• Metal to insulator transitions (MITs) driven by strong electronic correlations are common in condensed matter systems, and are associated with some of the most remarkable collective phenomena in solids, including superconductivity and magnetism. Tuning and control of the transition holds the promise of novel, low power, ultrafast electronics, but the relative roles of doping, chemistry, elastic strain and other applied fields has made systematic understanding difficult to obtain. Here we point out that existing data on tuning of the MIT in perovskite transition metal oxides through ionic size effects provides evidence of systematic and large effects on the phase transition due to dynamical fluctuations of the elastic strain, which have been usually neglected. This is illustrated by a simple yet quantitative statistical mechanical calculation in a model that incorporates cooperative lattice distortions coupled to the electronic degrees of freedom. We reproduce the observed dependence of the transition temperature on cation radius in the well-studied manganite and nickelate materials. Since the elastic couplings are generically quite strong, these conclusions will broadly generalize to all MITs that couple to a change in lattice symmetry.
  • The structural phase transitions of MF$_3$ (M=Al, Cr, V, Fe, Ti, Sc) metal trifluorides are studied within a simple Landau theory consisting of tilts of rigid MF$_6$ octahedra associated with soft antiferrodistoritive optic modes that are coupled to long-wavelength strain generating acoustic phonons. We calculate the temperature and pressure dependence of several quantities such as the spontaneous distortions, volume expansion and shear strains as well as $T-P$ phase diagrams. By contrasting our model to experiments we quantify the deviations from mean-field behavior and found that the tilt fluctuations of the MF$_6$ octahedra increase with metal cation size. We apply our model to predict giant barocaloric effects in Sc substituted TiF$_3$ of up to about $15\,$JK$^{-1}$kg$^{-1}$ for modest hydrostatic compressions of $0.2\,$GPa. The effect extends over a wide temperature range of over $140\,$K (including room temperature) due to a large predicted rate $dT_c/dP = 723\,$K GPa$^{-1}$, which exceeds those of typical barocaloric materials. Our results suggest that open lattice frameworks such as the trifluorides are an attractive platform to search for giant barocaloric effects.
  • Ferroelectrics are attractive candidate materials for environmentally friendly solid state refrigeration free of greenhouse gases. Their thermal response upon variations of external electric fields is largest in the vicinity of their phase transitions, which may occur near room temperature. The magnitude of the effect, however, is too small for useful cooling applications even when they are driven close to dielectric breakdown. Insight from microscopic theory is therefore needed to characterize materials and provide guiding principles to search for new ones with enhanced electrocaloric performance. Here, we derive from well-known microscopic models of ferroelectricity meaningful figures of merit which provide insight into the relation between the strength of the effect and the characteristic interactions of ferroelectrics such as dipole forces. We find that the long range nature of these interactions results in a small effect. A strategy is proposed to make it larger by shortening the correlation lengths of fluctuations of polarization.
  • We study the free energy landscape of a minimal model for relaxor ferroelectrics. Using a variational method which includes leading correlations beyond the mean-field approximation as well as disorder averaging at the level of a simple replica theory, we find metastable paraelectric states with a stability region that extends to zero temperature. The free energy of such states exhibits an essential singularity for weak compositional disorder pointing to their necessary occurrence. Ferroelectric states appear as local minima in the free energy at high temperatures and become stable below a coexistence temperature $T_c$. We calculate the phase diagram in the electric field-temperature plane and find a coexistence line of the polar and non-polar phases which ends at a critical point. First-order phase transitions are induced for fields sufficiently large to cross the region of stability of the metastable paraelectric phase. These polar and non-polar states have distinct structure factors from those of conventional ferroelectrics. We use this theoretical framework to compare and to gain physical understanding of various experimental results in typical relaxors.
  • Using a Ginzburg--Landau--Devonshire model that includes the coupling of polarization to strain, we calculate the fluctuation spectra of ferroelectric domain walls. The influence of the strain coupling differs between 180 degree and 90 degree walls due to the different strain profiles of the two configurations. The finite speed of acoustic phonons, $v_s$, retards the response of the strain to polarization fluctuations, and the results depend on $v_s$. For $v_s \to \infty$, the strain mediates an instantaneous electrostrictive interaction, which is long-range in the 90 degree wall case. For finite $v_s$, acoustic phonons damp the wall excitations, producing a continuum in the spectral function. As $v_s\ to 0$, a gapped mode emerges, which corresponds to the polarization oscillating in a fixed strain potential.
  • We calculate the photoluminescence spectrum and lifetime of a biexciton in a semiconductor using Fermi's golden rule. Our biexciton wavefunction is obtained using a Quantum Monte Carlo calculation. We consider a recombination process where one of the excitons within the biexciton annihilates. For hole masses greater than or equal to the electron mass, we find that the surviving exciton is most likely to populate the ground state. We also investigate how the confinement of excitons in a quantum dot would modify the lifetime in the limit of a large quantum dot where confinement principally affects the centre of mass wavefunction. The lifetimes we obtain are in reasonable agreement with experimental values. Our calculation can be used as a benchmark for comparison with approximate methods.
  • Atoms, molecules or excitonic quasiparticles, for which excitations are induced by external radiation fields and energy is dissipated through radiative decay, are examples of driven open quantum systems. We explain the use of commutator-free exponential time-propagators for the numerical solution of the associated Schr\"odinger or master equations with a time-dependent Hamilton operator. These time-propagators are based on the Magnus series but avoid the computation of commutators, which makes them suitable for the efficient propagation of systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. We present an optimized fourth order propagator and demonstrate its efficiency in comparison to the direct Runge-Kutta computation. As an illustrative example we consider the parametrically driven dissipative Dicke model, for which we calculate the periodic steady state and the optical emission spectrum.
  • We study zigzag interfaces between insulating compounds that are isostructural to graphene, specifically II-VI, III-V and IV-IV two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb insulators. We show that these one-dimensional interfaces are polar, with a net density of excess charge that can be simply determined by using the ideal (integer) formal valence charges, regardless of the predominant covalent character of the bonding in these materials. We justify this finding on fundamental physical grounds, by analyzing the topology of the formal polarization lattice in the parent bulk materials. First principles calculations elucidate an electronic compensation mechanism not dissimilar to oxide interfaces, which is triggered by a Zener-like charge transfer between interfaces of opposite polarity. In particular, we predict the emergence of one dimensional electron and hole gases (1DEG), which in some cases are ferromagnetic half-metallic.
  • We consider performing adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) using frequency-swept driving pulses to excite a collection of interacting two-level systems. Such a model arises in a wide range of many-body quantum systems, such as cavity QED or quantum dots, where a nonlinear component couples to light. We analyze the one-dimensional case using the Jordan-Wigner transformation, as well as the mean field limit where the system is described by a Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick Hamiltonian. These limits provide complementary insights into the behavior of many-body systems under ARP, suggesting our results are generally applicable. We demonstrate that ARP can be used for state preparation in the presence of interactions, and identify the dependence of the required pulse shapes on the interaction strength. In general interactions increase the pulse bandwidth required for successful state transfer, introducing new restrictions on the pulse forms required.
  • We present a theoretical study on the relation between the size of the rare earth ions, often known as chemical pressure, and the stability of the coherent Jahn-Teller distortions in undoped perovskite manganites. Using a Keating model expressed in terms of atomic scale symmetry modes, we show that there exists a coupling between the uniform shear distortion and the staggered buckling distortion within the Jahn-Teller energy term. It is found that this coupling provides a mechanism by which the coherent Jahn-Teller distortion is more stabilized by smaller rare earth ions. We analyze the appearance of the uniform shear distortion below the Jahn-Teller ordering temperature, estimate the Jahn-Teller ordering temperature and its variation between NdMnO3 and LaMnO3, and obtain the relations between distortions. We find good agreement between theoretical results and experimental data.
  • We present a new methodology to solve the Anderson impurity model, in the context of dynamical mean-field theory, based on the exact diagonalization method. We propose a strategy to effectively refine the exact diagonalization solver by combining a finite-temperature Lanczos algorithm with an adapted version of the cluster perturbation theory. We show that the augmented diagonalization yields an improved accuracy in the description of the spectral function of the single-band Hubbard model and is a reliable approach for a full d-orbital manifold calculation.
  • Solid state quantum condensates can differ from other condensates, such as Helium, ultracold atomic gases, and superconductors, in that the condensing quasiparticles have relatively short lifetimes, and so, as for lasers, external pumping is required to maintain a steady state. In this chapter we present a non-equilibrium path integral approach to condensation in a dissipative environment and apply it to microcavity polaritons, driven out of equilibrium by coupling to multiple baths, describing pumping and decay. Using this, we discuss the relation between non-equilibrium polariton condensation, lasing, and equilibrium condensation.
  • Quantum criticality is a central concept in condensed matter physics, but the direct observation of quantum critical fluctuations has remained elusive. Here we present an x-ray diffraction study of the charge density wave (CDW) in 2H-NbSe2 at high pressure and low temperature, where we observe a broad regime of order parameter fluctuations that are controlled by proximity to a quantum critical point. X-rays can track the CDW despite the fact that the quantum critical regime is shrouded inside a superconducting phase, and, in contrast to transport probes, allow direct measurement of the critical fluctuations of the charge order. Concurrent measurements of the crystal lattice point to a critical transition that is continuous in nature. Our results confirm the longstanding expectations of enhanced quantum fluctuations in low dimensional systems, and may help to constrain theories of the quantum critical Fermi surface.
  • Against expectations, robust switchable ferroelectricity has been recently observed in ultrathin (1 nm) ferroelectric films exposed to air [V. Garcia $et$ $al.$, Nature {\bf 460}, 81 (2009)]. Based on first-principles calculations, we show that the system does not polarize unless charged defects or adsorbates form at the surface. We propose electrochemical processes as the most likely origin of this charge. The ferroelectric polarization of the film adapts to the bound charge generated on its surface by redox processes when poling the film. This, in turn, alters the band alignment at the bottom electrode interface, explaining the observed tunneling electroresistance. Our conclusions are supported by energetics calculated for varied electrochemical scenarios.
  • The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface between LaAlO$_3$ (LAO) and SrTiO$_3$ (STO) has become one of the most fascinating and highly-debated oxide systems of recent times. Here we propose that a one-dimensional electron gas (1DEG) can be engineered at the step edges of the LAO/STO interface. These predictions are supported by first principles calculations and electrostatic modeling which elucidate the origin of the 1DEG as an electronic reconstruction to compensate a net surface charge in the step edge. The results suggest a novel route to increasing the functional density in these electronic interfaces.
  • We construct numerical basis function sets on a lattice, whose spatial extension is scalable from single lattice sites to the continuum limit. They allow us to compute small and large bound states with comparable, moderate effort. Adopting concepts of discrete variable representations, a diagonal form of the potential term is achieved through a unitary transformation to Gaussian quadrature points. Thereby the computational effort in three dimensions scales as the fourth instead of the sixth power of the number of basis functions along each axis, such that it is reduced by two orders of magnitude in realistic examples. As an improvement over standard discrete variable representations, our construction preserves the variational principle. It allows for the calculation of binding energies, wave functions, and excitation spectra. We use this technique to study central-cell corrections for excitons beyond the continuum approximation. A discussion of the mass and spectrum of the yellow exciton series in the cuprous oxide, which does not follow the hydrogenic Rydberg series of Mott-Wannier excitons, is given on the basis of a simple lattice model.
  • We study the stability of collective amplitude excitations in non-equilibrium polariton condensates. These excitations correspond to renormalized upper polaritons and to the collective amplitude modes of atomic gases and superconductors. They would be present following a quantum quench or could be created directly by resonant excitation. We show that uniform amplitude excitations are unstable to the production of excitations at finite wavevectors, leading to the formation of density-modulated phases. The physical processes causing the instabilities can be understood by analogy to optical parametric oscillators and the atomic Bose supernova.
  • The polar interface between LaAlO$_{3}$ and SrTiO$_{3}$ has shown promise as a field effect transistor, with reduced (nanoscale) feature sizes and potentially added functionality over conventional semiconductor systems. However, the mobility of the interfacial two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is lower than desirable. Therefore to progress, the highly debated origin of the 2DEG must be understood. Here we present a case for surface redox reactions as the origin of the 2DEG, in particular surface O vacancies, using a model supported by first principles calculations that describes the redox formation. In agreement with recent spectroscopic and transport measurements, we predict a stabilization of such redox processes (and hence Ti 3$d$ occupation) with film thickness beyond a critical value, which can be smaller than the critical thickness for 2D electronic conduction, since the surface defects generate trapping potentials that will affect the interface electron mobility. Several other recent experimental results, such as lack of core level broadening and shifts, find natural explanation. Pristine systems will likely require changed growth conditions or modified materials with a higher vacancy free energy.
  • The issue of the net charge at insulating oxide interfaces is shortly reviewed with the ambition of dispelling myths of such charges being affected by covalency and related charge density effects. For electrostatic analysis purposes, the net charge at such interfaces is defined by the counting of discrete electrons and core ion charges, and by the definition of the reference polarisation of the separate, unperturbed bulk materials. The arguments are illustrated for the case of a thin film of LaAlO$_3$ over SrTiO$_3$ in the absence of free carriers, for which the net charge is exactly 0.5$e$ per interface formula unit, if the polarisation response in both materials is referred to zero bulk values. Further consequences of the argument are extracted for structural and chemical alterations of such interfaces, in which internal rearrangements are distinguished from extrinsic alterations (changes of stoichiometry, redox processes), only the latter affecting the interfacial net charge. The arguments are reviewed alongside the proposal of Stengel and Vanderbilt [Phys. Rev. B {\bf 80}, 241103 (2009)] of using formal polarisation values instead of net interfacial charges, based on the interface theorem of Vanderbilt and King-Smith [Phys. Rev. B {\bf 48}, 4442 (1993)]. Implications for non-centrosymmetric materials are discussed, as well as for interfaces for which the charge mismatch is an integer number of polarisation quanta.
  • We study the ground state orbital ordering of $LaMnO_3$, at weak electron-phonon coupling, when the spin state is A-type antiferromagnet. We determine the orbital ordering by extending to our Jahn-Teller system a recently developed Peierls instability framework for the Holstein model [1]. By using two-dimensional dynamic response functions corresponding to a mixed Jahn-Teller mode, we establish that the $Q_2$ mode determines the orbital order.
  • The physics of oxide superlattices is considered for pristine (001) multilayers of the band insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 with alternating p and n interfaces. First principles results and a model of capacitor plates offer a simple paradigm to understand their dielectric properties and the insulator to metal transition (IMT) at interfaces with increasing layer thickness. The charge at insulating interfaces is found to be as predicted from the formal ionic charges, not populations. Different relative layer thicknesses produce a spontaneous polarization of the system, and allow manipulation of the interfacial electron gas. Large piezoresistance effects can be obtained from the sensitivity of the IMT to lateral strain. Carrier densities are found to be ideal for exciton condensation.
  • We analyse the spatial and temporal coherence properties of a two-dimensional and finite sized polariton condensate with parameters tailored to the recent experiments which have shown spontaneous and thermal equilibrium polariton condensation in a CdTe microcavity [J. Kasprzak, M. Richard, S. Kundermann, A. Baas, P. Jeambrun, J.M.J. Keeling, F.M. Marchetti, M.H. Szymanska, R. Andre, J.L. Staehli, et al., Nature 443 (7110) (2006) 409]. We obtain a theoretical estimate of the thermal length, the lengthscale over which full coherence effectively exists (and beyond which power-law decay of correlations in a two-dimensional condensate occurs), of the order of 5 micrometers. In addition, the exponential decay of temporal coherence predicted for a finite size system is consistent with that found in the experiment. From our analysis of the luminescence spectra of the polariton condensate, taking into account pumping and decay, we obtain a dispersionless region at small momenta of the order of 4 degrees. In addition, we determine the polariton linewidth as a function of the pump power. Finally, we discuss how, by increasing the exciton-photon detuning, it is in principle possible to move the threshold for condensation from a region of the phase diagram where polaritons can be described as a weakly interacting Bose gas to a region where instead the composite nature of polaritons becomes important.
  • The first realization of a polariton condensate was recently achieved in a CdTe microcavity [Kasprzak et al., Nature 443, 409 (2006)]. We compare the experimental phase boundaries, for various detunings and cryostat temperatures, with those found theoretically from a model which accounts for features of microcavity polaritons such as reduced dimensionality, internal composite structure, disorder in the quantum wells, polariton-polariton interactions, and finite lifetime.
  • The spin- and charge-density-wave order parameters of the itinerant antiferromagnet chromium are measured directly with non-resonant x-ray diffraction as the system is driven towards its quantum critical point with high pressure using a diamond anvil cell. The exponential decrease of the spin and charge diffraction intensities with pressure confirms the harmonic scaling of spin and charge, while the evolution of the incommensurate ordering vector provides important insight into the difference between pressure and chemical doping as means of driving quantum phase transitions. Measurement of the charge density wave over more than two orders of magnitude of diffraction intensity provides the clearest demonstration to date of a weakly-coupled, BCS-like ground state. Evidence for the coexistence of this weakly-coupled ground state with high-energy excitations and pseudogap formation above the ordering temperature in chromium, the charge-ordered perovskite manganites, and the blue bronzes, among other such systems, raises fundamental questions about the distinctions between weak and strong coupling.
  • We investigate and compare different optical probes of a condensed state of microcavity polaritons in expected experimental conditions of non-resonant pumping. We show that the energy- and momentum-resolved resonant Rayleigh signal provide a distinctive probe of condensation as compared to, e.g., photoluminescence emission. In particular, the presence of a collective sound mode both above and below the chemical potential can be observed, as well as features directly related to the density of states of particle-hole like excitations. Both resonant Rayleigh response and the absorption and photoluminescence, are affected by the presence of quantum well disorder, which introduces a distribution of oscillator strengths between quantum well excitons at a given energy and cavity photons at a given momentum. As we show, this distribution makes it important that in the condensed regime, scattering by disorder is taken into account to all orders. We show that, in the low density linear limit, this approach correctly describes inhomogeneous broadening of polaritons. In addition, in this limit, we extract a linear blue-shift of the lower polariton versus density, with a coefficient determined by temperature and by a characteristic disorder length.