadrilateral using the Palomar 60-inch robotic telescope and the Very Large Array (VLA) about three days after the burst. We used the optical and radio observations to constrain the flux of any afterglow related to this burst, and to show that this burst is not associated with a typical supernova out to z~0.15. Our optical and radio observations, along with the Konus/Wind gamma-ray energy and light curve are consistent with this burst being a giant flare of a Soft Gamma-ray Repeater (SGR) within the M81 galaxy group. Furthermore, we find a star forming region associated with M81 within the error quadrilateral of this burst which supports the SGR hypothesis. If confirmed, this will be the first case of a soft gamma-ray repeater outside the local group.
  • Over the last decade, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) including the subclass of X-ray flashes (XRFs) have been revealed to be a rare variety of Type Ibc supernova (SN). While all these events result from the death of massive stars, the electromagnetic luminosities of GRBs and XRFs exceed those of ordinary Type Ibc SNe by many orders of magnitude. The essential physical process that causes a dying star to produce a GRB or XRF, and not just an SN, remains the crucial open question. Here we present radio and X-ray observations of XRF 060218 (associated with SN 2006aj), the second nearest GRB identified to-date, which allow us to measure its total energy and place it in the larger context of cosmic explosions. We show that this event is 100 times less energetic but ten times more common than cosmological GRBs. Moreover, it is distinguished from ordinary Type Ibc SNe by the presence of 10^48 erg coupled to mildly-relativistic ejecta, along with a central engine (an accretion-fed, rapidly rotating compact source) which produces X-rays for weeks after the explosion. This suggests that the production of relativistic ejecta is the key physical distinction between GRBs/XRFs and ordinary SNe, while the nature of the central engine (black hole or magnetar) may distinguish typical bursts from low-luminosity, spherical events like XRF 060218.
  • We present observations of the unusually bright and long gamma-ray burst GRB 050820A, one of the best-sampled broadband data sets in the Swift era. The gamma-ray light curve is marked by a soft precursor pulse some 200 s before the main event; the lack of any intervening emission suggests that it is due to a physical mechanism distinct from the GRB itself. The large time lag between the precursor and the main emission enabled simultaneous observations in the gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical band-passes, something only achieved for a handful of events to date. While the contemporaneous X-rays are the low-energy tail of the prompt emission, the optical does not directly track the gamma-ray flux. Instead, the early-time optical data appear mostly consistent with the forward shock synchrotron peak passing through the optical, and are therefore likely the beginning of the afterglow. On hour time scales after the burst, the X-ray and optical light curves are inconsistent with an adiabatic expansion of the shock into the surrounding region, but rather indicate that there is a period of energy injection. Observations at late times allow us to constrain the collimation angle of the relativistic outflow to theta = 6.8 - 9.3 degrees. Our estimates of both the kinetic energy of the afterglow and the prompt gamma-ray energy release make GRB 050820A one of the most energetic events for which such values could be determined.
  • We report the direct measurement of orbital period decay in the double neutron star pulsar system PSR B2127+11C in the globular cluster M15 at the rate of $(-3.95 \pm 0.13) \times 10^{-12}$, consistent with the prediction of general relativity at the $\sim 3 %$ level. We find the pulsar mass to be $m_p = (1.358 \pm 0.010) M_\odot$ and the companion mass $m_c = (1.354 \pm 0.010) M_\odot$. We also report long-term pulse timing results for the pulsars PSR B2127+11A and PSR B2127+11B, including confirmation of the cluster proper motion.
  • We present the discovery of radio afterglow emission from the high redshift (z=6.295) burst GRB 050904. The peak flux density for this burst is similar to typical low-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRB). We further show that beyond a redshift of order unity, the flux density of radio afterglows are largely insensitive to redshift, consistent with predictions. By combining the existing X-ray, near-infrared and radio measurements, we derive estimates for the kinetic energy and opening angle of the blast wave, and for the density of the circumburst medium into which it expands. Both the kinetic and radiated energy indicate that GRB 050904 was an unusally energetic burst (10**52 erg). More importantly, we are able to make an in situ measurement of the density structure of the circumburst medium. We conclude that GRB 050904 exploded into a constant density medium with n=680 cm**-3, which is two orders of magnitude above the nominal value for low-redshift GRBs. The next generation of centimeter (EVLA) and millimeter radio instuments (ALMA) will be able to routinely detect events like GRB 050904 and use them to study magnetic fields, and the atomic and molecular gas in the high redshift Universe.
  • The final chapter in the long-standing mystery of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) centres on the origin of the short-hard class, suspected on theoretical grounds to result from the coalescence of neutron star or black hole binary systems. Numerous searches for the afterglows of short-hard bursts have been made, galvanized by the revolution in our understanding of long-duration GRBs that followed the discovery in 1997 of their broadband (X-ray, optical, and radio) afterglow emission. Here we present the discovery of the X-ray afterglow of a short-hard burst whose accurate position allows us to unambiguously associate it with a star-forming galaxy at redshift z=0.160, and whose optical lightcurve definitively excludes a supernova association. Together with results from three other recent short-hard bursts, this suggests that short-hard bursts release much less energy than the long-duration GRBs. Models requiring young stellar populations, such as magnetars and collapsars, are ruled out, while coalescing degenerate binaries remain the most promising progenitor candidates.
  • Over a decade ago it was established that the remarkable high energy transients, known as soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), are a Galactic population and originate from neutron stars with intense (<~ 10^15 G) magnetic fields ("magnetars"). On 27 December 2004 a giant flare (fluence >~ 0.3 erg/cm^2) was detected from SGR 1806-20. Here we report the discovery of a fading radio counterpart. We began a monitoring program from 0.2GHz to 250GHz and obtained a high resolution 21-cm radio spectrum which traces the intervening interstellar neutral Hydrogen clouds. Analysis of the spectrum yields the first direct distance measurement of SGR 1806-20. The source is located at a distance greater than 6.4 kpc and we argue that it is nearer than 9.8 kpc. If true, our distance estimate lowers the total energy of the explosion and relaxes the demands on theoretical models. The energetics and the rapid decay of the radio source are not compatible with the afterglow model that is usually invoked for gamma-ray bursts. Instead we suggest that the rapidly decaying radio emission arises from the debris ejected during the explosion.