• X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are the only sources currently able to produce bright few-fs pulses with tunable photon energies from 100 eV to more than 10 keV. Due to the stochastic SASE operating principles and other technical issues the output pulses are subject to large fluctuations, making it necessary to characterize the x-ray pulses on every shot for data sorting purposes. We present a technique that applies machine learning tools to predict x-ray pulse properties using simple electron beam and x-ray parameters as input. Using this technique at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we report mean errors below 0.3 eV for the prediction of the photon energy at 530 eV and below 1.6 fs for the prediction of the delay between two x-ray pulses. We also demonstrate spectral shape prediction with a mean agreement of 97%. This approach could potentially be used at the next generation of high-repetition-rate XFELs to provide accurate knowledge of complex x-ray pulses at the full repetition rate.
  • X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered photons with an energy near 18 keV generated from solid beryllium irradiated by 8.8-9.75 keV XFEL pulses. The intensity in the X-ray focus reaches up to 4x20 W/cm2, which corresponds to a peak electric field two orders of magnitude higher than the atomic unit of field-strength and within four orders of magnitude of the quantum electrodynamic critical field. The observed signal scales quadratically in intensity and is emitted into a non-dipolar pattern, consistent with the simultaneous two-photon scattering from free electrons. However, the energy of the generated photons shows an anomalously large redshift only present at high intensities. This indicates that the instantaneous high-intensity scattering effectively interacts with a different electron momentum distribution than linear Compton scattering, with implications for the study of atomic-scale structure and dynamics of matter
  • We study the influence of phase matching on interference minima in high harmonic spectra. We concentrate on structures in atoms due to interference of different angular momentum channels during recombination. We use the Cooper minimum (CM) in argon at 47 eV as a marker in the harmonic spectrum. We measure 2d harmonic spectra in argon as a function of wavelength and angular divergence. While we identify a clear CM in the spectrum when the target gas jet is placed after the laser focus, we find that the appearance of the CM varies with angular divergence and can even be completely washed out when the gas jet is placed closer to the focus. We also show that the argon CM appears at different wavelengths in harmonic and photo-absorption spectra measured under conditions independent of any wavelength calibration. We model the experiment with a simulation based on coupled solutions of the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation and the Maxwell wave equation, including both the single atom response and macroscopic effects of propagation. The single atom calculations confirm that the ground state of argon can be represented by its field free $p$ symmetry, despite the strong laser field used in high harmonic generation. Because of this, the CM structure in the harmonic spectrum can be described as the interference of continuum $s$ and $d$ channels, whose relative phase jumps by $\pi$ at the CM energy, resulting in a minimum shifted from the photoionization result. We also show that the full calculations reproduce the dependence of the CM on the macroscopic conditions. We calculate simple phase matching factors as a function of harmonic order and explain our experimental and theoretical observation in terms of the effect of phase matching on the shape of the harmonic spectrum. Phase matching must be taken into account to fully understand spectral features related to HHG spectroscopy.
  • We demonstrate an information hiding and retrieval scheme with the relative phases between states in a Rydberg wave packet acting as the bits of a data register. We use a terahertz half-cycle pulse (HCP) to transfer phase-encoded information from an optically accessible angular momentum manifold to another manifold which is not directly accessed by our laser pulses, effectively hiding the information from our optical interferometric measurement techniques. A subsequent HCP acting on these wave packets reintroduces the information back into the optically accessible data register manifold which can then be `read' out.
  • A kick from a unipolar half-cycle pulse (HCP) can redistribute population and shift the relative phase between states in a radial Rydberg wave packet. We have measured the quantum coherence properties following the kick, and show that selected coherences can be destroyed by applying an HCP at specific times. Quantum mechanical simulations show that this is due to redistribution of the angular momentum in the presence of noise. These results have implications for the storage and retrieval of quantum information in the wave packet.
  • Genetic learning algorithms are widely used to control ultrafast optical pulse shapes for photo-induced quantum control of atoms and molecules. An unresolved issue is how to use the solutions found by these algorithms to learn about the system's quantum dynamics. We propose a simple method based on covariance analysis of the control space, which can reveal the degrees of freedom in the effective control Hamiltonian. We have applied this technique to stimulated Raman scattering in liquid methanol. A simple model of two-mode stimulated Raman scattering is consistent with the results.
  • We probe the dynamic evolution of a Stark wave packet in cesium using weak half-cycle pulses (HCP's). The state-selective field ionization(SSFI) spectra taken as a function of HCP delay reveal wave packet dynamics such as Kepler beats, Stark revivals and fractional revivals. A quantum-mechanical simulation explains the results as multi-mode interference induced by the HCP.
  • We explore coherent control of stimulated Raman scattering in the nonimpulsive regime. Optical pulse shaping of the coherent pump field leads to control over the stimulated Raman output. A model of the control mechanism is investigated.
  • We study coherent strain in (001) Ge generated by an ultrafast laser-initiated high density electron-hole plasma. The resultant coherent pulse is probed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction through changes in the anomalous transmission. The acoustic pulse front is driven by ambipolar diffusion of the electron-hole plasma and propagates into the crystal at supersonic speeds. Simulations of the strain including electron-phonon coupling, modified by carrier diffusion and Auger recombination, are in good agreement with the observed dynamics.
  • We have constructed an automated learning apparatus to control quantum systems. By directing intense shaped ultrafast laser pulses into a variety of samples and using a measurement of the system as a feedback signal, we are able to reshape the laser pulses to direct the system into a desired state. The feedback signal is the input to an adaptive learning algorithm. This algorithm programs a computer-controlled, acousto-optic modulator pulse shaper. The learning algorithm generates new shaped laser pulses based on the success of previous pulses in achieving a predetermined goal.
  • We employ Optimal Control Theory to discover an efficient information retrieval algorithm that can be performed on a Rydberg atom data register using a shaped terahertz pulse. The register is a Rydberg wave packet with one consituent orbital phase-reversed from the others (the ``marked bit''). The terahertz pulse that performs the decoding algorithm does so by by driving electron probability density into the marked orbital. Its shape is calculated by modifying the target of an optimal control problem so that it represents the direct product of all correct solutions to the algorithm.
  • Pump-probe time-resolved x-ray diffraction of allowed and nearly forbidden reflections in InSb is used to follow the propagation of a coherent acoustic pulse generated by ultrafast laser-excitation. The surface and bulk components of the strain could be simultaneously measured due to the large x-ray penetration depth. Comparison of the experimental data with dynamical diffraction simulations suggests that the conventional model for impulsively generated strain underestimates the partitioning of energy into coherent modes.
  • A terahertz half-cycle pulse was used to retrieve information stored as quantum phase in an $N$-state Rydberg atom data register. The register was prepared as a wave packet with one state phase-reversed from the others (the "marked bit"). A half-cycle pulse then drove a significant portion of the electron probability into the flipped state via multimode interference.