• Van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are an emergent class of metamaterials comprised of vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) building blocks, which provide us with a vast tool set to engineer their properties on top of the already rich tunability of 2D materials. One of the knobs, the twist angle between different layers, plays a crucial role in the ultimate electronic properties of a vdW heterostructure and does not have a direct analog in other systems such as MBE-grown semiconductor heterostructures. For small twist angles, the moir\'e pattern produced by the lattice misorientation creates a long-range modulation. So far, the study of the effect of twist angles in vdW heterostructures has been mostly concentrated in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) twisted structures, which exhibit relatively weak interlayer interaction due to the presence of a large bandgap in h-BN. Here we show that when two graphene sheets are twisted by an angle close to the theoretically predicted 'magic angle', the resulting flat band structure near charge neutrality gives rise to a strongly-correlated electronic system. These flat bands exhibit half-filling insulating phases at zero magnetic field, which we show to be a Mott-like insulator arising from electrons localized in the moir\'e superlattice. These unique properties of magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene (TwBLG) open up a new playground for exotic many-body quantum phases in a 2D platform made of pure carbon and without magnetic field. The easy accessibility of the flat bands, the electrical tunability, and the bandwidth tunability though twist angle may pave the way towards more exotic correlated systems, such as unconventional superconductors or quantum spin liquids.
  • Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a natural hyperbolic material that supports both volume-confined hyperbolic polaritons (HPs) and sidewall-confined hyperbolic surface polaritons (HSPs). In this work, we demonstrate effective excitation, control and steering of HSPs in hBN through engineering the geometry and orientation of hBN sidewalls. By combining infrared (IR) nano-imaging and numerical simulations, we investigate the reflection, transmission and scattering of HSPs at the hBN corners with various apex angles. We show that the sidewall-confined nature of HSPs enables a high degree of control over their propagation by designing the geometry of hBN nanostructures.
  • Twisted bilayer graphene (TwBLG) is one of the simplest van der Waals heterostructures, yet it yields a complex electronic system with intricate interplay between moir\'{e} physics and interlayer hybridization effects. We report on electronic transport measurements of high mobility small angle TwBLG devices showing clear evidence for insulating states at the superlattice band edges, with thermal activation gaps several times larger than theoretically predicted. Moreover, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations and tight binding calculations reveal that the band structure consists of two intersecting Fermi contours whose crossing points are effectively unhybridized. We attribute this to exponentially suppressed interlayer hopping amplitudes for momentum transfers larger than the moir\'{e} wavevector.
  • A quantum Hall edge state provides a rich foundation to study electrons in 1-dimension (1d) but is limited to chiral propagation along a single direction. Here, we demonstrate a versatile platform to realize new 1d systems made by combining quantum Hall edge states of opposite chiralities in a graphene electron-hole bilayer. Using this approach, we engineer helical 1d edge conductors where the counterpropagating modes are localized in separate electron and hole layers by a tunable electric field. These helical conductors exhibit strong nonlocal transport signals and suppressed backscattering due to the opposite spin polarizations of the counterpropagating modes. Moreover, we investigate these electron-hole bilayers in the fractional quantum Hall regime, where we observe conduction through fractional and integer edge states of opposite chiralities, paving the way towards the realization of 1d helical systems with fractional quantum statistics.
  • A magnetic domain boundary on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator is predicted to host a chiral edge state, but direct demonstration is challenging. Here, we used a scanning superconducting quantum interference device to show that current in a magnetized EuS/Bi2Se3 heterostructure flows at the edge when the Fermi level is gate-tuned to the surface band gap. We further induced micron-scale magnetic structures on the heterostructure, and detected a chiral edge current at the magnetic domain boundary. The chirality of the current was determined by magnetization of the surrounding domain and its magnitude by the local chemical potential rather than the applied current. Such magnetic structures, provide a platform for detecting topological magnetoelectric effects and may enable progress in quantum information processing and spintronics.
  • Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a natural hyperbolic material, for which the dielectric constants are the same in the basal plane (epsilon^t = epsilon^x = epsilon^y) but have opposite signs (epsilon^t*epsilon^z < 0) from that in the normal plane (epsilon^z). Due to this property, finite-thickness slabs of h-BN act as multimode waveguides for propagation of hyperbolic phonon polaritons - collective modes that originate from the coupling between photons and electric dipoles in phonons. However, control of these hyperbolic phonon polaritons modes has remained challenging, mostly because their electrodynamic properties are dictated by the crystal lattice of h-BN. Here we show by direct nano-infrared imaging that these hyperbolic polaritons can be effectively modulated in a van der Waals heterostructure composed of monolayer graphene on h-BN. Tunability originates from the hybridization of surface plasmon polaritons in graphene with hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN, so that the eigenmodes of the graphene/h-BN heterostructure are hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons. Remarkably, the hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons in graphene/h-BN suffer little from ohmic losses, making their propagation length 1.5-2.0 times greater than that of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN. The hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons possess the combined virtues of surface plasmon polaritons in graphene and hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN. Therefore, graphene/h-BN structures can be classified as electromagnetic metamaterials since the resulting properties of these devices are not present in its constituent elements alone.
  • Interference of standing waves in electromagnetic resonators forms the basis of many technologies, from telecommunications and spectroscopy to detection of gravitational waves. However, unlike the confinement of light waves in vacuum, the interference of electronic waves in solids is complicated by boundary properties of the crystal, notably leading to electron guiding by atomic-scale potentials at the edges. Understanding the microscopic role of boundaries on coherent wave interference is an unresolved question due to the challenge of detecting charge flow with submicron resolution. Here we employ Fraunhofer interferometry to achieve real-space imaging of cavity modes in a graphene Fabry-Perot resonator, embedded between two superconductors to form a Josephson junction. By directly visualizing current flow using Fourier methods, our measurements reveal surprising redistribution of current on and off resonance. These findings provide direct evidence of separate interference conditions for edge and bulk currents and reveal the ballistic nature of guided edge states. Beyond equilibrium, our measurements show strong modulation of the multiple Andreev reflection amplitude on an off resonance, a direct measure of the gate-tunable change of cavity transparency. These results demonstrate that, contrary to the common belief, electron interactions with realistic disordered edges facilitate electron wave interference and ballistic transport.
  • Uniaxial materials whose axial and tangential permittivities have opposite signs are referred to as indefinite or hyperbolic media. In such materials light propagation is unusual, leading to novel and often non-intuitive optical phenomena. Here we report infrared nano-imaging experiments demonstrating that crystals of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), a natural mid-infrared hyperbolic material, can act as a "hyper-focusing lens" and as a multi-mode waveguide. The lensing is manifested by subdiffractional focusing of phonon-polaritons launched by metallic disks underneath the hBN crystal. The waveguiding is revealed through the modal analysis of the periodic patterns observed around such launchers and near the sample edges. Our work opens new opportunities for anisotropic layered insulators in infrared nanophotonics complementing and potentially surpassing concurrent artificial hyperbolic materials with lower losses and higher optical localization.
  • Photoexcitation of graphene leads to an interesting sequence of phenomena, some of which can be exploited in optoelectronic devices based on graphene. In particular, the efficient and ultrafast generation of an electron distribution with an elevated electron temperature and the concomitant generation of a photo-thermoelectric voltage at symmetry-breaking interfaces is of interest for photosensing and light harvesting. Here, we experimentally study the generated photocurrent at the graphene-metal interface, focusing on the time-resolved photocurrent, the effects of photon energy, Fermi energy and light polarization. We show that a single framework based on photo-thermoelectric photocurrent generation explains all experimental results.
  • Controlling the energy flow processes and the associated energy relaxation rates of a light emitter is of high fundamental interest, and has many applications in the fields of quantum optics, photovoltaics, photodetection, biosensing and light emission. While advanced dielectric and metallic systems have been developed to tailor the interaction between an emitter and its environment, active control of the energy flow has remained challenging. Here, we demonstrate in-situ electrical control of the relaxation pathways of excited erbium ions, which emit light at the technologically relevant telecommunication wavelength of 1.5 $\mu$m. By placing the erbium at a few nanometres distance from graphene, we modify the relaxation rate by more than a factor of three, and control whether the emitter decays into either electron-hole pairs, emitted photons or graphene near-infrared plasmons, confined to $<$15 nm to the sheet. These capabilities to dictate optical energy transfer processes through electrical control of the local density of optical states constitute a new paradigm for active (quantum) photonics.
  • The unique electronic properties of the surface electrons in a topological insulator are protected by time-reversal symmetry. Circularly polarized light naturally breaks time-reversal symmetry, which may lead to an exotic surface quantum Hall state. Using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we show that an intense ultrashort mid-infrared pulse with energy below the bulk band gap hybridizes with the surface Dirac fermions of a topological insulator to form Floquet-Bloch bands. These photon dressed surface bands exhibit polarization-dependent band gaps at avoided crossings. Circularly polarized photons induce an additional gap at the Dirac point, which is a signature of broken time-reversal symmetry on the surface. These observations establish the Floquet-Bloch bands in solids and pave the way for optical manipulation of topological quantum states of matter.
  • Low-dimensional electronic systems have traditionally been obtained by electrostatically confining electrons, either in heterostructures or in intrinsically nanoscale materials such as single molecules, nanowires, and graphene. Recently, a new paradigm has emerged with the advent of symmetry-protected surface states on the boundary of topological insulators, enabling the creation of electronic systems with novel properties. For example, time reversal symmetry (TRS) endows the massless charge carriers on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator with helicity, locking the orientation of their spin relative to their momentum. Weakly breaking this symmetry generates a gap on the surface, resulting in charge carriers with finite effective mass and exotic spin textures. Analogous manipulations of the one-dimensional boundary states of a two-dimensional topological insulator are also possible, but have yet to be observed in the leading candidate materials. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that charge neutral monolayer graphene displays a new type of quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, previously thought to exist only in TRS topological insulators, when it is subjected to a very large magnetic field angled with respect to the graphene plane. Unlike in the TRS case, the QSH presented here is protected by a spin-rotation symmetry that emerges as electron spins in a half-filled Landau level are polarized by the large in-plane magnetic field. The properties of the resulting helical edge states can be modulated by balancing the applied field against an intrinsic antiferromagnetic instability, which tends to spontaneously break the spin-rotation symmetry. In the resulting canted antiferromagnetic (CAF) state, we observe transport signatures of gapped edge states, which constitute a new kind of one-dimensional electronic system with tunable band gap and associated spin-texture.
  • When light is absorbed by a semiconductor, photoexcited charge carriers enhance the absorption of far-infrared radiation due to intraband transitions. We observe the opposite behavior in monolayer graphene, a zero-gap semiconductor with linear dispersion. By using time domain terahertz (THz) spectroscopy in conjunction with optical pump excitation, we observe a reduced absorption of THz radiation in photoexcited graphene. The measured spectral shape of the differential optical conductivity exhibits non-Drude behavior. We discuss several possible mechanisms that contribute to the observed low-frequency non-equilibrium optical response of graphene.
  • Van der Waals heterostructures comprise a new class of artificial materials formed by stacking atomically-thin planar crystals. Here, we demonstrate band structure engineering of a van der Waals heterostructure composed of a monolayer graphene flake coupled to a rotationally-aligned hexagonal boron nitride substrate. The spatially-varying interlayer atomic registry results both in a local breaking of the carbon sublattice symmetry and a long-range moir\'e superlattice potential in the graphene. This interplay between short- and long-wavelength effects results in a band structure described by isolated superlattice minibands and an unexpectedly large band gap at charge neutrality, both of which can be tuned by varying the interlayer alignment. Magnetocapacitance measurements reveal previously unobserved fractional quantum Hall states reflecting the massive Dirac dispersion that results from broken sublattice symmetry. At ultra-high fields, integer conductance plateaus are observed at non-integer filling factors due to the emergence of the Hofstadter butterfly in a symmetry-broken Landau level.
  • The advent of few-layer graphenes has given rise to a new family of two-dimensional systems with emergent electronic properties governed by relativistic quantum mechanics. The multiple carbon sublattices endow the electronic wavefunctions with pseudospin, a lattice analog of the relativistic electron spin, while the multilayer structure leads to electric field effect tunable electronic bands. Here we use these properties to realize giant conductance oscillations in ballistic trilayer graphene Fabry-Perot interferometers, which result from phase coherent transport through resonant bound states beneath an electrostatic barrier. We cloak these states by selectively decoupling them from the leads, resulting in transport via non-resonant states and suppression of the giant oscillations. Cloaking is achieved both classically, by manipulating quasiparticle momenta with a magnetic field, and quantum mechanically, by locally varying the pseudospin character of the carrier wavefunctions. Our results illustrate the unique potential of trilayer graphene as a versatile platform for electron optics and pseudospintronics.
  • We perform time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of a prototypical topological insulator Bi$_2$Se$_3$ to study the ultrafast dynamics of surface and bulk electrons after photo-excitation. By analyzing the evolution of surface states and bulk band spectra, we obtain their electronic temperature and chemical potential relaxation dynamics separately. These dynamics reveal strong phonon-assisted surface-bulk coupling at high lattice temperature and total suppression of inelastic scattering between the surface and the bulk at low lattice temperature. In this low temperature regime, the unique cooling of Dirac fermions in TI by acoustic phonons is manifested through a power law dependence of the surface temperature decay rate on carrier density.
  • Three-dimensional topological insulators represent a new quantum phase of matter with spin-polarized surface states that are protected from backscattering. The static electronic properties of these surface states have been comprehensively imaged by both photoemission and tunneling spectroscopies. Theorists have proposed that topological surface states can also exhibit novel electronic responses to light, such as topological quantum phase transitions and spin-polarized electrical currents. However, the effects of optically driving a topological insulator out of equilibrium have remained largely unexplored experimentally, and no photocurrents have been measured. Here we show that illuminating the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with circularly polarized light generates a photocurrent that originates from topological helical Dirac fermions, and that reversing the helicity of the light reverses the direction of the photocurrent. We also observe a photocurrent that is controlled by the linear polarization of light, and argue that it may also have a topological surface state origin. This approach may allow the probing of dynamic properties of topological insulators and lead to novel opto-spintronic devices.
  • We report on the etching of graphene devices with a helium ion beam, including in situ electrical measurement during lithography. The etching process can be used to nanostructure and electrically isolate different regions in a graphene device, as demonstrated by etching a channel in a suspended graphene device with etched gaps down to about 10 nm. Graphene devices on silicon dioxide (SiO2) substrates etch with lower He ion doses and are found to have a residual conductivity after etching, which we attribute to contamination by hydrocarbons.
  • Current-voltage characteristics of suspended single-wall carbon nanotube quantum dots show a series of steps equally spaced in voltage. The energy scale of this harmonic, low-energy excitation spectrum is consistent with that of the longitudinal low-k phonon mode (stretching mode) in the nanotube. Agreement is found with a Franck-Condon-based model in which the phonon-assisted tunneling process is modeled as a coupling of electronic levels to underdamped quantum harmonic oscillators. Comparison with this model indicates a rather strong electron-phonon coupling factor of order unity.
  • We have studied the discrete electronic spectrum of closed metallic nanotube quantum dots. At low temperatures, the stability diagrams show a very regular four-fold pattern that allows for the determination of the electron addition and excitation energies. The measured nanotube spectra are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on the nanotube band structure. Our results permit the complete identification of the electron quantum states in nanotube quantum dots.
  • We report magnetic field spectroscopy measurements in carbon nanotube quantum dots exhibiting four-fold shell structure in the energy level spectrum. The magnetic field induces a large splitting between the two orbital states of each shell, demonstrating their opposite magnetic moment and determining transitions in the spin and orbital configuration of the quantum dot ground state. We use inelastic cotunneling spectroscopy to accurately resolve the spin and orbital contributions to the magnetic moment. A small coupling is found between orbitals with opposite magnetic moment leading to anticrossing behavior at zero field.