• Starting in December 2014, Kepler K2 observed Neptune continuously for 49 days at a 1-minute cadence. The goals consisted of studying its atmospheric dynamics (Simon et al. 2016), detecting its global acoustic oscillations (Rowe et al., submitted), and those of the Sun, which we report on here. We present the first indirect detection of solar oscillations in intensity measurements. Beyond the remarkable technical performance, it indicates how Kepler would see a star like the Sun. The result from the global asteroseismic approach, which consists of measuring the oscillation frequency at maximum amplitude "nu_max" and the mean frequency separation between mode overtones "Delta nu", is surprising as the nu_max measured from Neptune photometry is larger than the accepted value. Compared to the usual reference nu_max_sun = 3100 muHz, the asteroseismic scaling relations therefore make the solar mass and radius appear larger by 13.8 +/- 5.8 % and 4.3 +/- 1.9 % respectively. The higher nu_max is caused by a combination of the value of nu_max_sun, being larger at the time of observations than the usual reference from SOHO/VIRGO/SPM data (3160 +/- 10 muHz), and the noise level of the K2 time series, being ten times larger than VIRGO's. The peak-bagging method provides more consistent results: despite a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we model ten overtones for degrees l=0,1,2. We compare the K2 data with simultaneous SOHO/VIRGO/SPM photometry and BiSON velocity measurements. The individual frequencies, widths, and amplitudes mostly match those from VIRGO and BiSON within 1 sigma, except for the few peaks with lowest SNR.
  • Context. The object HD 43587Aa is a G0V star observed during the 145-day LRa03 run of the COnvection, ROtation and planetary Transits space mission (CoRoT), for which complementary High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectra with S/N>300 were also obtained. Its visual magnitude is 5.71, and its effective temperature is close to 5950 K. It has a known companion in a highly eccentric orbit and is also coupled with two more distant companions. Aims. We undertake a preliminary investigation of the internal structure of HD 43587Aa. Methods. We carried out a seismic analysis of the star, using maximum likelihood estimators and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. Results. We established the first table of the eigenmode frequencies, widths, and heights for HD 43587Aa. The star appears to have a mass and a radius slightly larger than the Sun, and is slightly older (5.6 Gyr). Two scenarios are suggested for the geometry of the star: either its inclination angle is very low, or the rotation velocity of the star is very low. Conclusions. A more detailed study of the rotation and of the magnetic and chromospheric activity for this star is needed, and will be the subject of a further study. New high resolution spectrometric observations should be performed for at least several months in duration.
  • The Solar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper (SODISM) on board the PICARD space mission provides wide-field images of the photosphere and chromosphere of the Sun in five narrow pass bands (centered at 215.0, 393.37, 535.7, 607.1, and 782.2 nm). PICARD is a space mission, which was successfully launched on 15 June 2010 into a Sun synchronous dawn-dusk orbit. It represents a European asset aiming at collecting solar observations that can serve to estimate some of the inputs to Earth climate models. The scientific payload consists of the SODISM imager and of two radiometers, SOVAP (SOlar VAriability PICARD) and PREMOS (PREcision MOnitor Sensor), which carry out measurements that allow estimating the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the middle ultraviolet to the red. The SODISM telescope monitors solar activity continuously. It thus produces images that can also feed SSI reconstruction models. Further, the objectives of SODISM encompass the probing of the interior of the Sun via helioseismic analysis of observations in intensity (on the solar disc and at the limb), and via astrometric investigations at the limb. The latter addresses especially the spectral dependence of the radial limb shape, and the temporal evolution of the solar diameter and asphericity. After a brief review of its original science objectives, this paper presents the detailed design of the SODISM instrument, its expected performance, and the scheme of its flight operations. Some observations with SODISM are presented and discussed.
  • We present a detailed abundance study based on spectroscopic data obtained with HARPS of two solar-analogue main targets for the asteroseismology programme of the CoRoT satellite: HD 42618 and HD 43587. The atmospheric parameters and chemical composition are accurately determined through a fully differential analysis with respect to the Sun observed with the same instrumental set-up. Several sources of systematic errors largely cancel out with this approach, which allows us to narrow down the 1-sigma error bars to typically 20 K in effective temperature, 0.04 dex in surface gravity, and less than 0.05 dex in the elemental abundances. Although HD 42618 fulfils many requirements for being classified as a solar twin, its slight deficiency in metals and its possibly younger age indicate that, strictly speaking, it does not belong to this class of objects. On the other hand, HD 43587 is slightly more massive and evolved. In addition, marked differences are found in the amount of lithium present in the photospheres of these two stars, which might reveal different mixing properties in their interiors. These results will put tight constraints on the forthcoming theoretical modelling of their solar-like oscillations and contribute to increase our knowledge of the fundamental parameters and internal structure of stars similar to our Sun.
  • We investigate the asteroseismology of two solar-like targets as observed with the CoRoT satellite, with particular attention paid to the mode fitting. HD 181420 and HD 49933 are typical CoRoT solar-like targets (156 and 60-day runs). The low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of about 3-10 prevents us from unambiguously identifying the individual oscillation modes. In particular, convergence problems appear at the edges of the oscillation spectrum. HD 181420 and HD 49933 are typical CoRoT solar-like targets (156 and 60-day runs). The low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of about 3-10 prevents us from unambiguously identifying the individual oscillation modes. In particular, convergence problems appear at the edges of the oscillation spectrum. We apply a Bayesian approach to the analysis of these data. We compare the global fitting of the power spectra of this time series, obtained by the classical maximum likelihood (MLE) and the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimators. We examine the impact of the choice of the priors upon the fitted parameters. We also propose to reduce the number of free parameters in the fitting, by replacing the individual estimate of mode height associated with each overtone by a continuous function of frequency (Gaussian profile). The MAP appears as a powerful tool to constrain the global fits, but it must be used carefully and only with reliable priors. The mode width of the stars increases with the frequency over all the oscillation spectrum.
  • Solar flares presumably have an impact on the deepest layers of the solar atmosphere and yet the observational evidence for such an impact is scarce. Using ten years of measurements of the Na D$_{1}$ and Na D$_2$ Fraunhofer lines, measured by GOLF onboard SOHO, we show that this photospheric line is indeed affected by flares. The effect of individual flares is hidden by solar oscillations, but a statistical analysis based on conditional averaging reveals a clear signature. Although GOLF can only probe one single wavelength at a time, we show that both wings of the Na line can nevertheless be compared. The varying line asymmetry can be interpreted as an upward plasma motion from the lower solar atmosphere during the peak of the flare, followed by a downward motion.
  • The star HD 49385 is the first G-type solar-like pulsator observed in the seismology field of the space telescope CoRoT. The satellite collected 137 days of high-precision photometric data on this star, confirming that it presents solar-like oscillations. HD 49385 was also observed in spectroscopy with the NARVAL spectrograph in January 2009. Our goal is to characterize HD 49385 using both spectroscopic and seismic data. The fundamental stellar parameters of HD 49385 are derived with the semi-automatic software VWA, and the projected rotational velocity is estimated by fitting synthetic profiles to isolated lines in the observed spectrum. A maximum likelihood estimation is used to determine the parameters of the observed p modes. We perform a global fit, in which modes are fitted simultaneously over nine radial orders, with degrees ranging from l=0 to l=3 (36 individual modes). Precise estimates of the atmospheric parameters (Teff, [M/H], log g) and of the vsini of HD 49385 are obtained. The seismic analysis of the star leads to a clear identification of the modes for degrees l=0,1,2. Around the maximum of the signal (nu=1013 microHz), some peaks are found significant and compatible with the expected characteristics of l=3 modes. Our fit yields robust estimates of the frequencies, linewidths and amplitudes of the modes. We find amplitudes of about 5.6 +/- 0.8 ppm for radial modes at the maximum of the signal. The lifetimes of the modes range from one day (at high frequency) to a bit more than two days (at low frequency). Significant peaks are found outside the identified ridges and are fitted. They are attributed to mixed modes.
  • Jan. 18, 2010 astro-ph.SR
    We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5d of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: About 20 modes of oscillation may be clearly distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, use the frequencies and frequency separations to provide first results on the radii, masses and ages of the stars, and comment in the light of these results on prospects for inference on other solar-type stars that Kepler will observe.
  • Context. The CoRoT short runs give us the opportunity to observe a large variety of late-type stars through their solar-like oscillations. We report observations of the star HD175726 that lasted for 27 days during the first short run of the mission. The time series reveals a high-activity signal and the power spectrum presents an excess due to solar-like oscillations with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Aims. Our aim is to identify the most efficient tools to extract as much information as possible from the power density spectrum. Methods. The most productive method appears to be the autocorrelation of the time series, calculated as the spectrum of the filtered spectrum. This method is efficient, very rapid computationally, and will be useful for the analysis of other targets, observed with CoRoT or with forthcoming missions such as Kepler and Plato. Results. The mean large separation has been measured to be 97.2+-0.5 microHz, slightly below the expected value determined from solar scaling laws.We also show strong evidence for variation of the large separation with frequency. The bolometric mode amplitude is only 1.7+-0.25 ppm for radial modes, which is 1.7 times less than expected. Due to the low signal-to-noise ratio, mode identification is not possible for the available data set of HD175726. Conclusions. This study shows the possibility of extracting a seismic signal despite a signal-to-noise ratio of only 0.37. The observation of such a target shows the efficiency of the CoRoT data, and the potential benefit of longer observing runs.
  • Context: The F8 star HD 181906 (effective temperature ~6300K) was observed for 156 days by the CoRoT satellite during the first long run in the centre direction. Analysis of the data reveals a spectrum of solar-like acoustic oscillations. However, the faintness of the target (m_v=7.65) means the signal-to-noise (S/N) in the acoustic modes is quite low, and this low S/N leads to complications in the analysis. Aims: To extract global variables of the star as well as key parameters of the p modes observed in the power spectrum of the lightcurve. Methods: The power spectrum of the lightcurve, a wavelet transform and spot fitting have been used to obtain the average rotation rate of the star and its inclination angle. Then, the autocorrelation of the power spectrum and the power spectrum of the power spectrum were used to properly determine the large separation. Finally, estimations of the mode parameters have been done by maximizing the likelihood of a global fit, where several modes were fit simultaneously. Results: We have been able to infer the mean surface rotation rate of the star (~4 microHz) with indications of the presence of surface differential rotation, the large separation of the p modes (~87 microHz), and therefore also the ridges corresponding to overtones of the acoustic modes.
  • Local-box hydrodynamical model atmospheres provide statistical information about a star's emergent radiation field which allows one to predict the level of its granulation-related micro-variability. Space-based photometry is now sufficiently accurate to test model predictions. We aim to model the photometric granulation background of HD49933 as well as the Sun, and compare the predictions to the measurements obtained by the COROT and SOHO satellite missions. We construct hydrodynamical model atmospheres representing HD49933 and the Sun, and use a previously developed scaling technique to obtain the observable disk-integrated brightness fluctuations. We further performed exploratory magneto-hydrodynamical simulations to gauge the impact of small scale magnetic fields on the synthetic light-curves. We find that the granulation-related brightness fluctuations depend on metallicity. We obtain a satisfactory correspondence between prediction and observation for the Sun, validating our approach. For HD49933, we arrive at a significant over-estimation by a factor of two to three in total power. Locally generated magnetic fields are unlikely to be responsible, otherwise existing fields would need to be rather strong to sufficiently suppress the granulation signal. Presently suggested updates on the fundamental stellar parameters do not improve the correspondence; however, an ad-hoc increase of the HD49933 surface gravity by about 0.2dex would eliminate most of the discrepancy. We diagnose a puzzling discrepancy between the predicted and observed granulation background in HD49933, with only rather ad-hoc ideas for remedies at hand.
  • The space experiment CoRoT has recently detected transits by a hot Jupiter across the disc of an active G7V star (CoRoT-Exo-2a) that can be considered as a good proxy for the Sun at an age of approximately 0.5 Gyr. We present a spot modelling of the optical variability of the star during 142 days of uninterrupted observations performed by CoRoT with unprecedented photometric precision. We apply spot modelling approaches previously tested in the case of the Sun by modelling total solar irradiance variations. To model the light curve of CoRoT-Exo-2a, we take into account both the photometric effects of cool spots as well as those of solar-like faculae, adopting solar analogy. Two active longitudes initially on opposite hemispheres are found on the photosphere of CoRoT-Exo-2a with a rotation period of 4.522 $\pm$ 0.024 days. Their separation changes by approximately 80 degrees during the time span of the observations. From this variation, a relative amplitude of the surface differential rotation lower than about 1 percent is estimated. Individual spots form within the active longitudes and show an angular velocity about 1 percent smaller than that of the longitude pattern. The total spotted area shows a cyclic oscillation with a period of 28.9 $\pm$ 4.3 days, which is close to 10 times the synodic period of the planet as seen by the rotating active longitudes. The implications of such results for the internal rotation of CoRoT-Exo-2a are discussed on the basis of solar analogy. A possible magnetic star-planet interaction is suggested by the cyclic variation of the spotted area. Alternatively, the 28.9-d cycle may be related to Rossby-type waves propagating in the subphotospheric layers of the star.
  • We report on the results of the latest solarFLAG hare-and-hounds exercise, which was concerned with testing methods for extraction of frequencies of low-degree solar p modes from data collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. We have used the new solarFLAG simulator, which includes the effects of correlated mode excitation and correlations with background noise, to make artificial timeseries data that mimic Doppler velocity observations of the Sun as a star. The correlations give rise to asymmetry of mode peaks in the frequency power spectrum. Ten members of the group (the hounds) applied their ``peak bagging'' codes to a 3456-day dataset, and the estimated mode frequencies were returned to the hare (who was WJC) for comparison. Analysis of the results reveals a systematic bias in the estimated frequencies of modes above approximately 1.8 mHz. The bias is negative, meaning the estimated frequencies systematically underestimate the input frequencies. We identify two sources that are the dominant contributions to the frequency bias. Both sources involve failure to model accurately subtle aspects of the observed power spectral density in the part (window) of the frequency power spectrum that is being fitted. One source of bias arises from a failure to account for the power spectral density coming from all those modes whose frequencies lie outside the fitting windows. The other source arises from a failure to account for the power spectral density of the weak l=4 and 5 modes, which are often ignored in Sun-as-a-star analysis. The Sun-as-a-star peak-bagging codes need to allow for both sources, otherwise the frequencies are likely to be biased.
  • Photometry of Procyon obtained by the MOST satellite in 2004 has been searched for p modes by several groups, with sometimes contradictory interpretations. We explore two possible factors that complicate the analysis and may lead to erroneous reports of p modes in these data. Two methods are used to illustrate the role of subtle instrumental effects in the photometry: time-frequency analysis, and a search for regularly spaced peaks in a Fourier spectrum based on the echelle diagramme approach. We find no convincing evidence of a p-mode signal in the MOST Procyon data. We can account for an apparent excess of power close to the p-mode frequency range and signs of structure in an echelle diagramme in terms of instrumental effects.
  • We present here the set of corrections that will be applied to the raw data of the CoRoT mission. The aim is to correct the data for instrumental and environmental perturbations as well as to optimize the duty-cycle, in order to reach the expected performances of the mission. The main corrections are : the correction of the electromagnetic interferences, suppression of outliers, the background correction, the jitter correction and the correction of the integration time variations. We focus here on these corrections and emphasize their efficiency.
  • We report on results from the first solar Fitting at Low-Angular degree Group (solar FLAG) hare-and-hounds exercise. The group is concerned with the development of methods for extracting the parameters of low-l solar p mode data (`peak bagging'), collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. Accurate and precise estimation of the fundamental parameters of the p modes is a vital pre-requisite of all subsequent studies. Nine members of the FLAG (the `hounds') fitted an artificial 3456-d dataset. The dataset was made by the `hare' (WJC) to simulate full-disc Doppler velocity observations of the Sun. The rotational frequency splittings of the l=1, 2 and 3 modes were the first parameter estimates chosen for scrutiny. Significant differences were uncovered at l=2 and 3 between the fitted splittings of the hounds. Evidence is presented that suggests this unwanted bias had its origins in several effects. The most important came from the different way in which the hounds modeled the visibility ratio of the different rotationally split components. Our results suggest that accurate modelling of the ratios is vital to avoid the introduction of significant bias in the estimated splittings. This is of importance not only for studies of the Sun, but also of the solar analogues that will targets for asteroseismic campaigns.
  • The solar magnetism is no more considered as a purely superficial phenomenon. The SoHO community has shown that the length of the solar cycle depends on the transition region between radiation and convection. Nevertheless, the internal solar (stellar) magnetism stays poorly known. Starting in 2008, the American instrument HMI/SDO and the European microsatellite PICARD will enrich our view of the Sun-Earth relationship. Thus obtaining a complete MHD solar picture is a clear objective for the next decades and it requires complementary observations of the dynamics of the radiative zone. For that ambitious goal, space prototypes are being developed to improve gravity mode detection. The Sun is unique to progress on the topology of deep internal magnetic fields and to understand the complex mechanisms which provoke photospheric and coronal magnetic changes and possible longer cycles important for human life. We propose the following roadmap in Europe to contribute to this "impressive" revolution in Astronomy and in our Sun-Earth relationship: SoHO (1995-2007), PICARD (2008-2010), DynaMICS (2009-2017) in parallel to SDO (2008-2017) then a world-class mission located at the L1 orbit or above the solar poles.
  • Recent studies have established that peaks in solar oscillation power spectra are not Lorentzian in shape, but have a distinct asymmetry. Fitting a symmetric Lorentzian profile to the peaks therefore produces a shift in frequency of the modes. Accurate determination of low-frequency modes is essential to infer the structure of the solar core by inversion of the mode frequencies. In this paper we investigate how the changes in frequencies of low-degree modes obtained by fitting symmetric and asymmetric peak profiles change the inferred properties of the solar core. We use data obtained by the Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies (GOLF) project on board the SoHO spacecraft. Two different solar models and inversion procedures are used to invert the data to determine the sound speed in the solar core. We find that for a given set of modes no significant difference in the inferred sound-speed results from taking asymmetry into account when fitting the low-degree modes.