• In this work we consider kink-antikink and antikink-kink collisions in a modified $\phi^4$ model with a false vacuum characterized by a dimensionless parameter $\epsilon$. The usual $\phi^4$ model is recovered for $\epsilon=0$. We investigate the $\epsilon<<1$ regime where the kink in the presence of false vacuum can be understood as a small deformation of the standard kink for the $\phi^4$ model. We show that the attractive interaction between the kink-antikink pair leads to a rich scattering pattern, in some cases delaying considerably the false vacuum decay.
  • This work deals with a system of three distinct species that changes in time under the presence of mobility, selection, and reproduction, as in the popular rock-paper-scissors game. The novelty of the current study is the modification of the mobility rule to the case of directional mobility, in which the species move following the direction associated to a larger (averaged) number density of selection targets in the surrounding neighborhood. Directional mobility can be used to simulate eyes that see or a nose that smells, and we show how it may contribute to reduce the probability of coexistence.
  • In this paper we show that the on-shell Lagrangian of a perfect fluid depends on microscopic properties of the fluid, giving specific examples of perfect fluids with different on-shell Lagrangians but with the same energy-momentum tensor. We demonstrate that if the fluid is constituted by localized concentrations of energy with fixed rest mass and structure (solitons) then the average on-shell Lagrangian of a perfect fluid is given by ${\mathcal L}_m=T$, where $T$ is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We show that our results have profound implications for theories of gravity where the matter Lagrangian appears explicitly in the equations of motion of the gravitational and matter fields, potentially leading to observable deviations from a nearly perfect cosmic microwave background black body spectrum: $n$-type spectral distortions, affecting the normalization of the spectral energy density. Finally, we put stringent constraints on $f(R,{\mathcal L}_m)$ theories of gravity using the COBE-FIRAS measurement of the spectral radiance of the cosmic microwave background.
  • We consider a model where particles are described as localized concentrations of energy, with fixed rest mass and structure, which are not significantly affected by their self-induced gravitational field. We show that the volume average of the on-shell matter Lagrangian ${\mathcal L_m}$ describing such particles, in the proper frame, is equal to the volume average of the trace $T$ of the energy-momentum tensor in the same frame, independently of the particle's structure and constitution. Since both ${\mathcal L_m}$ and $T$ are scalars, and thus independent of the reference frame, this result is also applicable to collections of moving particles and, in particular, to those which can be described by a perfect fluid. Our results are expected to be particularly relevant in the case of modified theories of gravity with nonminimal coupling to matter where the matter Lagrangian appears explicitly in the equations of motion of the gravitational and matter fields, such as $f(R,{\mathcal L_m})$ and $f(R,T)$ gravity. In particular, they indicate that, in this context, $f(R,{\mathcal L_m})$ theories may be regarded as a subclass of $f(R,T)$ gravity.
  • We consider a model with two real scalar fields which admits phantom domain wall solutions. We investigate the structure and evolution of these phantom domain walls in an expanding homogeneous and isotropic universe. In particular, we show that the increase of the tension of the domain walls with cosmic time, associated to the evolution of the phantom scalar field, is responsible for an additional damping term in their equations of motion. We describe the macroscopic dynamics of phantom domain walls, showing that extended phantom defects whose tension varies on a cosmological timescale cannot be the dark energy.
  • In this work we give specific examples of competition models, with six and eight species, whose three-dimensional dynamics naturally leads to the formation of string networks with junctions, associated with regions that have a high concentration of enemy species. We study the two- and three-dimensional evolution of such networks, both using stochastic network and mean field theory simulations. If the predation, reproduction and mobility probabilities do not vary in space and time, we find that the networks attain scaling regimes with a characteristic length roughly proportional to $t^{1/2}$, where $t$ is the physical time, thus showing that the presence of junctions, on its own, does not have a significant impact on their scaling properties.
  • A unification of dark matter and dark energy in terms of a logotropic perfect dark fluid has recently been proposed, where deviations with respect to the standard $\Lambda {\rm CDM}$ model are dependent on a single parameter $B$. In this paper we show that the requirement that the linear growth of cosmic structures on comoving scales larger than $8 h^{-1} \, {\rm Mpc}$ is not significantly affected with respect to the standard $\Lambda {\rm CDM}$ result provides the strongest constraint to date on the model ($B <6 \times 10^{-7}$), an improvement of more than three orders of magnitude over previous constraints on the value of $B$. We further show that this constraint rules out the logotropic Unified Dark Energy model as a possible solution to the small scale problems of the $\Lambda$CDM model, including the cusp problem of Dark Matter halos or the missing satellite problem, as well as the original version of the model where the Planck energy density was taken as one of the two parameters characterizing the logotropic dark fluid.
  • Quasi-periodic modulations of the stellar light curve may result from dark spots crossing the visible stellar disc. Due to differential rotation, spots at different latitudes generally have different rotation periods. Hence, by studying spot-induced modulations, one can learn about stellar surface (differential) rotation and magnetic activity. Recently, Reinhold & Arlt (2015) proposed a method based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram of light curves to identify the sign of the differential rotation at the stellar surface. Our goal is to understand how the modulation of the stellar light curve due to the presence of spots and the corresponding periodogram are affected by both the stellar and spot properties. We generate synthetic light curves of stars with different properties (inclination angle, limb darkening, and rotation rate) and spot configurations (number of spots, latitude, intensity contrast, and size). By analysing their Lomb-Scargle periodograms, we compute the ratio between the heights of the second and first harmonics of the rotation period (peak-height-ratio). We find that the peak-height ratios are essentially a function of a single parameter, the fraction of time the spot is visible, which is related to the sinusoidality of the spot modulation. We identify the conditions under which the periodogram analysis can actually provide an estimate of the spot latitudes and/or the stellar inclination angle. We also identify possible sources of error in the identification of the sign of the differential rotation.
  • Starspots are cooler and darker than the stellar surface. Therefore, the emitted flux of a star changes when spots are visible on its surface. The presence of spots together with the stellar rotation leads to a periodic modulation on the light curve. By studying that modulation one can then learn about the stellar rotation and also magnetic activity. Recently, Reinhold & Arlt (2015) proposed a method based on the analysis of the Lomb Scargle periodogram of the light curve to identify the sign of the differential rotation, i.e. whether the equator rotates faster than the poles or the opposite. We have been studying in detail the spots' impact on the light curve and on the resulting periodogram. We find that, under some conditions, the periodogram can actually provide an estimate of the true spot latitudes and/or the stellar inclination angle. Moreover, we find that the impact of the spot on the ratio between the heights of the second and first harmonics of the main peaks in the periodogram can be described by a single parameter, the visibility time of the spot. Finally, we also identify possible sources of false positives/negatives for the sign of the differential rotation.
  • The activity-related variations in the solar acoustic frequencies have been known for 30 years. However, the importance of the different contributions is still not well established. With this in mind, we developed an empirical model to estimate the spot-induced frequency shifts, which takes into account the sunspot properties, such as area and latitude. The comparison between the model frequency shifts obtained from the daily sunspot records and those observed suggests that the contribution from a stochastic component to the total frequency shifts is about 30%. The remaining 70% is related to a global, long-term variation. We also propose a new observable to investigate the short- and mid-term variations of the frequency shifts, which is insensitive to the long-term variations contained in the data. On the shortest time scales the variations in the frequency shifts are strongly correlated with the variations in the total area covered by sunspots. However, a significant loss of correlation is still found, which cannot be fully explained by ignoring the invisible side of the Sun when accounting for the total sunspot area. We also verify that the times when the frequency shifts and the sunspot areas do not vary in a similar way tend to coincide with the times of the maximum amplitude of the quasi-biennial variations found in the seismic data.
  • The frequencies of the solar acoustic oscillations vary over the activity cycle. The variations in other activity proxies are found to be well correlated with the variations in the acoustic frequencies. However, each proxy has a slightly different time behaviour. Our goal is to characterize the differences between the time behaviour of the frequency shifts and of two other activity proxies, namely, the area covered by sunspots and the 10.7cm flux. We define a new observable that is particularly sensitive to the short-term frequency variations. We then compare the observable when computed from model frequency shifts and from observed frequency shifts obtained with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) for cycle 23. Our analysis shows that on the shortest time-scales the variations in the frequency shifts seen in the GONG observations are strongly correlated with the variations in the area covered by sunspots. However, a significant loss of correlation is still found. We verify that the times when the frequency shifts and the sunspot area do not vary in a similar way tend to coincide with the times of the maxima of the quasi-biennial variations seen in the solar seismic data. A similar analysis of the relation between the 10.7cm flux and the frequency shifts reveals that the short-time variations in the frequency shifts follow even more closely those of the 10.7cm flux than those of the sunspot area. However, a loss of correlation between frequency shifts and 10.7cm flux variations is still found around the same times.
  • Activity-related variations in the solar oscillation properties have been known for 30 years. However, the relative importance of the different contributions to the observed variations is not yet fully understood. Our goal is to estimate the relative contribution from sunspots to the observed activity-related variations in the frequencies of the acoustic modes. We use a variational principle to relate the phase differences induced by sunspots on the acoustic waves to the corresponding changes in the frequencies of the global acoustic oscillations. From the sunspot properties (area and latitude as a function of time), we are able to estimate the spot-induced frequency shifts. These are then combined with a smooth frequency shift component, associated with long-term solar-cycle variations, and the results compared with the frequency shifts derived from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) data. The result of this comparison is consistent with a sunspot contribution to the observed frequency shifts of roughly 30 per cent, with the remaining 70 per cent resulting mostly from a global, non-stochastic variation, possibly related to the changes in the overall magnetic field. Moreover, analysis of the residuals obtained after the subtraction of the model frequency shifts from the observations indicates the presence of a 1.5-yr periodicity in the data in phase with the quasi-biennial variations reported in the literature.
  • We study the inner dynamics of accreting Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld black holes using the homogeneous approximation and taking charge as a surrogate for angular momentum. We show that there is a minimum of the accretion rate below which mass inflation does not occur, and we derive an analytical expression for this threshold as a function of the fundamental scale of the theory, the accretion rate, the mass, and the charge of the black hole. Our result explicitly demonstrates that, no matter how close Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity is to general relativity, there is always a minimum accretion rate below which there is no mass inflation. For larger accretion rates, mass inflation takes place inside the black hole as in general relativity until the extremely rapid density variations bring it to an abrupt end. We derive analytical scaling solutions for the value of the energy density and of the Misner-Sharp mass attained at the end of mass inflation as a function of fundamental scale of the theory, the accretion rate, the mass, and the charge of the black hole, and compare these with the corresponding numerical solutions. We find that, except for unreasonably high accretion rates, our analytical results appear to provide an accurate description of homogeneous mass inflation inside accreting Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld black holes.
  • We critically assess recent claims suggesting that upper limits on the time variation of the fine-structure constant tightly constrain the coupling of a dark energy scalar field to the electromagnetic sector, and, indirectly, the violation of the weak equivalence principle. We show that such constraints depend crucially on the assumed priors, even if the dark energy was described by a dynamical scalar field with a constant equation of state parameter $w$ linearly coupled to the electromagnetic sector through a dimensionless coupling $\zeta$. We find that, although local atomic clock tests, as well as other terrestrial, astrophysical and cosmological data, put stringent bounds on $|\zeta| {\sqrt {|w+1|}}$, the time variation of the fine-structure constant cannot be used to set or to improve upper limits on $|\zeta|$ or $|w+1|$ without specifying priors, consistent but not favoured by current data, which strongly disfavour low values of $|w+1|$ or $|\zeta|$, respectively. We briefly discuss how this might change with a new generation of high-resolution ultra-stable spectrographs, such as ESPRESSO and ELT-HIRES, in combination with forthcoming missions to map the geometry of the Universe, such as Euclid, or to test the equivalence principle, such as MICROSCOPE or STEP.
  • We investigate the interior dynamics of accreting black holes in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity using the homogeneous approximation and taking charge as a surrogate for angular momentum, showing that accretion can have an enormous impact on their inner structure. We find that, unlike in general relativity, there is a minimum accretion rate bellow which the mass inflation instability, which drives the centre-of-mass streaming density to exponentially high values in an extremely short interval of time, does not occur. We further show that, above this threshold, mass inflation takes place inside black holes very much in the same way as in general relativity, but is brought to a halt at a maximum energy density which is, in general, much smaller than the fundamental energy density of the theory. We conjecture that some of these results may be a common feature of modified gravity theories in which significant deviations from general relativity manifest themselves at very high densities.
  • We show that simple thermodynamic conditions determine, to a great extent, the equation of state and dynamics of cosmic defects of arbitrary dimensionality. We use these conditions to provide a more direct derivation of the Velocity-dependent One-Scale (VOS) model for the macroscopic dynamics of topological defects of arbitrary dimensionality in a $N+1$-dimensional homogeneous and isotropic universe. We parameterize the modifications to the VOS model associated to the interaction of the topological defects with other fields, including, in particular, a new dynamical degree of freedom associated to the variation of the mass per unit $p$-area of the defects, and compute the corresponding scaling solutions. The observational impact of this new dynamical degree of freedom is also briefly discussed.
  • The increasing interest in understanding stellar magnetic activity cycles is a strong motivation for the development of parameterized starspot models which can be constrained observationally. In this work we develop an empirical tool for the stochastic reconstruction of sunspot cycles, using the average solar properties as a reference. The synthetic sunspot cycle is compared with the sunspot data extracted from the National Geophysical Data Center, in particular using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. This tool yields synthetic spot group records, including date, area, latitude, longitude, rotation rate of the solar surface at the group's latitude, and an identification number. Comparison of the stochastic reconstructions with the daily sunspot records confirms that our empirical model is able to successfully reproduce the main properties of the solar sunspot cycle. As a by-product of this work, we show that the Gnevyshev-Waldmeier rule, which describes the spots' area-lifetime relation, is not adequate for small groups and we propose an effective correction to that relation which leads to a closer agreement between the synthetic sunspot cycle and the observations.
  • We develop a numerical tool for the fast computation of the temperature and polarization power spectra generated by domain wall networks, by extending the publicly available CMBACT code --- that calculates the CMB signatures generated by active sources --- to also describe domain wall networks. In order to achieve this, we adapt the Unconnected Segment model for cosmic strings to also describe domain wall networks, and use it to model the energy-momentum of domain wall networks throughout their cosmological history. We use this new tool to compute and study the TT, EE, TE and BB power spectra generated by standard domain wall networks, and derive a conservative constraint on the energy scale of the domain wall-forming phase transition of $\upeta <0.92\,\,{\rm MeV}$ (which is a slight improvement over the original Zel'dovich bound of $1\,\,{\rm MeV}$).
  • We consider the possibility that current hints of spatial variations of the fine structure constant at high redshift, based on VLT/UVES and Keck/HIRES observations, could be caused by a biased domain wall network described by a scalar field non-minimally coupled to the electromagnetic field. We show that in order to be responsible for the reported spatial variations of the fine structure constant, the fractional contribution of the domain wall network to the energy density of the Universe should be tightly constrained within the range $10^{-10} < \Omega_{w0} < 10^{-5}$. We also show that the domain wall dynamics should be essentially frictionless, so that its characteristic scale is in the order of the Hubble radius at the present time.
  • We investigate the potential impact of mass inflation inside black holes on the dynamics of the Universe, considering a recent reformulation of general relativity, proposed in [1], which prevents the vacuum energy from acting as a gravitational source. The interior dynamics of accreting black holes is studied, at the classical level, using the homogeneous approximation and taking charge as a surrogate for angular momentum. We show that, depending on the accreting fluid properties, mass inflation inside black holes could influence the value of the cosmological constant and thus the dynamics of the Universe. A full assessment of the cosmological role played by black holes will require a deeper understanding of the extremely energetic regimes expected inside real astrophysical black holes, including their relation with the physics of the very early Universe, and may eventually lead to an entirely new paradigm for the origin and evolution of the Universe.
  • We investigate the impact on the classical dynamics of dark matter particles and dark energy of a non-minimal coupling in the dark sector, assuming that the mass of the dark matter particles is coupled to a dark energy scalar field. We show that standard results can only be recovered if the space-time variation of the dark energy scalar field is sufficiently smooth on the characteristic length scale of the dark matter particles, and we determine the associated constraint dependent on both the mass and radius of the dark matter particles and the coupling to the dark energy scalar field. We further show, using field theory numerical simulations, that a violation of such constraint results in a microscopic feedback effect strongly affecting the dynamics of dark matter particles, with a potential impact on structure formation and on the space-time evolution of the dark energy equation of state.
  • We show that the observed rotation curves of spiral galaxies constrain the sound speed of the dark matter to be $c_s < 10^{-4} c$, where $c$ is the speed of light in vacuum. Using the Modified Chaplygin Gas as a representative example of a class of unified dark energy models incorporating an effective dark matter component with a non-zero sound speed, we determine the most stringent constraint to date on the value of the constant contribution to the equation of state parameter in this class of models. Finally, we explain the reason why previous constraints using the Cosmic Microwave Background and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations were not as competitive as the one presented in this paper and discuss the limitations of the recently proposed Extended Chaplygin Gas.
  • We explicitly compute the dynamics of closed homogeneous and isotropic universes permeated by a single perfect fluid with a constant equation of state parameter $w$ in the context of a recent reformulation of general relativity, proposed in [1], which prevents the vacuum energy from acting as a gravitational source. This is done using an iterative algorithm, taking as an initial guess the background cosmological evolution obtained using standard general relativity in the absence of a cosmological constant. We show that, in general, the impact of the vacuum energy sequestering mechanism on the dynamics of the universe is significant, except for the $w=1/3$ case where the results are identical to those obtained in the context of general relativity with a null cosmological constant. We also show that there are well behaved models in general relativity that do not have a well behaved counterpart in the vacuum energy sequestering paradigm studied in this paper, highlighting the specific case of a quintessence scalar field with a linear potential.
  • We study the nonlinear regime of Unified Dark Energy models, using Generalized Chaplygin Gas cosmologies as a representative example, and introduce a new parameter characterizing the level of small scale clustering in these scenarios. We show that viable Generalized Chaplygin Gas cosmologies, consistent with the most recent observational constraints, may be constructed for any value of the Generalized Chaplygin Gas parameter by considering models with a sufficiently high level of nonlinear clustering.
  • We consider an alternative approach for the computation of the stochastic gravitational wave background generated by small loops produced throughout the cosmological evolution of cosmic string networks and use it to derive an analytical approximation to the corresponding power spectrum. We show that this approximation produces an excellent fit to more elaborate results obtained using the Velocity-dependent One-Scale model to describe cosmic string network dynamics, over a wide frequency range, in the small-loop regime.