• We directly measure twenty overhanging cliffs on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko extracted from the latest shape model and estimate the minimum tensile strengths needed to support them against collapse under the comet's gravity. We find extremely low strengths of around one Pa or less (one to five Pa, when scaled to a metre length). The presence of eroded material at the base of most overhangs, as well as the observed collapse of two features and implied previous collapse of another, suggests that they are prone to failure and that true material strengths are close to these lower limits (although we only consider static stresses and not dynamic stress from, for example, cometary activity). Thus, a tensile strength of a few pascals is a good approximation for the tensile strength of 67P's nucleus material, which is in agreement with previous work. We find no particular trends in overhang properties with size, over the $\sim10-100$ m range studied here, or location on the nucleus. There are no obvious differences, in terms of strength, height or evidence of collapse, between the populations of overhangs on the two cometary lobes, suggesting that 67P is relatively homogenous in terms of tensile strength. Low material strengths are supportive of cometary formation as a primordial rubble pile or by collisional fragmentation of a small (tens of km) body.
  • We simulate the stresses induced by temperature changes in a putative hard layer near the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov--Gerasimenko with a thermo-viscoelastic model. Such a layer could be formed by the recondensation or sintering of water ice (and dust grains), as suggested by laboratory experiments and computer simulations, and would explain the high compressive strength encountered by experiments on board the Philae lander. Changes in temperature from seasonal insolation variation penetrate into the comet's surface to depths controlled by the thermal inertia, causing the material to expand and contract. Modelling this with a Maxwellian viscoelastic response on a spherical nucleus, we show that a hard, icy layer with similar properties to Martian permafrost will experience high stresses: up to tens of MPa, which exceed its material strength (a few MPa), down to depths of centimetres to a metre. The stress distribution with latitude is confirmed qualitatively when taking into account the comet's complex shape but neglecting thermal inertia. Stress is found to be comparable to the material strength everywhere for sufficient thermal inertia ($\gtrsim50$ J m$^{-2}$ K$^{-1}$ s$^{-1/2}$) and ice content ($\gtrsim 45\%$ at the equator). In this case, stresses penetrate to a typical depth of $\sim0.25$ m, consistent with the detection of metre-scale thermal contraction crack polygons all over the comet. Thermal fracturing may be an important erosion process on cometary surfaces which breaks down material and weakens cliffs.
  • The ice giants Uranus and Neptune are the least understood class of planets in our solar system but the most frequently observed type of exoplanets. Presumed to have a small rocky core, a deep interior comprising ~70% heavy elements surrounded by a more dilute outer envelope of H2 and He, Uranus and Neptune are fundamentally different from the better-explored gas giants Jupiter and Saturn. Because of the lack of dedicated exploration missions, our knowledge of the composition and atmospheric processes of these distant worlds is primarily derived from remote sensing from Earth-based observatories and space telescopes. As a result, Uranus's and Neptune's physical and atmospheric properties remain poorly constrained and their roles in the evolution of the Solar System not well understood. Exploration of an ice giant system is therefore a high-priority science objective as these systems (including the magnetosphere, satellites, rings, atmosphere, and interior) challenge our understanding of planetary formation and evolution. Here we describe the main scientific goals to be addressed by a future in situ exploration of an ice giant. An atmospheric entry probe targeting the 10-bar level, about 5 scale heights beneath the tropopause, would yield insight into two broad themes: i) the formation history of the ice giants and, in a broader extent, that of the Solar System, and ii) the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. The probe would descend under parachute to measure composition, structure, and dynamics, with data returned to Earth using a Carrier Relay Spacecraft as a relay station. In addition, possible mission concepts and partnerships are presented, and a strawman ice-giant probe payload is described. An ice-giant atmospheric probe could represent a significant ESA contribution to a future NASA ice-giant flagship mission.
  • The European Far-Infrared (FIR) Space Roadmap focuses on fundamental, yet still unresolved, astrophysical questions that can only be answered through a far-infrared space mission and gives an overview of the technology required to answer them. The document discusses topics ranging from Solar System and Planet Formation, Our Galaxy and nearby Galaxies and Distant Galaxies and Galaxy Evolution. The FIR Roadmap was open to comments from the wider astronomical community following a presentation during EWASS 2016.
  • We aimed to measure the H2O and dust production rates in C/2006 W3 (Christensen) with the Herschel Space Observatory at a heliocentric distance of ~ 5 AU. We have searched for emission in the H2O and NH3 ground-state rotational transitions at 557 GHz and 572 GHz, simultaneously, with HIFI onboard Herschel on UT 1.5 September 2010. Photometric observations of the dust coma in the 70 and 160 {\mu}m channels were acquired with the PACS instrument on UT 26.5 August 2010. A tentative 4-{\sigma} H2O line emission feature was found in the spectra obtained with the HIFI wide-band and high-resolution spectrometers, from which we derive a water production rate of $2.0(5) \times 10^{27}$ molec. s$^{-1}$. A 3-{\sigma} upper limit for the ammonia production rate of <$1.5 \times 10^{27}$ molec. s$^{-1}$ is obtained taking into account the contribution from all hyperfine components. The blueshift of the water line detected by HIFI suggests preferential emission from the subsolar point. However, it is also possible that water sublimation occurs in small ice-bearing grains that are emitted from an active region on the nucleus surface at a speed of ~ 0.2 km s$^{-1}$. The dust thermal emission was detected in the 70 and 160 {\mu}m filters, with a more extended emission in the blue channel. The dust production rates, obtained for a dust size distribution index that explains the fluxes at the photocenters of the PACS images, lie in the range 70-110 kg s$^{-1}$. Scaling the CO production rate measured post-perihelion at 3.20 and 3.32 AU, these values correspond to a dust-to-gas production rate ratio in the range 0.3-0.4. The dust production rates derived in August 2010 are roughly one order of magnitude lower than in September 2009, suggesting that the dust-to-gas production rate ratio remained approximately constant during the period when the activity became increasingly dominated by CO outgassing.
  • HCl and HF are expected to be the main reservoirs of fluorine and chlorine wherever hydrogen is predominantly molecular. They are found to be strongly depleted in dense molecular clouds, suggesting freeze-out onto grains in such cold environments. We can then expect that HCl and HF were also the major carriers of Cl and F in the gas and icy phases of the outer solar nebula, and were incorporated into comets. We aimed to measure the HCl and HF abundances in cometary ices as they can provide insights on the halogen chemistry in the early solar nebula. We searched for the J(1-0) lines of HCl and HF at 626 and 1232 GHz, respectively, using the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. HCl was searched for in comets 103P/Hartley 2 and C/2009 P1 (Garradd), whereas observations of HF were conducted in comet C/2009 P1. In addition, observations of H$_2$O and H$_2^{18}$O lines were performed in C/2009 P1 to measure the H$_2$O production rate. Three lines of CH$_3$OH were serendipitously observed in the HCl receiver setting. HCl is not detected, whereas a marginal (3.6-$\sigma$) detection of HF is obtained. The upper limits for the HCl abundance relative to water are 0.011% and 0.022%, for 103P and C/2009 P1, respectively, showing that HCl is depleted with respect to the solar Cl/O abundance by a factor more than 6$^{+6}_{-3}$ in 103P, where the error is related to the uncertainty in the chlorine solar abundance. The marginal HF detection obtained in C/2009 P1 corresponds to an HF abundance relative to water of (1.8$\pm$0.5) $\times$ 10$^{-4}$, which is approximately consistent with a solar photospheric F/O abundance. The observed depletion of HCl suggests that HCl was not the main reservoir of chlorine in the regions of the solar nebula where these comets formed. HF was possibly the main fluorine compound in the gas phase of the outer solar nebula.
  • Context. Carbon monoxide (CO) has been detected in all Giant Planets and its origin is both internal and external in Jupiter and Neptune. Despite its first detection in Uranus a decade ago, the magnitude of its internal and external sources remains unconstrained. Aims. We targeted CO lines in Uranus in the submillimeter range to constrain its origin. Methods. We recorded disk-averaged spectra of Uranus with a very high spectral resolution at the frequencies of CO rotational lines in the submillimeter range in 2011-2012. We used empirical and diffusion models of the atmosphere of Uranus to constrain the origin of CO. We also used a thermochemical model of its troposphere to derive an upper limit on the O/H ratio in the deep atmosphere of Uranus. Results. We have detected the CO(8-7) rotational line for the first time, with Herschel-HIFI. Both empirical and diffusion model results show that CO has an external origin. An empirical profile in which CO is constant above the 100mbar level with a mole fraction of 7.1-9.0E-9 (depending on the adopted stratospheric thermal structure) reproduces the data. Sporadic and steady source models cannot be differentiated with our data. Taking Teanby & Irwin's internal source model upper limit of a mole fraction of 2.1E-9 [Teanby & Irwin 2013. ApJ, 775, L49], the deep O/H ratio of Uranus is lower than 500 times solar according to our thermochemical computations. Conclusions. Our work shows that the average mole fraction of CO decreases from the stratosphere to the troposphere and thus strongly advocates for an external source of CO in Uranus. Photochemical modeling of oxygen species in the atmosphere of Uranus and more sensitive observations are needed to reveal the nature of the external source.
  • The line emission in the coma was measured in the comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), that were observed on five consecutive nights, 7-11 May 2004, at heliocentric distances of 1.0 and 0.7 AU, respectively, by means of high-resolution spectroscopy using the 10-m Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We present a search for six parent- and product-volatile species (HCN, H2CO, CO, CS, CH3OH, and HNC) in both comets. Multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 5-4 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We derive rotational temperatures of 54(9) K for C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and 119(34) K for C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) that are roughly consistent with observations of other comets at similar distances from the Sun. The gas production rates of material are computed using a spherically symmetric molecular excitation code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons. We find an HCN production rate of 2.96(5)e26 molec.s-1 for comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), corresponding to a mixing ratio with respect to H2O of 1.12(2)e-3. The mean HCN production rate during the observing period is 4.54(10)e26 molec.s-1 for comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), which gives a Q_HCN/Q_H2O mixing ratio of 1.51(3)e-3. With systematically lower mixing ratios in comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), production rate ratios of the observed species with respect to H2O lie within the typical ranges of dynamically new comets in both objects. We find a relative low abundance of CO in C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) compared to the observed range in other comets based on millimeter/submillimeter observations, and a significant upper limit on the CO production in C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) is derived. Depletion of CO suggests partial evaporation from the surface layers during previous visits to the outer Solar System and agrees with previous measurements of dynamically new comets.
  • The "TNOs are Cool!: A survey of the trans-Neptunian region" is a Herschel Open Time Key Program that aims to characterize planetary bodies at the outskirts of the Solar System using PACS and SPIRE data, mostly taken as scan-maps. In this paper we summarize our PACS data reduction scheme that uses a modified version of the standard pipeline for basic data reduction, optimized for faint, moving targets. Due to the low flux density of our targets the observations are confusion noise limited or at least often affected by bright nearby background sources at 100 and 160\,$\mu$m. To overcome these problems we developed techniques to characterize and eliminate the background at the positions of our targets and a background matching technique to compensate for pointing errors. We derive a variety of maps as science data products that are used depending on the source flux and background levels and the scientific purpose. Our techniques are also applicable to a wealth of other Herschel solar system photometric observations, e.g. comets and near-Earth asteroids. The principles of our observing strategies and reduction techniques for moving targets will also be applicable for similar surveys of future infrared space projects.
  • We present Herschel observations of water isotopologues in the atmosphere of the Jupiter-family comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova. No HDO emission is detected, with a 3 sigma upper limit of 2.0 10-4 for the D/H ratio. This value is consistent with the earlier Herschel measurement in the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2. The canonical value of 3 10-4 measured pre-Herschel in a sample of Oort-cloud comets can be excluded at a 4.5 sigma level. The observations presented here further confirm that a diversity of D/H ratios exists in the comet population and emphasize the need for additional measurements with future ground-based facilities, such as CCAT, in the post-Herschel era.
  • Herschel-PACS measurements of the rotational R(0) and R(1) HD lines in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune are analyzed in order to derive a D/H ratio with improved precision for both planets. The derivation of the D/H ratio includes also previous measurements of the R(2) line by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The available spectroscopic line information of the three rotational transitions is discussed and applied in the radiative transfer calculations. The best simultaneous fit of all three lines requires only a minor departure from the Spitzer temperature profile of Uranus and a departure limited to 2K from the Voyager temperature profile of Neptune (both around the tropopause). The resulting and remarkably similar D/H ratios for Uranus and Neptune are found to be (4.4$\pm$0.4)$\times10^{-5}$ and (4.1$\pm$0.4)$\times10^{-5}$ respectively. Although the deuterium enrichment in both atmospheres compared to the protosolar value is confirmed, it is found to be lower compared to previous analysis. Using the interior models of Podolak et al. (1995), Helled et al. (2011) and Nettelmann et al. (2013), and assuming that complete mixing of the atmosphere and interior occured during the planets history, we derive a D/H in protoplanetary ices between (5.75--7.0)$\times10^{-5}$ for Uranus and between (5.1--7.7)$\times10^{-5}$ for Neptune. Conversely, adopting a cometary D/H for the protoplanetary ices between (15-30)$\times10^{-5}$, we constrain the interior models of both planets to have an ice mass fraction of 14-32%, i.e. that the two planets are rock-dominated.
  • 176P/LINEAR is a member of the new cometary class known as main-belt comets (MBCs). It displayed cometary activity shortly during its 2005 perihelion passage that may be driven by the sublimation of sub-surface ices. We have therefore searched for emission of the H2O 110-101 ground state rotational line at 557 GHz toward 176P/LINEAR with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory on UT 8.78 August 2011, about 40 days after its most recent perihelion passage, when the object was at a heliocentric distance of 2.58 AU. No H2O line emission was detected in our observations, from which we derive sensitive 3-sigma upper limits for the water production rate and column density of < 4e25 molec/s and of < 3e10 cm^{-2}, respectively. From the peak brightness measured during the object's active period in 2005, this upper limit is lower than predicted by the relation between production rates and visual magnitudes observed for a sample of comets by Jorda et al. (2008) at this heliocentric distance. Thus, 176P/LINEAR was likely less active at the time of our observation than during its previous perihelion passage. The retrieved upper limit is lower than most values derived for the H2O production rate from the spectroscopic search for CN emission in MBCs.
  • We aim to determine the production rates of several parent and product volatiles and the 12C/13C isotopic carbon ratio in the long-period comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), which is likely to originate from the Oort Cloud. The line emission from several molecules in the coma was measured with high signal-to-noise ratio in January 2005 at heliocentric distance of 1.2 AU by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We have obtained production rates of several volatiles (CH3OH, HCN, H13CN, HNC, H2CO, CO and CS) by comparing the observed and simulated line-integrated intensities. Furthermore, multiline observations of the CH3OH (7-6) series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We find that the CH3OH population distribution of the levels sampled by these lines can be described by a rotational temperature of 40 \pm 3 K. Derived mixing ratios relative to hydrogen cyanide are CO/CH3OH/H2CO/CS/HNC/H13CN/HCN = 30.9/24.6/4.8/0.57/0.031/0.013/1 assuming a pointing offset of 8" due to the uncertain ephemeris at the time of the observations and the telescope pointing error. The measured relative molecular abundances in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) are between low- to typical values of those obtained in Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that it has visited the inner solar system previously and undergone thermal processing. The HNC/HCN abundance ratio of ~3.1% is comparable to that found in other comets, accounting for the dependence on the heliocentric distance, and could possibly be explained by ion-molecule chemical processes in the low-temperature atmosphere. From a tentative H13CN detection, the measured value of 97 \pm 30 for the H12CN/H13CN isotopologue pair is consistent with a telluric value.
  • The D/H ratio in cometary water is believed to be an important indicator of the conditions under which icy planetesimals formed and can provide clues to the contribution of comets to the delivery of water and other volatiles to Earth. Available measurements suggest that there is isotopic diversity in the comet population. The Herschel Space Observatory revealed an ocean-like ratio in the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2, whereas most values measured in Oort-cloud comets are twice as high as the ocean D/H ratio. We present here a new measurement of the D/H ratio in the water of an Oort-cloud comet. HDO, H_2O, and H_2^18O lines were observed with high signal-to-noise ratio in comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) using the Herschel HIFI instrument. Spectral maps of two water lines were obtained to constrain the water excitation. The D/H ratio derived from the measured H_2^16O and HDO production rates is 2.06+/-0.22 X 10**-4. This result shows that the D/H in the water of Oort-cloud comets is not as high as previously thought, at least for a fraction of the population, hence the paradigm of a single, archetypal D/H ratio for all Oort-cloud comets is no longer tenable. Nevertheless, the value measured in C/2009 P1 (Garradd) is significantly higher than the Earth's ocean value of 1.558 X 10**-4. The measured H_2^16O/H_2^18O ratio of 523+/-32 is, however, consistent with the terrestrial value.
  • Methods: We used the dual-band receiver GREAT on board the SOFIA airborne telescope to perform observations of the [C II] 158 {\mu}m fine-structure line at the postitions of two giant molecular clouds (GMC) in the center of IC 342 (GMCs C and E) and compared the spectra with corresponding ground-based data for low- and mid-J CO and [C I]. We performed model calculations assuming a clumpy photo-dissociation region (PDR) environment using the KOSMA-tau PDR model code to derive physical parameters of the local medium. Results: The [C II] 158 {\mu}m emission resembles the spectral signature of ground-based atomic and molecular lines, which indicates a common origin. The emission from GMC E can be decomposed into a cool, molecular component with weak far-ultraviolet (FUV) fields and low, mean densities of 103 cm^-3 and a strongly excited starburst/PDR region with higher densities of 104 cm^-3 and FUV intensities of 250-300 Draine fields. The emission from GMC C is consistent with gas densities of 5000 cm^-3, FUV intensities of a few Draine fields and total gas masses of 20\times10^6 M$_\odot$. Conclusions: The high spectral resolution of the GREAT receiver allowed us to decompose the [C II] emission of the GMC E into a strongly excited gas component resembling a PDR/starburst environment and a quieter, less excited gas component and to analyze the different components within a single beam individually.
  • Trans-Neptunian objects (TNO) represent the leftovers of the formation of the Solar System. Their physical properties provide constraints to the models of formation and evolution of the various dynamical classes of objects in the outer Solar System. Based on a sample of 19 classical TNOs we determine radiometric sizes, geometric albedos and beaming parameters. Our sample is composed of both dynamically hot and cold classicals. We study the correlations of diameter and albedo of these two subsamples with each other and with orbital parameters, spectral slopes and colors. We have done three-band photometric observations with Herschel/PACS and we use a consistent method for data reduction and aperture photometry of this sample to obtain monochromatic flux densities at 70.0, 100.0 and 160.0 \mu m. Additionally, we use Spitzer/MIPS flux densities at 23.68 and 71.42 \mu m when available, and we present new Spitzer flux densities of eight targets. We derive diameters and albedos with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM). As auxiliary data we use reexamined absolute visual magnitudes from the literature and data bases, part of which have been obtained by ground based programs in support of our Herschel key program. We have determined for the first time radiometric sizes and albedos of eight classical TNOs, and refined previous size and albedo estimates or limits of 11 other classicals. The new size estimates of 2002 MS4 and 120347 Salacia indicate that they are among the 10 largest TNOs known. Our new results confirm the recent findings that there are very diverse albedos among the classical TNOs and that cold classicals possess a high average albedo (0.17 +/- 0.04). Diameters of classical TNOs strongly correlate with orbital inclination in our sample. We also determine the bulk densities of six binary TNOs.
  • The hydroxyl radical (OH) is found in various environments within the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Milky Way and external galaxies, mostly either in diffuse interstellar clouds or in the warm, dense environments of newly formed low-mass and high-mass stars, i.e, in the dense shells of compact and ultracompact HII regions (UCHIIRs). Until today, most studies of interstellar OH involved the molecule's radio wavelength hyperfine structure (hfs) transitions. These lines are generally not in LTE and either masing or over-cooling complicates their interpretation. In the past, observations of transitions between different rotational levels of OH, which are at far-infrared wavelengths, have suffered from limited spectral and angular resolution. Since these lines have critical densities many orders of magnitude higher than the radio wavelength ground state hfs lines and are emitted from levels with more than 100 K above the ground state, when observed in emission, they probe very dense and warm material. We probe the warm and dense molecular material surrounding the UCHIIR/OH maser sources W3(OH), G10.62-0.39 and NGC 7538 IRS1 by studying the $^2\Pi_{{1/2}}, J = {3/2} - {1/2}$ rotational transition of OH in emission and, toward the last source also the molecule's $^2\Pi_{3/2}, J = 5/2 - 3/2$ ground-state transition in absorption. We used the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) to observe these OH lines, which are near 1.84 THz ($163 \mu$m) and 2.51 THz ($119.3 \mu$m). We clearly detect the OH lines, some of which are blended with each other. Employing non-LTE radiative transfer calculations we predict line intensities using models of a low OH abundance envelope versus a compact, high-abundance source corresponding to the origin of the radio OH lines.
  • We describe the design and construction of GREAT, the German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies operated on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). GREAT is a modular dual-color heterodyne instrument for highresolution far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. Selected for SOFIA's Early Science demonstration, the instrument has successfully performed three Short and more than a dozen Basic Science flights since first light was recorded on its April 1, 2011 commissioning flight. We report on the in-flight performance and operation of the receiver that - in various flight configurations, with three different detector channels - observed in several science-defined frequency windows between 1.25 and 2.5 THz. The receiver optics was verified to be diffraction-limited as designed, with nominal efficiencies; receiver sensitivities are state-of-the-art, with excellent system stability. The modular design allows for the continuous integration of latest technologies; we briefly discuss additional channels under development and ongoing improvements for Cycle 1 observations. GREAT is a principal investigator instrument, developed by a consortium of four German research institutes, available to the SOFIA users on a collaborative basis.
  • Context. Observing supernova remnants (SNRs) and modelling the shocks they are associated with is the best way to quantify the energy SNRs re-distribute back into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Aims. We present comparisons of shock models with CO observations in the F knot of the W28 supernova remnant. These comparisons constitute a valuable tool to constrain both the shock characteristics and pre-shock conditions. Methods. New CO observations from the shocked regions with the APEX and SOFIA telescopes are presented and combined. The integrated intensities are compared to the outputs of a grid of models, which were combined from an MHD shock code that calculates the dynamical and chemical structure of these regions, and a radiative transfer module based on the 'large velocity gradient' (LVG) approximation. Results. We base our modelling method on the higher J CO transitions, which unambiguously trace the passage of a shock wave. We provide fits for the blue- and red-lobe components of the observed shocks. We find that only stationary, C-type shock models can reproduce the observed levels of CO emission. Our best models are found for a pre-shock density of 104 cm-3, with the magnetic field strength varying between 45 and 100 {\mu}G, and a higher shock velocity for the so-called blue shock (\sim25 km s-1) than for the red one (\sim20 km s-1). Our models also satisfactorily account for the pure rotational H2 emission that is observed with Spitzer.
  • We present Herschel PACS photometry of 18 Plutinos and determine sizes and albedos for these objects using thermal modeling. We analyze our results for correlations, draw conclusions on the Plutino size distribution, and compare to earlier results. Flux densities are derived from PACS mini scan-maps using specialized data reduction and photometry methods. In order to improve the quality of our results, we combine our PACS data with existing Spitzer MIPS data where possible, and refine existing absolute magnitudes for the targets. The physical characterization of our sample is done using a thermal model. Uncertainties of the physical parameters are derived using customized Monte Carlo methods. The correlation analysis is performed using a bootstrap Spearman rank analysis. We find the sizes of our Plutinos to range from 150 to 730 km and geometric albedos to vary between 0.04 and 0.28. The average albedo of the sample is 0.08 \pm 0.03, which is comparable to the mean albedo of Centaurs, Jupiter Family comets and other Trans-Neptunian Objects. We were able to calibrate the Plutino size scale for the first time and find the cumulative Plutino size distribution to be best fit using a cumulative power law with q = 2 at sizes ranging from 120-400 km and q = 3 at larger sizes. We revise the bulk density of 1999 TC36 and find a density of 0.64 (+0.15/-0.11) g cm-3. On the basis of a modified Spearman rank analysis technique our Plutino sample appears to be biased with respect to object size but unbiased with respect to albedo. Furthermore, we find biases based on geometrical aspects and color in our sample. There is qualitative evidence that icy Plutinos have higher albedos than the average of the sample.
  • Physical characterization of Trans-Neptunian objects, a primitive population of the outer solar system, may provide constraints on their formation and evolution. The goal of this work is to characterize a set of 15 scattered disk (SDOs) and detached objects, in terms of their size, albedo, and thermal properties. Thermal flux measurements obtained with the Herschel-PACS instrument at 70, 100 and 160 \mu m, and whenever applicable, with Spitzer-MIPS at 24 and 70 \mu m, are modeled with radiometric techniques, in order to derive the objects' individual size, albedo and when possible beaming factor. Error bars are obtained from a Monte-Carlo approach. We look for correlations between these and other physical and orbital parameters. Diameters obtained for our sample range from 100 to 2400 km, and the geometric albedos (in V band) vary from 3.8 % to 84.5 %. The unweighted mean V geometric albedo for the whole sample is 11.2 % (excluding Eris); 6.9 % for the SDOs, and 17.0 % for the detached objects (excluding Eris). We obtain new bulk densities for three binary systems: Ceto/Phorcys, Typhon/Echidna and Eris/Dysnomia. Apart from correlations clearly due to observational bias, we find significant correlations between albedo and diameter (more reflective objects being bigger), and between albedo, diameter and perihelion distance (brighter and bigger objects having larger perihelia). We discuss possible explanations for these correlations.
  • The Jupiter-family comet 10P/Tempel 2 was observed during its 2010 return with the Herschel Space Observatory. We present here the observation of the (J, K) = (1, 0)-(0, 0) transition of ammonia at 572 GHz in this comet with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) of Herschel. We also report on radio observations of other molecules (HCN, CH3OH, H2S and CS) obtained during the 1999 return of the comet with the CSO telescope and the JCMT, and during its 2010 return with the IRAM 30-m telescope. Molecular abundances relative to water are 0.09%, 1.8%, 0.4%, and 0.08% for HCN, CH3OH, H2S, and CS, respectively. An abundance of 0.5% for NH3 is obtained, which is similar to the values measured in other comets. The hyperfine structure of the ammonia line is resolved for the first time in an astronomical source. Strong anisotropy in the outgassing is present in all observations from 1999 to 2010 and is modelled to derive the production rates.
  • We present Herschel observations of the water molecule in the massive star-forming region W3 IRS5. The o-H17O 110-101, p-H18O 111-000, p-H2O 22 202-111, p-H2O 111-000, o-H2O 221-212, and o-H2O 212-101 lines, covering a frequency range from 552 up to 1669 GHz, have been detected at high spectral resolution with HIFI. The water lines in W3 IRS5 show well-defined high-velocity wings that indicate a clear contribution by outflows. Moreover, the systematically blue-shifted absorption in the H2O lines suggests expansion, presumably driven by the outflow. No infall signatures are detected. The p-H2O 111-000 and o-H2O 212-101 lines show absorption from the cold material (T ~ 10 K) in which the high-mass protostellar envelope is embedded. One-dimensional radiative transfer models are used to estimate water abundances and to further study the kinematics of the region. We show that the emission in the rare isotopologues comes directly from the inner parts of the envelope (T > 100 K) where water ices in the dust mantles evaporate and the gas-phase abundance increases. The resulting jump in the water abundance (with a constant inner abundance of 10^{-4}) is needed to reproduce the o-H17O 110-101 and p-H18O 111-000 spectra in our models. We estimate water abundances of 10^{-8} to 10^{-9} in the outer parts of the envelope (T < 100 K). The possibility of two protostellar objects contributing to the emission is discussed.
  • We report observations of the reactive molecular ions OH$^+$, H$_2$O$^+$, and H$_3$O$^+$ towards Orion KL with Herschel/HIFI. All three $N=1-0$ fine-structure transitions of OH$^+$ at 909, 971, and 1033GHz and both fine-structure components of the doublet {\it ortho}-H$_2$O$^+$ $1_{11}-0_{00}$ transition at 1115 and 1139GHz were detected; an upper limit was obtained for H$_3$O$^+$. OH$^+$ and H$_2$O$^+$ are observed purely in absorption, showing a narrow component at the source velocity of 9 kms$^{-1}$, and a broad blueshifted absorption similar to that reported recently for HF and {\it para}-H$_{2}^{18}$O, and attributed to the low velocity outflow of Orion KL. We estimate column densities of OH$^+$ and H$_2$O$^+$ for the 9 km s$^{-1}$ component of $9 \pm 3 \times 10^{12}$cm$^{-2}$ and $7 \pm 2 \times 10^{12}$cm$^{-2}$, and those in the outflow of $1.9 \pm 0.7 \times 10^{13}$cm$^{-2}$ and $1.0 \pm 0.3 \times 10^{13}$cm$^{-2}$. Upper limits of $2.4\times 10^{12}$cm$^{-2}$ and $8.7\times 10^{12}$cm$^{-2}$ were derived for the column densities of {\it ortho} and {\it para}-H$_3$O$^+$ from transitions near 985 and 1657GHz. The column densities of the three ions are up to an order of magnitude lower than those obtained from recent observations of W31C and W49N. The comparatively low column densities may be explained by a higher gas density despite the assumption of a very high ionization rate.
  • We investigate the physics and chemistry of the gas and dust in dense photon-dominated regions (PDRs), along with their dependence on the illuminating UV field. Using Herschel-HIFI observations, we study the gas energetics in NGC 7023 in relation to the morphology of this nebula. NGC 7023 is the prototype of a PDR illuminated by a B2V star and is one of the key targets of Herschel. Our approach consists in determining the energetics of the region by combining the information carried by the mid-IR spectrum (extinction by classical grains, emission from very small dust particles) with that of the main gas coolant lines. In this letter, we discuss more specifically the intensity and line profile of the 158 micron (1901 GHz) [CII] line measured by HIFI and provide information on the emitting gas. We show that both the [CII] emission and the mid-IR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) arise from the regions located in the transition zone between atomic and molecular gas. Using the Meudon PDR code and a simple transfer model, we find good agreement between the calculated and observed [CII] intensities. HIFI observations of NGC 7023 provide the opportunity to constrain the energetics at the surface of PDRs. Future work will include analysis of the main coolant line [OI] and use of a new PDR model that includes PAH-related species.