• We present results from a survey of 70 radio galaxies (RGs) at redshifts 1<z<5.2 using the PACS and SPIRE on-board Herschel. Combined with existing mid-IR photometry from Spitzer and observations obtained with LABOCA, the SEDs of galaxies in our sample are continuously covered across 3.6-870um. The total infrared luminosities of these RGs are such that they almost all are either ultra-or hyper-luminous infrared galaxies. We fit the infrared SEDs with a set of empirical templates which represent dust heated (1) by a variety of SB and (2) by a AGN. We find that the SEDs of RGs require the dust to be heated by both AGN and SB, but the luminosities of these two components are not strongly correlated. Assuming empirical relations and simple physical assumptions, we calculate the SFR, the black hole mass accretion rate (MdotBH), and the black hole mass (MBH) for each RG. We find that the host galaxies and their BHs are growing extremely rapidly, having SFR~100-5000 Msun/yr and MdotBH~1-100 Msun/yr. The mean sSFR of RGs at z>2.5 are higher than the sSFR of typical star-forming galaxies over the same redshift range but are similar or perhaps lower than the galaxy population for RGs at z<2.5. By comparing the sSFR and the specific black hole mass accretion rate, we conclude that BHs in radio loud AGN are already, or soon will be, overly massive compared to their host galaxies in terms of expectations from the local MBH-MGal relation. In order to ``catch up'' with the BH, the galaxies require about an order-of magnitude more time to grow in mass, at the observed SFRs, compared to the time the BH is actively accreting. However, during the current cycle of activity, we argue that this catching-up is likely to be difficult due to the short gas depletion times. Finally, we speculate on how the host galaxies might grow sufficiently in stellar mass to ultimately fall onto the local MBH-MGal relation.
  • We present Herschel observations at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron of the environment of the radio galaxy 4C+41.17 at z = 3.792. About 65% of the extracted sources are securely identified with mid-IR sources observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8 and 24 micron. We derive simple photometric redshifts, also including existing 850 micron and 1200 micron data, using templates of AGN, starburst-dominated systems and evolved stellar populations. We find that most of the Herschel sources are foreground to the radio galaxy and therefore do not belong to a structure associated with 4C+41.17. We do, however, find that the SED of the closest (~ 25" offset) source to the radio galaxy is fully consistent with being at the same redshift as 4C+41.17. We show that finding such a bright source that close to the radio galaxy at the same redshift is a very unlikely event, making the environment of 4C+41.17 a special case. We demonstrate that multi-wavelength data, in particular on the Rayleigh-Jeans side of the spectral energy distribution, allow us to confirm or rule out the presence of protocluster candidates that were previously selected by single wavelength data sets.
  • We present a detailed study of the infrared spectral energy distribution of the high-redshift radio galaxy MRC 1138-26 at z = 2.156, also known as the Spiderweb Galaxy. By combining photometry from Spitzer, Herschel and LABOCA we fit the rest-frame 5-300 um emission using a two component, starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN), model. The total infrared (8 - 1000 um) luminosity of this galaxy is (1.97+/-0.28)x10^13 Lsun with (1.17+/-0.27) and (0.79+/-0.09)x10^13 Lsun due to the AGN and starburst components respectively. The high derived AGN accretion rate of \sim20% Eddington, and the measured star formation rate (SFR) of 1390pm150 Msun/yr, suggest that this massive system is in a special phase of rapid central black hole and host galaxy growth, likely caused by a gas rich merger in a dense environment. The accretion rate is sufficient to power both the jets and the previously observed large outflow. The high SFR and strong outflow suggest this galaxy could potentially exhaust its fuel for stellar growth in a few tens of Myr, although the likely merger of the radio galaxy with nearby satellites suggest bursts of star formation may recur again on time scales of several hundreds of Myr. The age of the radio lobes implies the jet started after the current burst of star formation, and therefore we are possibly witnessing the transition from a merger-induced starburst phase to a radio-loud AGN phase. We also note tentative evidence for [CII]158um emission. This paper marks the first results from the Herschel Galaxy Evolution Project (Project HeRGE), a systematic study of the evolutionary state of 71 high redshift, 1 < z < 5.2, radio galaxies.
  • Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have obtained rest frame 9-16mu spectra of 11 quasars and 9 radio galaxies from the 3CRR catalog at redshifts 1.0<z<1.4. This complete flux-limited 178MHz-selected sample is unbiased with respect to orientation and therefore suited to study orientation-dependent effects in the most powerful active galactic nuclei (AGN). The mean radio galaxy spectrum shows a clear silicate absorption feature (tau_9.7mu = 1.1) whereas the mean quasar spectrum shows silicates in emission. The mean radio galaxy spectrum matches a dust-absorbed mean quasar spectrum in both shape and overall flux level. The data for individual objects conform to these results. The trend of the silicate depth to increase with decreasing core fraction of the radio source further supports that for this sample, orientation is the main driver for the difference between radio galaxies and quasars, as predicted by AGN unification. However, comparing our high-z sample with lower redshift 3CRR objects reveals that the absorption of the high-z radio galaxy MIR continuum is lower than expected from a scaled up version of lower luminosity sources, and we discuss some effects that may explain these trends.
  • Radio astronomy is entering the era of large surveys. This paper describes the plans for wide surveys with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and their synergy with large surveys at higher frequencies (in particular in the 1-2 GHz band) that will be possible using future facilities like Apertif or ASKAP. The LOFAR Survey Key Science Project aims at conducting large-sky surveys at 15, 30, 60, 120 and 200 MHz taking advantage of the wide instantaneous field of view and of the unprecedented sensitivity of this instrument. Four topics have been identified as drivers for these surveys covering the formation of massive galaxies, clusters and black holes using z>6 radio galaxies as probes, the study of the intercluster magnetic fields using diffuse radio emission and Faraday rotation measures in galaxy clusters as probes and the study of star formation processes in the early Universe using starburst galaxies as probes. The fourth topic is the exploration of new parameter space for serendipitous discovery taking advantage of the new observational spectral window open up by LOFAR. Here, we briefly discuss the requirements of the proposed surveys to address these (and many others!) topics as well as the synergy with other wide area surveys planned at higher frequencies (and in particular in the 1-2 GHz band) with new radio facilities like ASKAP and Apertif. The complementary information provided by these surveys will be crucial for detailed studies of the spectral shape of a variety of radio sources (down to sub-mJy sources) and for studies of the ISM (in particular HI and OH) in nearby galaxies.
  • We used the mm/sub-mm receivers on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) to observe the CO J=3--2, 2--1 lines in five local, optically powerful AGN and the J=4--3 line in 3C 293 (a powerful radio galaxy). Luminous CO J=3--2 emission and high CO (3--2)/(1--0) intensity ratios are found in all objects, indicating highly excited molecular gas. In 3C 293 an exceptionally bright CO J=4--3 line is found which cannot be easily explained given its quiescent star-forming environment and low AGN X-ray luminosity. In this object shocks emanating from a well-known interaction of a powerful jet with a dense ISM may be responsible for the high excitation of its molecular gas on galaxy-wide scales. Star formation can readily account for the gas excitation in the rest of the objects, although high X-ray AGN luminosities can also contribute significantly in two cases. Measuring and eventually imaging CO line ratios in local luminous QSO hosts can be done by a partially completed ALMA during its early phases of commissioning, promising a sensitive probe of starburst versus AGN activity in obscured environments at high linear resolutions.
  • AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from the mid- to far-infrared. The instruments also have the capability for imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2 - 180 micron in the pointed observation mode, occasionally inserted into the continuous survey operation. The in-orbit cryogen lifetime is expected to be one and a half years. The All-Sky Survey will cover more than 90 percent of the whole sky with higher spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage than that of the previous IRAS all-sky survey. Point source catalogues of the All-Sky Survey will be released to the astronomical community. The pointed observations will be used for deep surveys of selected sky areas and systematic observations of important astronomical targets. These will become an additional future heritage of this mission.
  • The uncertainty surrounding the nature of the heating mechanism for the dust that emits at mid- to far-IR (MFIR) wavelengths in active galaxies limits our understanding of the links between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxy evolution, as well as our ability to interpret the prodigious infrared and sub-mm emission of some of the most distant galaxies in the Universe. Here we report deep Spitzer observations of a complete sample of powerful, intermediate redshift (0.05 < z < 0.7) radio galaxies and quasars. We show that AGN power, as traced by [OIII]5007 emission, is strongly correlated with both the mid-IR (24 micron) and the far-IR (70 micron) luminosities, however, with increased scatter in the 70 micron correlation. A major cause of this increased scatter is a group of objects that falls above the main correlation and displays evidence for prodigious recent star formation activity at optical wavelengths, along with relatively cool MFIR colours. These results provide evidence that illumination by the AGN is the primary heating mechanism for the dust emitting at both 24 and 70 microns, with starbursts dominating the heating of the cool dust in only 20 -- 30% of objects. This implies that powerful AGN are not always accompanied by the type of luminous starbursts that are characteristic of the peak of activity in major gas-rich mergers.