• We compare the mean-over-variance ratio of the net-kaon distribution calculated within a state-of-the-art hadron resonance gas model to the latest experimental data from the Beam Energy Scan at RHIC by the STAR collaboration. Our analysis indicates that it is not possible to reproduce the experimental results using the freeze-out parameters from the existing combined fit of net-proton and net-electric charge mean-over-variance. The strange mesons need about 10-15 MeV higher temperatures than the light hadrons at the highest collision energies. In view of the future $\Lambda$ fluctuation measurements, we predict the $\Lambda$ variance-over-mean and skewness-times-variance at the light and strange chemical freeze-out parameters. We observe that the $\Lambda$ fluctuations are sensitive to the difference in the freeze-out temperatures established in this analysis. Our results have implications for other phenomenological models in the field of relativistic heavy ion collisions.
  • This Workshop brought top experts, researchers, postdocs, and students from high-energy heavy ion interactions, lattice QCD and hadronic physics communities together. YSTAR2016 discussed the impact of "missing" hyperon resonances on QCD thermodynamics, on freeze-out in heavy ion collisions, on the evolution of early universe, and on the spectroscopy of strange particles. Recent studies that compared lattice QCD predictions of thermodynamic properties of quark-gluon plasma at freeze-out with calculations based on statistical hadron resonance gas models as well as experimentally measured ratios between yields of different hadron species in heavy ion collisions provide indirect evidence for the presence of "missing" resonances in all of these contexts. The aim of the YSTAR2016 Workshop was to sharpen these comparisons and advance our understanding of the formation of strange hadrons from quarks and gluons microseconds after the Big Bang and in todays experiments at LHC and RHIC as well as at future facilities like FAIR, J-PARC and KL at JLab. It was concluded that the new initiative to create a secondary beam of neutral kaons at JLab will make a bridge between the hardron spectroscopy, heavy-ion experiments and lattice QCD studies addressing some major issues related to thermodynamics of the early universe and cosmology in general.