• We systematically study the high-resolution and polarized Raman spectra of multilayer (ML) MoTe2. The layer-breathing (LB) and shear (C) modes are observed in the ultralow-frequency region, which are used to quantitatively evaluate the interlayer coupling in ML MoTe2 based on the linear chain model, in which only the nearest interlayer coupling is considered. The Raman spectra on three different substrates verify the negligible substrate effect on the phonon frequencies of ML MoTe2. Ten excitation energies are used to measure the high-frequency modes of N-layer MoTe2 (NL MoTe2; N is an integer). Under the resonant excitation condition, we observe N-dependent Davydov components in ML MoTe2 , originating from the Raman-active A'1(A21g) modes at ~172 cm-1. More than two Davydov components are observed in NL MoTe2 for N larger than 4 by Raman spectroscopy. The N-dependent Davydov components are further investigated based on the symmetry analysis. A van der Waals model only considering the nearest interlayer coupling has been proposed to well understand the Davydov splitting of high-frequency A'1(A21g) modes. The different resonant profiles for the two Davydov components in 3L MoTe2 indicate that proper excitation energy of ~1.8-2.2 eV must be chosen to observe the Davydov splitting in ML MoTe2 . Our work presents a simple way to identify layer number of ultrathin MoTe2 flakes by the corresponding number and peak position of Davydov components. Our work also provides a direct evidence from Raman spectroscopy of how the nearest van der Waals interactions significantly affect the frequency of the high-frequency intralayer phonon modes in multilayer MoTe2 and expands the understanding on the lattice vibrations and interlayer coupling of transition metal dichalcogenides and other two-dimensional materials.
  • In monolayer MoS2 optical transitions across the direct bandgap are governed by chiral selection rules, allowing optical valley initialization. In time resolved photoluminescence (PL) experiments we find that both the polarization and emission dynamics do not change from 4K to 300K within our time resolution. We measure a high polarization and show that under pulsed excitation the emission polarization significantly decreases with increasing laser power. We find a fast exciton emission decay time on the order of 4ps. The absence of a clear PL polarization decay within our time resolution suggests that the initially injected polarization dominates the steady state PL polarization. The observed decrease of the initial polarization with increasing pump photon energy hints at a possible ultrafast intervalley relaxation beyond the experimental ps time resolution. By compensating the temperature induced change in bandgap energy with the excitation laser energy an emission polarization of 40% is recovered at 300K, close to the maximum emission polarization for this sample at 4K.
  • We study by Raman scattering the shear and layer breathing modes in multilayer MoS2. These are identified by polarization measurements and symmetry analysis. Their positions change with the number of layers, with different scaling for odd and even layers. A chain model explains the results, with general applicability to any layered material, and allows one to monitor their thickness.
  • We report polarization resolved photoluminescence from monolayer MoS2, a two-dimensional, non-centrosymmetric crystal with direct energy gaps at two different valleys in momentum space. The inherent chiral optical selectivity allows exciting one of these valleys and close to 90% polarized emission at 4K is observed with 40% polarization remaining at 300K. The high polarization degree of the emission remains unchanged in transverse magnetic fields up to 9T indicating robust, selective valley excitation.
  • We uncover the interlayer shear mode of multi-layer graphene samples, ranging from bilayer-graphene (BLG) to bulk graphite, and show that the corresponding Raman peak measures the interlayer coupling. This peak scales from~43cm-1 in bulk graphite to~31cm-1 in BLG. Its low energy makes it a probe of near-Dirac point quasi-particles, with a Breit-Wigner-Fano lineshape due to resonance with electronic transitions. Similar shear modes are expected in all layered materials, providing a direct probe of interlayer interactions
  • We use anhydrous ferric chloride (FeCl3) to intercalate graphite flakes consisting of 2 to 4 graphene layers and to dope graphene monolayers. The intercalant, staging, stability and doping of the resulting intercalation compounds (ICs) are characterized by Raman scattering. The G peak of monolayer graphene heavily-doped by FeCl3 upshifts to~1627cm-1. 2-4 layer ICs have similar upshifts, and a Lorentzian lineshape for the 2D band, indicating that each layer behaves as a decoupled heavily doped monolayer. By performing Raman measurement at different excitation energies we show that, for a given doping level, the 2D peak can be suppressed by Pauli blocking for laser energy below the doping level. Thus, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy allows a direct evaluation of the Fermi level, complementary to that derived by Raman measurements at excitation energies higher than the doping level. We estimate a Fermi level shift of~0.9eV. These ICs are ideal test-beds for the physical and chemical properties of heavily-doped graphenes.
  • Temperature and carrier density dependent spin dynamics for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs) with different structural symmetry has been studied by using time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. The spin relaxation time is measured to be much longer for the symmetrically-designed GaAs quantum well comparing with the asymmetrical one, indicating the strong influence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on spin relaxation. D'yakonov-Perel' (DP) mechanism has been revealed to be the dominant contribution for spin relaxation in GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. The spin relaxation time exhibits non-monotonic dependent behavior on both temperature and photo-excited carrier density, revealing the important role of non-monotonic temperature and density dependence of electron-electron Coulomb scattering. Our experimental observations demonstrate good agreement with recently developed spin relaxation theory based on microscopic kinetic spin Bloch equation approach.
  • Photoluminescence is commonly used to identify the electronic structure of individual nanotubes. But, nanotubes naturally occur in bundles. Thus, we investigate photoluminescence of nanotube bundles. We show that their complex spectra are simply explained by exciton energy transfer between adjacent tubes, whereby excitation of large gap tubes induces emission from smaller gap ones via Forster interaction between excitons. The consequent relaxation rate is faster than non-radiative recombination, leading to enhanced photoluminescence of acceptor tubes. This fingerprints bundles with different compositions and opens opportunities to optimize them for opto-electronics.